Tiffani Wallace’s 2012 Top CEU Courses, Books and Apps Related to Dysphagia

8335589660_b4c5eb311e_z

(Photo credit)

2012 was full of a lot of new experiences for me.  I was approached at the beginning of the year to begin speaking on dysphagia for PESI.  My first speaking engagements were in North Carolina in December.  I absolutely loved it!  Granted, I still have some kinks to iron out in the professional speaking world, but all in all, I thought it went pretty well.  I can’t wait for my next speaking engagement in January down south again, then in Illinois in June. I continued work on my BRS-S and finally was accepted!  Not only accepted, I passed my test!  I can now officially put BRS-S after my name.  Such long-sought and hard-earned letters!

Soon after I earned my BRS-S, I was promoted to Rehab Director of our department.  I’m still learning the ropes and working on improving our department.  I love the new job duties though.

I went to ASHA and had the opportunity to visit old friends and meet new friends.  As always, I had such a fun time!  I again had the opportunity to present a poster session.  It had a great turnout.  I worked in the SmartyEars booth, which is so much fun.  It’s always great to meet people and show off SmartyEars apps.  I always feel a lot of pride when people want to see a demonstration of Dysphagia2Go.  I would love to say that I attend the ASHA convention for the CEU’s, but I attend for the socialization.  That is one week of the year I feel like I am in “SLP heaven”.

I decided to end this post with a list.  Everyone always wants to know my recommendations.  Here are my top CEU courses, books and apps related to dysphagia.

Top CEU courses:

The VitalStim course by CIAO seminars is invaluable.  It’s absolutely great information, with such a huge emphasis on anatomy and physiology.  It is definitely worth the price whether you use the device or not.

MBSImP course by Bonnie Martin-Harris, provided by Northern Speech Services is another outstanding course.  Again, this course is based on the anatomy and physiology of the swallow and using it in interpretation of Modified Barium Swallow Studies.

Of course, my Dysphagia course.  I like to think that it is full of invaluable information.  :)

Top Books on Dysphagia:

Dysphagia Following Stroke by Stephanie K. Daniels and Maggie Lee Huckabee is absolutely excellent.  I’m in the process of re-reading it.  It is a book I will keep.


Drugs and Dysphagia
.  Great reference.


The Source for Dysphagia
by Nancy Swigert is my bible.  I love that book.


Clinical Anatomy and Physiology of the Swallowing Mechanism
.  Absolutely must-read!!


My Top Apps for Dysphagia

Of course my top vote goes to Dysphagia2Go.  I use this app all the time when I do a clinical evaluation of swallowing.  It lets me input all my data and then allows me to print a report of my findings.  This app is available for $39.99 on iTunes.

Dysphagia by Northern Speech Services costs $9.99 and offers amazing pictures of swallowing and swallowing deficits to share with your patients.

Lab Tests is a $2.99 app that allows you to look up lab values, their meanings and why the tests are performed.  This app does not require wi-fi to run.

Micromedex is a free drug app that is amazing and gives you not only information about the drug, but possible side effects, warnings, etc.  You can look up virtually any drug.

Cranial nerves is a $2.99 app that gives you information on all 12 cranial apps.  Not only does it give you the in-app information, but also allows you to, with the push of a button, access further information on the app on Wikipedia and Google.

 

I hope everyone has an amazing 2013.  I so look forward to all the new and great things to come!

This post is based on a post that originally appeared on Dysphagia Ramblings.

Tiffani Wallace, CCC-SLP, has been an SLP specializing in Dysphagia for over 11 years.  Tiffani has been very active in the social media world, creating 2 Facebook groups, Dysphagia Therapy Group and Dysphagia Therapy Group-Professional Edition.  Tiffani is also the co-author of the app Dysphagia2Go, available on iTunes.  She is preparing to travel nationally and speak on the topic of Dysphagia.  Tiffani writes a blog called Dysphagia Ramblings and is the author of www.dysphagiaramblings.com.  She is a 5 time ACE awardee and recently obtained her BRS-S.

“After Words”: The Story Behind the Film

aphasia-13-636x423

(photo credit – Aphasia Community Group) 

In 2000 I produced a program called “Faces of Aphasia,” which was held at Boston University. It aimed a spotlight on aphasia and the Aphasia Community Group of Boston. Now beginning its 24th year, the Group is one of the oldest support groups of its kind.

“Faces of Aphasia” introduced aphasia to the community through the performing arts. It featured the first public performance by acclaimed mezzo soprano Jan Curtis following her stroke. Actor/playwright Joseph Chaikin performed “Struck Dumb,” a monologue on the inner thoughts of an aphasic individual. “The Other Voices of Aphasia,” an original piece by group co-founder Judy Blatt, was performed by family members. A staged reading of “Night Sky” by Susan Yankowitz, a play about aphasia, was performed by individuals living with aphasia. It was filmed and used as a teaching tool in communication disorders graduate programs.

Inspired by “Faces of Aphasia,” Emmy Award winning filmmaker Vincent Straggas and I created the documentary “after words 2003,” which premiered in Boston in June, 2003. It featured vivid portraits of members of the Aphasia Community Group as well as internationally acclaimed celebrities such as Tony Award winner Julie Harris, Academy Award winner Patricia Neal, Grammy Award winner Bobby McFerrin, Robert McFerrin, and Annie Glenn Award winner Jan Curtis, all of whose lives were touched by aphasia and related disorders. “after words 2003” opened to wide acclaim and was embraced by the public and in academic, rehabilitation, community, and medical settings.

A new documentary, based on the original film, and comprised of new portraits and interviews has been produced and is currently airing on public television stations around the country. Co-produced by me, Vincent Straggas, ASHA fellow and executive director of the National Aphasia Association Ellayne Ganzfried, the new “after words” features neurologists, authors and clinicians including Nancy Helm Estabrooks, Ellayne Ganzfried, Jerome Kaplan, Howard Kirshner, Marjorie Nicholas, Oliver Sacks, Martha Sarno, and Gottfried Schlaug. It profiles individuals living successfully with aphasia, presents different types and severities of aphasia, including primary progressive aphasia, explores aphasia’s impact on families, discusses legal implications of aphasia, and explores the life participation approach to aphasia.

“After Words” is currently being distributed to public television stations nationwide. However, it is up to each individual station to include it in their schedule. While it has already aired in a number of cities, it has not yet aired on the majority of public television stations. Therefore, the producers of “After Words” encourage the aphasia communityspeech-language pathologists, state and local speech-language hearing associations, aphasia support groups, rehabilitation centers, individuals touched by aphasia—to contact their local public television stations and urge them to air “After Words.” We anticipate a new wave of airings to occur in the months to come, following the program’s re-distribution to public television in mid-January. Thus, contacting local stations, and in particular, program managers at these stations, when the film is re-distributed, would be especially timely.

We hope to bring this important program to the widest possible audience.  Take a look at the trailer:

Jerome Kaplan is an SLP and founder of the Aphasia Community Group of Boston.  Working with artists, actors, musicians, filmmakers, and members of the aphasia community, he has developed projects to raise aphasia awareness and understanding by illuminating the world of aphasia and promoting the life participation approach to aphasia.  His latest project, “after words,” a documentary about aphasia, is currently airing on public television.