How to Prepare to Speak at ASHA Convention for the First Time

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This year I will be presenting at the ASHA Convention for the first time. The first time I attended an ASHA convention was last year in 2013. I enjoyed the sessions I attended and set a goal to speak at an ASHA convention sometime during my career. Thanks to partnering with amazing SLPs across the country I was able to  propose five sessions for the 2014 convention. Even though I felt that each proposal was an exciting topic, I did not expect all five to be accepted as talks (or get accepted at all). But that is exactly what happened. My first time speaking at the ASHA convention, I will be involved in five sessions. Due to scheduling conflicts, I will be speaking at only four of the sessions (see below for details). So how am I going to prepare for this? Here are three things:

 

1. Stay organized. Juggling the preparation for five sessions is not easy, so organization is key. I am reducing repetitive and inefficient work by only working on presentations at specific times. To respect my fellow presenters, I am communicating when I will be able to complete individual tasks. I schedule my presentation work sessions based on established deadlines.

Working with many co-presenters (all across the country) means many emails about our presentations. I created a file folder in my email for each presentation. I file each email in the presentation’s folder. This keeps everything together in case I need to refer back to details such as deadlines, ideas, to-do lists, and plans.

I have coordinating file folders in Google Drive for document storage (e.g. proposals, slide deck drafts, my presentation notes, etc). All the documents for each presentation are kept together. Since it’s all in the cloud, I won’t leave it behind.

 

2. Reduce inconveniences. The worst part about conventions and traveling for training for me is food. I have Celiac disease and other food allergies. Convention halls aren’t the best venue for finding gluten free, healthy food. Last year I spent $20+ on lunch, when I bought a sandwich with no bread or fries (because they were fried in the same fryer as gluten) and put the meat on top of a salad. I essentially bought 2 lunches to create one lunch (and I was still hungry).

So this time, I am doing myself a favor and anticipating a busy schedule and poor food options. I found a company that will make premade meals and deliver them to my hotel (for a lot less than $20). My hotel room has a fridge, so I will keep the premade meals in the fridge and bring lunch with me. I will not waste time on long lines or risk  getting sick.

 

3. Prepare for fun. The ASHA convention isn’t my first speaking engagement as an SLP. I have been speaking about dementia and ethics in healthcare to my fellow SLPs, other healthcare professionals, students, and family members via webinars, courses, video conferences, etc. I keep doing it because it’s fun! I thoroughly enjoy creating a presentation for a specific audience to help them reach their goals. My career has evolved into spending the majority of my time in an education role. For a former teacher, this is a very welcome evolution.

 

The pre-presentation nervousness comes, but reminding myself that each speaking opportunity is an opportunity for fun and to inspire better dementia treatment and elder care relieves my jitters quickly. I am thankful for each and every opportunity, including the several at ASHA’s convention this year. See you there!

 

Rachel Wynn is one of four guest bloggers for ASHA’s convention in Orlando and will be speaking at the following sessions:

 

Friday, November 21, 2014

  • Clients at risk for suicide: Our experiences and responsibilities (Session Code 1310) 8:00-10:00 a.m.
  • Get out of that box! Four creative mold-breaking models of private practice (Session Code 1441) 3:30-4:30 p.m.

 

Saturday, November 22, 2014

  • Social media for SLPs: Leveraging online platforms to connect and advance your practice (Session Code 1704) 1:00-2:00 p.m. (Not presenting due to scheduling)
  • Dementia 101 for students and new clinicians: Changing lives through a functional approach (Session Code 1720) 1:00-2:00 p.m.
  • Productivity pressures in SNFs: Bottom up and top down advocacy (Session Code 1755) 2:30-3:30pm

 

Rachel Wynn, MS, CCC-SLP, specializes in eldercare, and, as the owner of Gray Matter Therapy, provides education to therapists, healthcare professionals, and families regarding dementia and elder care. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 15 (Gerontology) and an advocate for ethical elder care and improving workplace environments, including clinical autonomy, for clinicians.

Finding Strength, Resilience and Speech-Language Pathology—as a Future Clinician and Current Client

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Life is full of challenges; age does not play favorites. I think the key is how we handle those challenges. That is where courage, resilience and strength come into play.

Since starting undergraduate courses at the University of Central Missouri, Warrensburg, in August 2012, I faced a number of challenges—residence changes, job changes, health challenges, and school challenges. I remember rolling into the fall semester in 2013 feeling exhausted, stressed and wondering if I would make it. I was trying to put some space between my long-time boyfriend and myself. He moved across the street from me after a fire where we used to live.

I was still working about 30 hours a week, attending school full time, and preparing to start graduate school in January. The final challenge was his unexpected death from a heart attack the day before the last week of fall classes in 2013. Over the next two weeks, I made it through classes, finals and a funeral.

At 52, I have experienced my share of obstacles and stressful events, but this put me into a tailspin. I am one of the strongest women I know and my obstacles are usually short walls. I made it through the spring semester, but that first summer semester knocked me back onto my heels, mentally and physically, and I could not climb over that wall. I learned then how much support I had in the school faculty, staff and my classmates.

During that summer semester, I lost my focus. I felt buried under the mountains of clinic paperwork, a research paper and challenging coursework. My clinical evaluations were not positive, and I was floundering. That is where I pulled my courage from deep inside myself and turned to the faculty and my friends for help.

Reaching for help is hard, because sometimes the answers are not what we want to hear. My supervisors got me back on track and helped me stand up on my own two feet. I had to take a long, hard look in the mirror and face the person they saw. At the final case conferences, I asked them some direct questions, which is how I not only became a clinician this fall, but also a client. As a former U.S. Army sergeant, and as someone with a strong personality, I fit in well in some venues, but I needed help to be successful in other venues—like the speech-language pathology field. That is where the strength came in. I am self-aware, and willing to look at myself, but I had to admit I needed help with my pragmatic skills.

My clinician is wonderful, and together, we are discovering how to work on my pragmatic skills. My clinician created a scaled list of questions about how I communicate, and we used that to get feedback from my teachers and supervisors. The answers knocked me back a bit, but I accepted their feedback with grace and maturity.

We are working on my personal interaction skills, my resume, and even my social media postings. The interventions are working as my teachers and supervisors notice a difference in how I communicate. I am having a successful semester and my mid-semester conferences resulted in two A’s and a B.

Being a client is different from being a clinician. I am convinced it takes courage and strength to come into a professional clinic and lay oneself open to change. Change is hard. Change is not always fun. Sometimes change is painful.
While attending graduate school, I turned 52, and in November my first grandchild will be born. So many changes, so many opportunities lie ahead for me. This field of speech-language pathology is ripe with opportunities for older students. As nontraditional students, we have faced challenges and experienced things that younger students will not experience for a while.

Sometimes our life experiences mirror those of our clients, giving us the ability to be empathetic and genuine in our care. I am looking forward to this next chapter in my life. I will face any other challenges with courage, resilience and strength, because that is what I do.

Teresa Shane is a speech-language pathology graduate student at the University of Central Missouri in Warrensburg, Missouri.

Is There a Heffalump in the Room? Learning to Be a Leader, Part 1

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In Pooh’s “Huffalump” movie, Roo asks, “’Scuse me, what’s a heffalump?” Pooh, Tigger, Rabbit, Piglet, and Eeyore sing a song about the horrible qualities that they believe heffalumps possess (three heads, fiery eyes, spiked tails, etc.).

When presented with a difficult task or situation, we often find ourselves in conflict about how to deal with it. The Chinese word for conflict or crisis consists of two symbols: danger and opportunity. When we are faced with difficult moments, we must remember we have a choice. How we manage that choice often determines the outcome of the situation. In audiology, we are often faced with conflict ranging from difficult hearing aid fitting and counseling sessions to negotiating with vendors. Sometimes we have conflicts internally in our office or conflicts regarding professional issues in our membership organizations.

Conflict often makes us think of a negative experience that did not go well. We must remember, however, that conflict is not a bad thing but an opportunity for both personal and professional growth. Think about how boring meetings and conversations would be if people did not speak up and share their thoughts and ideas. If conflict is handled right, then there are benefits that you might not expect such as:
Better understanding of the issues and the opportunity to expand your awareness to the situation.
Increased trust among your team members and colleagues. People feel safe to express themselves, allowing an opportunity for growth.
Enhanced self-awareness due to being more aware of your goals and thoughts on how to be an effective leader and team member.

Handling conflict, however, does not necessarily come easily for most. Here are some key strategies that leaders use every day to help prevent and/or defuse conflict to allow for productive opportunities or engaged conversations.

When dealing with difficult moments:
Focus on the process. It is not about the people, it is about the system or process.
Go “below the line” for a collaborative approach for conflict resolution. Imagine an iceberg. You can only see the top, which is usually only 10 percent of it. To navigate the waters, you need to know what is below the sea line, the other 90 percent, to be safe.
Listen first and then ask questions for understanding. Remember restate, rephrase, and summarize when trying to gain understanding and trust.
• Create options collaboratively. Be open to ideas.
• Negotiate what options would solve the conflict.

When dealing with conflict, it is important to consider when do you take action and who should have the conversation. To answer when—the sooner the better. Addressing unprofessional behaviors, engaging with the dissatisfied patients, and/or intervening before people forget are essential to maintaining accountability, employee satisfaction and retention, and minimizing potential liabilities. To answer who—anyone in most cases. Regardless of the title, anyone should be able to talk to us and share ideas without feeling minimized or degraded. If the leaders blink or if the culture is of the mindset “it doesn’t matter, can’t change it…,” then it is important for the leadership to step in and be a role model on how to resolve conflict or better yet create a culture where conflict is considered to be an opportunity not a negative event.

To learn more about your conflict style, the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument is a widely used instrument that provides helpful information on your conflict style. The conflict styles are Competitive, Collaborative, Compromising, Accommodating, and Avoiding. Different situations call for different conflict styles, so knowing what domains you typically prefer will be helpful.

I encourage you to take Roo’s direction and instead of being scared of conflict, look for the heffalump yourself and discover that often the many traits outlined are things that are not true or can be negotiated.

So, you ask, how do I negotiate these uncharted waters? Next, Leadership Realities Part II will provide you with your compass.

Tamala Selke Bradham, PhD, CCC-A, is a quality consultant in the Department of Quality, Safety, and Risk Prevention at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 9, Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood.

A Student Information Tool to Help Itinerant Evaluators in Schools

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I remember attending a presentation by Dr. Wayne Secord at a conference at Stockton State College in New Jersey, back in the late 1980s or early 1990s. I couldn’t tell you the topic, however, I recall Dr. Secord saying something along the lines of “today ‘multidisciplinary’ means come together-go apart when it should mean come together-stay together.” That sentiment has remained with me all these years.

At the time the truth of this struck me like a lightening bolt. Twenty-five or so years later, this idea, by and large, still rings true. But despite our best efforts, the time we need for collaboration is sadly limited. We are overwhelmed by staggering caseload numbers, case management responsibilities, massive paperwork requirements, meetings, playground duty and more. In concert with our general duties come more and more highly involved students presenting with academic and medical challenges that require the need for continuing education and research. Never has the need for consistent collaboration been more crucial.

I am fortunate in that I work in one building. I have the luxury of having a quick conversation on the run. I also have the benefit of knowing the students in my building. However, the itinerant speech-language pathologist or evaluator does not have such luxuries of interprofessional access. Recently, several of my colleagues expressed concern that itinerant evaluators may not have the inside scoop on students, potentially posing challenges to testing accuracy.

As a result, I decided to create a document that could be completed by a classroom teacher or case manager and given to an evaluator to provide a better understanding of a student’s dynamics. I based some of the criteria on James Anderson’s Habits of Mind (HoM), but also included general information such as the types of prompting the student responds to best, preferred reinforcement, response speed, signs of fatigue or frustration, ways to redirect the student, whether breaks are needed and the preferred type of break. The document also includes demographic information and opportunities to incorporate work samples and class schedule.

The Habits of Mind present a way to think about the way students learn and are, to a large extent, a determinant in academic success or failure. The HoM include persistence, managing impulsivity, listening with understanding and empathy, thinking flexibly, metacognition, striving for accuracy, questioning, applying past knowledge, thinking and communicating with clarity, gathering data through the senses, creating and imagining, responding with wonderment and awe, taking responsible risks, finding humor, thinking interdependently, and remaining open to continuous learning.

Having an understanding of a child’s ability to manage impulsivity perhaps, or task persistence paints a more complete picture for an evaluator. Such knowledge would allow an evaluator to say, schedule movement breaks or encourage a child to take risks when responding. The upshot is, the information obtained could yield more accurate test results. I am hoping that this document provides evaluators with greater insight when administering tests and interpreting test results.

Anne Doyle, MA, CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist in Bridgewater, New Hampshire, who is in her 31st year of practice in the schools. She is a graduate of ASHA’s Leadership Development Program and is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Groups 1, Language Learning and Education, and 16, School-Based Issues. This post is adapted from  the post “Help for Itinerant Evaluators” on her blog “Doyle Speech Works.”

When Social Media Turns Antisocial—and What We Can Do

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I really have fun with social media. My platform of preference is Instagram. It’s fun, it’s a quick share, and it doesn’t afford opportunities for ranting. I post to Facebook intermittently and I tweet infrequently. It all can be fairly overwhelming.
While on the surface, it seems social media has connected us, in my humble opinion, it has disconnected us. We’ve all seen it: a family out to dinner. The little one is watching a movie, as another is playing a game on the phone. The teen is texting a friend, and mom and dad aren’t talking.

In our family, we have an unstated rule when we are out to eat: no media! We talk and we laugh (Annie Doyle likes this).

I know I am not alone in being concerned that media, in particular social media is negatively affecting communication. I haven’t grown up with social media. In fact, I remember when we first went “online,” I was terrified. I recall chat rooms that could be pretty dicey. I also remember the thrill when I heard the classic “You have mail.” Who me? Today, I err on the side of caution. I make it a point not to have any online “friendships” with my students, their parents, the children of my friends, or my children’s friends, so I really don’t know what they are posting about.

I have heard tragic stories of social media run amok and it is disturbing. We, as parents of teens, have access to our children’s passwords and they know we DO check. We are steadfast in our roles as parents and know our children are not always happy about our “meddling,” but it’s a scary world.

I also am aware of the effect social media has had on me. I have made some wonderful connections via the Instagram and blogging world, and I am so grateful for that. I have reconnected with friends from 30 years ago. There also have been times I’ve been consumed with social networking. Never has this been more apparent than since I have started blogging. I have asked myself: “Do I really have 15 followers? Woohoo!!” “How many page views today?” “Why won’t so and so acknowledge my posts/efforts?” I have experienced emotional contagion whereby I have felt the emotions of others after viewing a posted video of the homeless or a mother singing to her dying daughter. I’ve read with disdain political rantings and ad hominem attacks made without the need for civilized discourse.

As an adult I can choose to ignore these posts, block the author, or unfriend individuals who use Facebook as a sounding board. Middle school and high school students, whose social life incorporates social networks, may not have the wherewithal to to do the same.

What follows is just a brainstorm of the possible problems our students might “face” when using social media.

  • Over-sharing: Many people become turned off by posts documenting every moment of everyday.
  • Impulsive posting: Posts that are written when hurt or angry.
  • Confidence killers: So many gauge their popularity by the number of friends they have or the number of likes a post receives.
  • Misinterpretation of posts: This happens so frequently. We can’t know the tone of voice without hearing it and we don’t know the intent with which posts are written.
  • Misperception of our posts: Likewise others don’t have the benefit of knowing our intent.
  • Bullying: The internet is rife with opportunities for harassment. Individuals are so often emboldened by the cover of anonymity.
  • Feeling alienated: What is it about that “like” button? We are all too aware of who likes our posts and who ignores them and many are easily hurt by the passive-aggressive nature of “not liking.”
  • Macy’s window: When a post is out there, it is out there forever. It’s like standing in Macy’s window for all to see.
  • FOMO (fear of missing out): Kids often feel left out and alienated when they see posts of friends doing fun things and they aren’t included. As a kid who wants to belong, there is often nothing worse than feeling excluded.
  • Ranting: Tirades are off-putting!
  • Attention-getting: Kids are needy and social media is the perfect outlet for posting for attention. Positive or negative, attention is attention and meets the same need.
  • Not being in the moment: I have seen more people stop enjoying the moment to post a picture to Facebook or Instagram (guilty).
  • Time blackhole: Why waste time texting, waiting for a response, texting again…?
  • Disingenuous posts: Kids can post without honoring what they are really feeling. There have been sad stories of kids who have shared seemingly happy posts all the while hiding deep sadness.
  • What’s missing: At least 80 percent of our communication is conveyed through tone of voice and body language, so while we may seem connected there is an awful lot we are missing.

As communication gurus, we can help our older students not get caught in the social media quagmire. Let’s collectively encourage our students to have a healthy relationship with social media. Let’s work toward being models who use social media to improve the world we live in, to disseminate quality information, to learn, and to spread joy.

For instance, let’s all consider the following, and teach our students as well, to:

  • Read and reread posts, text messages, and emails and if there is a nagging feeling that says, “Don’t post,” trust those instincts.
  • Don’t put stock in the number of likes on a post; it really is meaningless and what counts is the sharing of a valuable moment or idea.
  • Don’t post controversial material: try to keep it happy, as social media is no place for political tirades. If feeling compelled to make a point, do it respectfully and without profanity and hurtfulness.
  • Turn off notifications. It can make you crazy.
  • Make efforts to engage in face to face conversation or at least the telephone. Allow yourself to key into tone of voice and body language. When firming up plans, how about a real conversation? Just pick up the phone for Pete’s sake!
  • Don’t over-share. People don’t really want a play by play of your day by day.
  • Be sure that what you post is a reflection of what you truly believe or feel. Be genuine and if you need help ask for it. In this day and age no one should suffer alone.
  • Learn to take posts at face value. Without a conversation you can only guess what the intent or motivation of another is.
  • Don’t post when you are emotionally charged, you will regret it.
  • Live in the moment: when doing something fun don’t stop what your doing to post. Wait until the activity is finished and then share.

I would love to hear your thoughts on social media and communication. Please share any of your awesome ideas for encouraging safe social media practices.

Anne Doyle, MA, CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist in Bridgewater, New Hampshire, who is in her 31st year of practice in the schools. She is a graduate of ASHA’s Leadership Development Program and is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Groups 1, Language Learning and Education, and 16, School-Based Issues. This post is adapted from  the post “Un-Social Media” on her blog “Doyle Speech Works.”

Changing the Clinical Question from ‘Can I?’ to ‘How Can I?’

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It’s always easy to discuss how things should be. We start sentences with:

“It’d be great if…”

“Ideally…”

“In a perfect world…”

But typically, when we discuss ideals, we quickly follow up with:

“But that’s not realistic.”

“Too bad that can’t actually happen.”

“Wish it could really be that way.”

When it comes to clinical practice, I think we default to the latter group of statements far too often. We significantly limit what we believe is actually possible, because the things we know are good in theory are just too hard to apply in the “real world.” It’s easy to sit through a graduate class or a continuing education session, but it’s another thing entirely to apply that information day-to-day in the therapy room. Think about some examples:

We learn about the importance of evidence-based practice, but “realistically,” there is not a vast amount of high-quality evidence for many of our practices in this relatively young field.

We discuss the necessity of being sensitive to culturally and linguistically diverse populations, but “realistically,” we can never learn to speak every language or understand every culture.

We understand that the Code of Ethics exists for the purpose of maintaining best practices, but “realistically,” ethical dilemmas are not always so black-and-white.

So what’s the point then? Why do we have standards that we can’t live up to in practice? Why are we taught things that we are doubtful we can ever actually apply?

That, right there, is the problem. It’s the question we’re asking. We look at a client or a situation, and we ask, “Can I do this?”

“Can I find any evidence to guide my clinical decisions with this unique and difficult case?”

“Can I effectively treat this client whose language I do not speak?

“Can I maintain my personal and professional ethical codes when a ‘sticky situation’ arises?”

The problem with these questions is that from the moment we decide to become speech-language pathologists, we have already answered all of them. In accepting the responsibilities that come with being a part of this field, we have already said a huge, resounding “Yes” to every ‘Can I?’ question. No matter how challenging the situation may be, yes, we can do it, because we must.

One of my professors recently challenged our class to change the question. When faced with difficult situations that make us uneasy, or cause us to doubt what we can handle, we have to start thinking of it differently. Instead of asking, “Can I do this?” we should ask, How will I do this?”

 How will I follow the levels-of-evidence hierarchy in order to implement EBP, even when the current existing evidence base is not extremely strong in this particular area?”

How will I be creative and use resources to effectively treat this client whose language I do not speak?”

How will I ensure that I maintain my personal and professional ethical codes and engage in best practices, even when a ‘sticky situation’ arises?”

 How will I do this?”

 Many people are familiar with the famous quote from Spider Man, “With great power comes great responsibility.” While a few ‘Cs’ behind your name may not seem like power to most of the world, as members of this field, we know differently. SLPs have the power to help others, facilitate communication, and cause change, and I would say that is great power. We have been given the power, and therefore we have accepted the responsibility. We have said, “Yes,” to every tricky situation and every obstacle, whatever it may be, no matter how challenging. We have said “Yes,” because it is our responsibility to do so, based on the power we have been given. We can, because we must.

The next time you are faced with a tough case and are tempted to ask, “Can I do this?,” remember that you have already answered yourself. Can you do this? Yes, you can, because you must.

So, start asking yourself and others something different. Start changing the question. Start asking, “How?”
Kelsey Roberts is a student in the master’s speech-language pathology program at Abilene Christian University in Abilene, Texas.

You Want My Kid to Play in Food? Seriously?

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Yep, seriously.  For many kids, food exploration begins with just learning to tolerate messy hands and faces. Many parents who bring their kids to feeding therapy have one goal in mind:  Eating. In fact, as a pediatric feeding therapist, a common phrase I hear when observing families at their dinner tables is, “Quit playing with your food and just eat it!”

What parents may not understand is that the child is not avoiding food—the child is experiencing it. For the hesitant eater, this may be where a child needs to start. The palms of our hands and our fingers are rich with nerve endings, but the mouth has even more. Playing with food provides the child with information about size, texture, temperature and the changing properties of food as little hands squish and squash, pat and roll, or just pick up and let go: splat!

Here are three silly ways to play in food!  Give it a try—some of it just may end up in your child’s mouth in the process. But if it doesn’t, don’t  worry. Learning to be an adventurous eater takes time and the most important part of the journey is keeping it fun!

  1. Pudding Car Wash: For kids who can’t tolerate the feel of purees, learning to play in a consistently smooth puree, like chocolate pudding, is the preliminary step to eventually playing in more textured foods, like mashed cauliflower. The key is water.  Most kids who hate to get messy enjoy water play, for obvious reasons.  If they can’t tolerate water play, then that’s the place to start, and eventually they will progress to pudding.  You’ll need:
  • Cookie sheet
  • 2 large bowls—one filled with water and soap bubbles and the other with clean water
  • Small toy cars
  • Chocolate pudding
  • It’s simple! Dump some “mud” (chocolate pudding) on the cookie sheet and you now have a “muddy run raceway” to drive through till the cars are coated!  Pushing a toy car through the mud is much easier than just playing in the mud with a bare hand.  The bigger the car, the easier it is to tolerate the sensation, because less mud gets on the hesitant child’s hand.  Plop the car in the “wash” (the soap bubble water) and then fish it out.  Plop it in the clear water and begin again.  The water adds a bit of relief for the kids who are tactilely defensive, but the fun of driving the cars through the mud provides the reinforcement for getting messy. Warning: This could go on all day—kids love it!
  • Variation: Use plastic animals and wash the entire zoo!
  1. Ice Pop Stir Sticks: For kids who cannot tolerate icy-cold in their mouths, add cups of water to take off the chill. There is a significant difference between straight-from-the-freezer-frozen and just icy-cold.  When fruity ice pops on a stick are dipped in cool water, the surface of the ice pop immediately begins to melt.  Now, when your kiddo takes a lick, they’ll lick off just flavored cold water. Keep stirring and the water becomes darker and more flavorful.  Add a skinny straw so kids try a taste. Coffee stirrers work well for this, because the narrow diameter of the stir stick allows just the tiniest taste to land on the tongue.
  2. Hand Print Animal Pictures: I always shudder when I see kids in daycare having to make “hand print” pictures if I know they have sensory challenges including tactile defensiveness. The well-meaning teacher grabs the child’s tiny hand and pushes it into a paper plate of paint before pressing it onto a piece of construction paper to make the infamous hand print, which is later transformed into an animal to be displayed in the classroom. Or, and for some this may be worse, the kids get their hand painted with a tickly paint brush.  That can be very upsetting for a child who doesn’t like to get messy.  Instead, try starting with the teacher’s own handprint, then encourage the child to use the tip of his index finger or the side of his little thumb to make the eye of the handprint animal. That’s the part of the hand where most kids are willing to tolerate a little mess. Think about how you pick up a slimy worm on the sidewalk…you snag it with just the tip of your index finger and the side of your thumb and then toss it quickly back into your garden. That quick release is key—kids need that too. Over time, they’ll work their way up to making an entire zoo of hand print pictures!  Here’s a video that will help you create three African animals—your own handprint safari!

So, the next time you get frustrated with your child for playing in his or her food—think of the child as a little explorer discovering all the properties of food! Encourage it…. it just might lead to a closer food encounter with the mouth!

Melanie Potock, MA, CCC-SLP, treats children birth to teens who have difficulty eating.  She is the author of Happy Mealtimes with Happy Kids and the producer of the award-winning kids’ CD Dancing in the Kitchen: Songs that Celebrate the Joy of Food!  Melanie’s two-day course on pediatric feeding is  offered for ASHA CEUs and includes both her book and CD for each attendee.  She can be reached at Melanie@mymunchbug.com.

 

Kid Confidential: Parent Education and Training, Part 3

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I began this series noting the positive effects of parent education and training and sharing tips for how to provide it.  Then, in part 2, I discussed how I implement parent education/training in my therapy sessions.  Here, in part 3, I discuss how I use digital recording to support parent training and education.

Although I own a tablet for therapy, my most valued device on that tablet is the video camera. Most of the time you will not find me with some speech or language app open on my tablet. Rather, you’ll see me with toys all over the floor and my tablet set up with the camera ready to record.

When working closely with parents during therapy, I find that digital recordings provide helpful feedback on a parent’s use of therapy techniques.  It works especially well during real-time education and training (you can read about this in part 2 of this series), as so much of language development depends on the ways caregivers communicate with young children.

The following are some personal rules I like to follow when using digital recordings in therapy:

  1.  Be careful of confidentiality when recording:  This seems so basic but I always get parents’ permission prior to recording their child.  Also I am very cautious when sharing digital recordings of clients as I always worry about secure emails, websites and such.  I tend to use thumb drives, when I can, to share the digital recordings with parents in person just to ensure security. If I cannot provide the parents with a thumb drive on the spot week to week (the one big problem I have found using my tablet camera) I will be sure to still review the digital recording on the spot during the session for educational purposes.
  2. Record only portions of the session:  I understand parents do not have a lot of time to review recordings, so I try to only record simple models of techniques by myself, followed by parents’ trials with my positive feedback and suggestions for modifications or changes. This way, if parents question how to implement the techniques, they have a quick refresher ready for them. My rule of thumb is to try and keep these recordings to five minutes or so. This way parents can quickly access the information they need.
  3. A few things I like to record when I can:
    1. Initially, I always try to record basic parent interactions and hopefully PLAY with their child (this is not about telling the parent how “wrong” they are in the way they interact with their child, but rather it’s about increasing parental awareness of the types of interactions they tend to have with their child.  For example, are they always asking their child questions? Are they talking “at” rather than “to” their child?  This video review is non-judgmental but educational in nature.
    2. Sibling interactions can also be very helpful as well if the sibling is older and can understand and learn to use various techniques to help the younger child.
    3. Sometimes taping sibling interactions is a great way to teach parents how to play with their language delayed child.
    4. I try to record “before” and “after” the use of strategies. Parents love to see how they themselves have changed over time and I love to show them!
  4. Record great parent and sibling interactions:  The last things I like to try to record are moments of wonderful interactions between the child and his parent and/or siblings. I love sharing those moments and reviewing all the great techniques used by the family members. This is not only a great review, but continues to encourage and empower parents to keep up the good work. I also like to keep previous recordings so that parents can see their personal progress over time.  It is amazing to watch their faces when they see how far they have come!

In my experience, digital recordings can really enhance parent education and training, can be a great reminder and resource for parents, and can encourage and empower parents to continue to use good therapy strategies and techniques at home to continue fostering language development in their child.

Maria Del Duca, MS, CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in southern Arizona.  She owns a private practice, Communication Station: Speech Therapy, PLLC, and has a speech and language blog under the same name.  She has been practicing as an ASHA certified member since 2003 and is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 16, School-Based Issues.  She has experience in various settings such as private practice, hospital and school environments and has practiced in New Jersey, Maryland, Kansas and now Arizona.  Maria has a passion for early childhood, autism spectrum disorder, rare syndromes, and childhood apraxia of speech.  For more information, visit her blog or find her on Facebook.

Collaboration Corner: Must-Have Books for Building Language and Literacy

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I can’t believe it’s September! For those of us in public schools, that means re-organizing and replenishing our bag of tricks. Books of course, are an easy and engaging way to expand language.

If parents are looking for some ideas on stocking up their bookshelves (or yours) this list may help.

I also rely upon my librarian colleagues for other ideas. If I can find the board book version of anything, I usually opt for that version; board books are durable and allow you to do things like add pictures with a little bit of Velcro for matching, like this:

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For very young children, or children with language delays, I generally use a couple (or five) quick pointers when perusing the bookstore:

  • Engaging pictures that aren’t too visually complicated but have a clear character and setting.
    • Targets: Who, what, where, when questions, descriptive language.
  • Books with repetitive words and phrases.
    • Targets: Oral/expressive language and literacy skills through  predictable text patterns and repetitive lines.
  • Books that aren’t too long, maybe 10-12 pages.
    • Target: Maximize engagement for short attention spans.
  • Books that can allow the adult to target core language concepts, either through text or illustrations.
    • Target: Syntax, vocabulary.
  • Books that enable the adult to expand beyond the text.
    • Targets: Commenting, labeling how a character feels or what they are thinking.

There are many books from which to choose, but here are some good starters for your collection:

  • Good Night Gorilla: Peggy Rathmann
  • The Very Hungry Caterpillar: Eric Carle
  • Have You Seen My Cat?:  Eric Carle
  • Good Night Moon: Margaret Wise Brown
  • Blue Hat, Green Hat: Sandra Boynton
  • Where’s Spot?: Eric Hill
  • Go Away Big Green Monster: Ed Emberley
  • Big Red Barn: Margaret Wise Brown
  • Good Dog, Carl: Alexandra Day

Not every book on this list follows every guideline perfectly,  but all allow for a positive learning experience that supports child language and preliteracy development.

Have an inspired school year colleagues!

 

Kerry Davis EdD, CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist in the Boston area, working with children who have significant communication challenges. She conducts trainings and workshops, and serves as a volunteer speech-language pathologist and consultant for Step by Step Guyana, a school for children with autism in South America. The opinions expressed in this post are her own, and not those of her employer.

 

Finding the Right Fit: Social Pragmatics Groups in Middle School

1kidgroupThe recent explosion of social pragmatics curricula and materials for students with social challenges like autism spectrum disorder is both a blessing and a curse to those of us SLPs who work in private practice or outpatient settings. On the one hand, I am grateful for the selection of topics and target goals. On the other hand, how can we best weed through it all and offer a group curriculum that is the most functional and change-inspiring for this tricky but very deserving population of pre-adolescents?

There are many benefits of conducting groups outside the school environment in an outpatient setting, including more time spent on concepts, practice in a “safe” and diverse environment (participants may not have to see each other again), making new friends (participants may like to see each other again), parent/caregiver education and training, and parent/caregiver networking opportunities.

Along with the benefits, there are challenges that are unique for private practice and outpatient SLPs as we try to help these children and their families. These challenges can be grouped into two categories: logistical and content-related.

Logistics are tricky, but are definitely the easiest barriers to overcome. A typical group series for outpatient settings lasts 8 weeks. Group sessions range from 1-2 hours, depending on the number of participants. Costs to families for each session can be substantial, despite the Health Care Affordability Act, whether it be insurance co-pays or out-of-pocket. And there are also transportation costs and challenges for families who live in rural areas. These barriers mostly belong to the families of our group participants, but SLPs can help reduce their impact by strategies such as offering the group at “family-friendly” times (evenings or Saturdays), as well as choosing a central location for the meetings.

Once logistics are met, the real work begins. This brings me to the content of this post: content-related challenges. As a former instructional designer and journalist, my foremost consideration is “know my audience.” It may be a funny way to initially think about a therapy group, but it’s a basic tenant that I find critical.

Unlike the school setting where therapists can get to know the child in their “natural environment,” outpatient SLPs must somehow determine which kids can best go together in groups. Finding the right fit may sound like a logistical challenge, but is actually content-based.

From experience, placing the right kids together can make or break the success of the group, particularly at the tween/middle school age. Knowing this however, is only the beginning of the solution. My colleagues and I have whittled out three main areas of need for this age group:

  • Basic Social Rules—skills associated with being with another or group, such as eye contact, body language, expected behaviors, thinking about others.
  • Conversation Rules—skills associated with communication with another or group, such as establishing a topic, asking and answering questions, staying on or switching topics, social wondering.
  • Higher-level Social Skills—skills associated with making others comfortable and making/keeping friends, such as social problem-solving and perspective-taking.

Regardless of diagnosis or age, these three areas seem to be a good way to group kids so that behaviors can be managed equally and everyone learns. I have tried pragmatic assessments such as the CELF-5 Pragmatics subtest. I have given self-made parent/caregiver surveys of functional skills that coincide with the teaching concepts of the group. I have given their referring SLPs surveys of functional skills. Sometimes I have used all three methods. So far, I have not found a combination that can qualify everyone accurately. In every group, there always seems to be at least one kid whose skills are significantly more advanced or significantly more impaired than the rest.

The question is this: How can we most effectively figure out where each child fits? How do we qualify a child for the right group when the reality is that most of our candidates demonstrate a constellation of challenges across two or all of these areas?

That is the question I am posing to this ASHAsphere community. Thank you in advance for your responses as we problem-solve together.

Lisa Lucas, MA, CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist in Cincinnati, Ohio. She practices as an outpatient SLP for Cincinnati Children’s Hospital and as a telepractice SLP for Presence Learning. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 18, Telepractice.