Helping Middle Schoolers With Organization and Time Management

Students often find the transition from primary to secondary school a challenge. Especially those who experience issues with executive-function skills. Many of my students (and even their typically developing peers) particularly struggle with organization and time management. For example, kids spend most of their time in one classroom in elementary school, while from 6th to 12th grade, they move through classes with different teachers and subjects.

I spend a lot of time working with my kids to develop these skills for many reasons. I stress that if they think it’s hard now, it will only get trickier as academic demands increase. Below are just a few ways I work on organization and time management with my students:

1. Folders
Students should use separate folders for each class. Many students already do this, but my kids must work harder to keep them organized. They pile everything into one folder and can never find what they need. Spend a session going through your students’ folders and putting papers where they belong. We also discuss what’s important to keep versus what they should throw out.

2. Planners
I don’t think I could get through life without some kind of planner or organizer. Introduce students to how and why to use a planner. It’s a visual reminder of what they need to do each day and for planning steps for future tasks or assignments. Check if your school has free planners. Also, you can print out weekly planning pages for your kids and make them a planner. If your students are tech savvy, show them how to use a calendar app. Or check out the many downloadable planning apps to see which ones they might like to use.

3. Check-lists/Schedules
Similar to a planner, checklists and schedules provide students with a visual reference of tasks they need to accomplish.

  • Checklists are great to organize all the things needed to get done for the day or week. We feel accomplished when we cross things off. Help students generate a checklist of what they need to get done. It can include homework, projects, reading, chores, etc…. You can also show them how to break down projects into smaller chunks, so they’re not as overwhelmed with assignments. For example, if they have a five-paragraph essay due, they spend each weekday working on just one paragraph, versus facing the WHOLE thing in one day.
  • A student struggling with time management may find a daily schedule helpful. Drafting a schedule together will help you see what the student does or can do with his or her time each day. It’s also a good opportunity to help that particular student come up with a plan.

4. Backpacks
I don’t know if it’s just my kids, but their backpacks are a MESS! Sometimes I take a look inside and wonder how they find anything. I’ve spent entire sessions just organizing and cleaning out bags. The kids are amazed at the things they find—lost homework or projects due months ago, for example. As with folders, this is a good time to discuss what they need to carry with them and what they should leave at home.

I hope these ideas will help your students with executive-function challenges. I like to try different strategies and see what’s successful. If one thing doesn’t work, try something else!

Gabriella Schecter, MS, CCC-SLP, is a full-time SLP working in a grade 6-12 school. She posts regularly on Instagram (@middleschoolSLP), sharing ideas and activities for this age group. Check out her blog or email her at MiddleschoolSLP@gmail.com.

 

When Patients Won’t Practice

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You give 100 percent in each session, but end up repeating last week’s activities because your patient didn’t practice. Who’s at fault?

We all tend to get complacent with the materials and techniques we use. Thankfully, we also take CEU courses to keep ideas and implementations fresh. But what if you try everything in your bag of tricks and your patient still doesn’t improve?

I discussed this exact issue with two of my patients recently. Each one had a different situation, but both were making limited progress. “John,” for example, sought treatment with the hope that others would stop complaining about his voice quality. He says he stopped doing the diaphragmatic breathing exercises I assigned, because his voice wasn’t any better. I replied that it takes more than a week of doing only breathing exercises to make improvement. Breathing is just the first component of coordinating a new voice.

He and I talked about the real reason he was here. I discovered that although he felt his voice sounded disordered, it was really only affecting those around him. It really didn’t bother him that others thought his voice was annoying, so he decided not to continue sessions. Fair enough.

“Sara’s” case was different. She and I worked together for several weeks and ended up going through almost the same session each time. She reported practicing, but I didn’t see evidence of that in her productions. Frustrations arose and she felt like she was getting nowhere.

In our most recent session, we talked at length about life and the projected outcomes of her condition. Her voice issues affect her life, which upsets her. This emotional roadblock gets in the way of her dedicating time to practice outside the treatment room. She also feels guilt and blames herself for the issue, even though it’s not at all her fault. She realizes that these feelings are holding her back, so she’s taking time off from sessions and coming back when she’s ready to commit.

We should try to build up patients when they come to us feeling down on themselves. That might be tricky, however, because we also point out their mistakes in order to correct them. Sometimes sharing personal experiences as encouragement helps. It’s never a bad idea to refer clients to a therapist or counselor as supplemental treatment—it’s even in our code of ethics and scope of practice.

I do this occasionally when sessions frequently turn into “therapy.” If I think a patient would benefit from talking through issues with a trained professional, I always refer out. That way when the patient comes to our sessions, we focus on the voice disorder and I know the other issues are being addressed.

If your patient isn’t practicing, it’s time to find out why. Is it motivation? Is it you? Do your best to figure out what else the patient needs from you to be successful, and offer many options. Sometimes all you have to do is ask.

 

 

Kristie Knickerbocker, MS, CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist and singing voice specialist in Fort Worth, Texas. She provides voice, swallowing and speech-language treatment in her private practice, a tempo Voice Center, LLC, and lectures on the singing voice to area choirs and students. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 3, Voice and Voice Disorders. Knickerbocker blogs on her website at www.atempovoicecenter.com. Follow her on Twitter @atempovoice or like her on Facebook at www.facebook.com/atempovoicecenter.

 

How Do You Know When it’s a Language Delay Versus a Disorder?

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Editor’s Note: This is an excerpt from a blog post that originally appeared on Special Education Guide. 

How do you know when it’s a language delay versus a disorder?

Unfortunately, there is not always a straightforward answer to this question. A language delay is just that—a delay in acquisition of language skills compared to one’s chronological and cognitive/intellectual age-peers. A young child with a language delay may exhibit a slower onset of a language skill, rate of progression through the acquisition process, sequence in which the language skills are learned, or all of the above.

However, there is a subset of children who continue to demonstrate persistent difficulties acquiring and using language skills below chronological age expectations (by preschool or school age) that cannot be explained by other factors (for example, low nonverbal intelligence, sensory impairments or autism spectrum disorder) and may be identified as having a specific language impairment (language disorder).

In contrast to a delay or a disorder is a language difference. With a language difference, communication behaviors meet the norms of the primary speech community but do not meet the norms of Standard English. This difference can exist whether the person in question is a child from a different country or simply from a different neighborhood in the same city.

So, what are some options for addressing language delays and disorders?

Intervention for a delay may take on several forms:

  • Indirect treatment and monitoring
    • Provide activities for parents and caregivers to engage in with the child, such as book-sharing and parent-child interaction groups.
    • Check in with the family periodically to monitor language development.
  • Direct intervention, including techniques such as:
    • Expansions—repeating the child’s utterance and adding grammatical and semantic detail.
    • Recasts—changing the mode or voice of the child’s original utterance (for example, declarative to interrogative).
    • Build-ups and breakdowns—the child’s utterance is expanded (built up) and then broken down into grammatical components (break down) and then built up again into its expanded form.

Intervention for a language disorder is child specific and based on that child’s current level of language functioning, profile of strengths and weaknesses, and functioning in related areas, including hearing, cognitive level and speech production skills. The overall goal of intervention is to stimulate language development and teach skills to enhance communication and access academic content. The developmental appropriateness and potential effectiveness on communication and academic and social success should be considered when developing treatment goals.

 

Aruna Hari Prasad, MA, CCC-SLP, is ASHA associate director of school services.  ahariprasad@asha.org

An SLPA Eases a School SLP’s Load

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With only two years in the profession as a certified speech-language pathologist, I started in the schools not knowing  if the workload is overwhelming or just the norm. The 2013-2014 school year was my clinical fellowship experience. I excitedly trudged my way through the paperwork system, found my footing as a therapist and emerged with nothing but wind in my sails.

Yet wind always ebbs and flows. By December of 2014, I realized the overwhelming paperwork leading to canceled sessions was more than what my colleagues were experiencing. I spoke up at our quarterly staff meeting and made it clear I needed some help. I was done sacrificing students’ treatment time for paperwork. With only three speech-language pathology assistants in the district, I didn’t expect much, to be honest. The request was more for my sanity, so that if someone found me under a stack of Individualized Education Programs, there was a story to tell.

To my great surprise, on the first day back after winter break, I read a delightful email from one of the SLPAs reporting she would be with me every Friday till the end of the year. Yay!!

I then immediately started realizing all the things that come along with having an SLPA. I share my (small) office space, walk her through my goals for each student, supervise her with students and sign off on all the paperwork. I almost regretted my decision to ask for the help. But no, no…It was worth it, right?

Then came the self-doubt, all my insecurities crept in. How unorganized I can be with materials, how behind I get with Medicaid billing, how I feel like no one could handle the kids like I do. No, no, it will be fine, I reassured myself. And it was.

My new SLPA arrived on her first Friday. We got right to work going over the day’s schedule, reviewing goals and discussing student’s current skills. Within 35 minutes, she looked through my materials, set up her lessons and was ready for the day. She’s been an SLPA longer than I’ve been an SLP, so it was just another Friday for her. There I was, nervous and excited and she was just wondering where the staff lounge was. Funny how things work out.

I spent that first Friday observing from my desk while writing six IEPs for next Monday’s meetings and finishing an evaluation report, all before noon. None of my kids missed their sessions. If anything, treatment stayed more focused because their SLP wasn’t a crazed lady partially pondering when she was going to do paperwork versus how well they said their /s/ and /z/.

Having an SLPA, even just once a week, makes all the difference with the rest of my sessions. I plan my week out, factoring in the time I know I’ll have on Fridays. Time I spend doing evaluations, writing up extended school year data, monitoring progress for Response to Intervention, collaborating with my classroom teachers and making phone calls home. There are many things that get swept to the side when you have mandatory deadlines always approaching. Having an SLPA has already helped in ways I can’t put to words.

I didn’t realize just how stressed I was until my SLPA swooped in saved my sanity. We’re still working out kinks in the schedule and treatment details, but the benefits far outweigh any of these. If we both continue to coordinate and communicate the session progress, I know I’ll see exciting growth in those students during the final push to the end of the school year.

 

Katie Millican, MEd, CCC-SLP, is an SLP for the Matanuska-Susitna Borough (Alaska) School district. She graduated from the University of West Georgia with her bachelor’s and master’s of education degrees. Her interest in technology leads her to integrate it into day-to-day sessions. She enjoys connecting with her blog readers (SLP_Echo) through all things social media: Twitter, Instagram and Google +.

Snow Day Recap

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It’s a snow day here at ASHA and for many of our members on the East Coast. So whether (pun intended!) you’re snowed in or not, curl up with some of our most popular posts from 2014 in this compilation published earlier this year.

 

From stuttering to aphasia, hearing loss to hearing aids, early intervention to telepractice and more, ASHA’s blog posts are written by you—our members—sharing knowledge with peers on a variety of subjects. But there’s no doubt about it, pediatric feeding has been the topic on ASHAsphere in 2014!

Check out your five favorite posts from last year:

Step Away From the Sippy Cup!

SLP Melanie Potock specializes in pediatric feeding and explains that sippy cups were created to keep floors clean, not as a tool to be used for developing oral motor skills.

“Sippy cups were invented for parents, not for kids. The next transition from breast and/or bottle is to learn to drink from an open cup held by an adult in order to limit spills or to learn to drink from a straw cup. Once a child transitions to a cup with a straw, I suggest cutting down the straw so that the child can just get his lips around it, but can’t anchor his tongue underneath it.” – Potock

Baby Led Weaning: A Developmental Perspective

For parents interested in following the Baby Led Weaning (BLW) philosophy of pediatric feeding, which states that babies are developmentally capable of reaching for food and putting it in their mouths at about 6 months of age, SLP Melanie Potock shares some thoughts to consider.

“For children in feeding therapy, incorporating some aspects of BLW is dependent on that child’s individual delays or challenges and where they are in the developmental process, regardless of chronological age. My primary concern for any child is safety—be aware and be informed, while respecting each family’s mealtime culture.” – Potock

Collaboration Corner: 10 Easy Tips for Parents to Support Language

Paying attention to body language, reading every day and using pictures are just a few tips SLP Kerry Davis shares with parents to support their child’s language development.

“Take pictures of your child’s day and talk about what is coming up next, or make a photo album of fun activities (vacation, going out for ice cream) to talk about.” – Davis

What SLPs Need to Know About the Medical Side of Pediatric Feeding

To overcome pediatric feeding problems, SLP Krisi Brackett explains the importance of first figuring out why the child’s in a food rut.

“Whether the child is dependent on tube feedings, not moving to textured foods, grazing on snack foods throughout the day, failing to thrive, pocketing foods or spitting foods out, using medical management strategies can greatly improve a child’s success in feeding therapy.” – Brackett

Preventing Food Jags: What’s a Parent to Do?

For kids who only eat a limited number of foods, it can be difficult for parents to provide the right nutrition for their kids. SLP Melanie Potock shares her top 10 suggestions for preventing food jag.

“Food Left on the Plate is NOT Wasted: Even if it ends up in the compost, the purpose of the food’s presence on a child’s plate is for him to see it, smell it, touch it, hear it crunch under his fork and  perhaps, taste it.  So if the best he can do is pick it up and chat with you about the properties of green beans, then hurray!  That’s never a waste, because he’s learning about a new food.” – Potock

 

ASHA always welcomes new blog contributers. Interested? Apply to here become an ASHAsphere blogger.

Sara Mischo is the web producer at ASHA. She can be reached at smischo@asha.org.

Our Profession’s Biggest Open Secret

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What’s the biggest open secret in our field? Each of us might have slightly different answers. Here’s mine: the reason so many students are blocked from receiving needed services is because their home states have not updated their Medicaid telepractice policies.

Children who qualify for Medicaid coverage, by definition, are from low-income families. My experience is that these children are disproportionately affected by the shortage of SLPs and could therefore benefit a great deal from access to treatments delivered via telepractice.

In addition, many schools, when faced with tight budgets, simply do not have the money to hire additional SLPs–telepractice or not–without Medicaid funds.

This places an unfair burden on the rural and urban schools that need telepractice the most. They struggle more than their affluent peers to find qualified SLPs. One reason is that those wealthier districts can pay substantially more for treatment delivered via telepractice if state Medicaid policies haven’t been updated to reimburse for online services.

This isn’t the most surprising part of the secret, however. That honor goes to how easily states can make the change. Consider this:

  • The federal government, which partners with each state on its Medicaid plan, has already approved billing for telepractice. That’s right, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services already has an approved billing treatment for treatment delivered via telepractice.
  • All reimbursements for telepractice are paid for entirely by the federal government. This means that states don’t pay for additional reimbursements out of pocket. Let me repeat that one more time: allowing reimbursement for telepractice increases access to services without requiring additional funds from your state’s Medicaid program.
  • For all states that PresenceLearning has researched—aside from Indiana—allowing reimbursement for telepractice is as simple as publishing a clarifying policy memo. The memo should say that online services can be billed with the same codes as traditional sessions as long as a “GT” telepractice modifier is included for tracking purposes.

It is important to keep in mind that telepractice is just a different delivery method for services already approved by CMS and reimbursed by Medicaid in schools.  SLPs provide online services using the same approaches and materials they would use if they were physically at the school site. 

What can you do to help students get the treatment they need by motivating your state to write that memo?

  • Speak to stakeholders to build a consensus. Stakeholders include: ASHA, state licensing boards, special education directors, state departments of special education and directors of child health programs for your schools.
  • Consult state-level billing agents on the best way to document services to ensure program integrity.
  • Network with colleagues using telepractice to find out which states currently approve Medicaid funding for telepractice.

There are eight states that reimburse for telepractice services. They include: Colorado, Maine, Minnesota, North Dakota, New Mexico, Ohio, Oregon and Virginia. In addition, reimbursement for telepractice services are pending in California and Michigan.[Note from ASHA editors: This list was published in July 2013, so it may have changed. Our December issue focused on telepractice and has a slightly different list of states offering reimbursement.] 

Contact state speech and hearing associations or state-level Medicaid directors to find out how you can assist in getting Medicaid reimbursement for telepractice services. Let’s work together to ensure students who need our services receive them and schools receive the appropriate funding from Medicaid.

Melissa Jakubowitz M.A. CCC-SLP, vice president of clinical services at PresenceLearning, is an SLP with more than 20 years of clinical and managerial experience, Melissa is a Board Recognized Specialist in Child Language. She is a past-president of the California Speech-Language-Hearing Association and is also active in ASHA, serving as a Legislative Counselor for 12 years. Melissa began her career working in the public schools and can be reached at melissa@presencelearning.com

Beyond Articulation: Don’t Forget Reading

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I have sometimes felt overwhelmed with the number of children on my caseload who struggle with reading.  It shouldn’t surprise me, as spoken language and hearing speech sounds is the foundation for reading text. We know that children with speech and language delays are at risk for reading failure. It’s important for the speech-language pathologist to understand how delays in early sound productions interfere with the process of reading and learn simple interventions to remediate both articulation and early literacy skills at the same time.

It is common to see many children in preschool, kindergarten and first grade struggling with articulation of sounds. Underneath that struggle is a child whose sound/symbol system is weak. That means this system may also be weak in hearing sounds, learning to read sounds and in learning to write sounds. This is the perfect time to get involved with the classroom teacher and use your skills to help all children make sense of sounds and print.  I have found it essential to teach an overlap of skills to the students on my caseload who present with moderate to severe articulation errors.

Reading and speech tips

Here are some general pointers on working on both speech and reading:

  • Review with the kindergarten staff how to teach all students how sounds are made, feel, look and touch as they are introducing alphabet sounds.
  • Talk about where the sounds are made in their mouths. Do they make the sound in the front of their mouth? Do they use airflow? Did their voice turn on or was it off? Was the sound made with their lips or their tongue? This practice helps students connect hearing the sounds to what their mouths are doing when saying them.
  • Teach children the correct way to produce sounds, making sure they don’t begin to add a “schwa” sound like ‘uh” onto the end of their productions. For example, the “f” says /f/ not /fuh/, the “h” says a silent /huh/ not a voiced /huh/, the “t” says /t/ not a voiced /tuh/, the “p” says /p/ not a voiced /puh/ and the “k” says /k/ not a voiced /kuh/. When children learn to produce sounds with the added schwa they may have trouble when they are sounding out words.
  • Be an active participant with the classroom teacher when they begin to assess the letters and sounds a child knows. Offer to help give the assessments and take a close look at the results. It’s amazing what you can learn about a child’s speech sound productions and early reading skills just by a simple sound assessment.
  • Consider an initial sound DVD that is very visual, repetitive and kinesthetically rich. Children can solidify alphabet sounds very quickly when given access to repetitive song-type DVD’s.
  • Phonemic awareness skills taught in the early grades are extremely important for children with speech articulation difficulties. Children need to be able to hear and play with sounds in words. Work with the child on the skills of blending and segmenting simple CVC words using sounds they are working on.
  • Teach classroom teachers and children about voiceless and voiced sound pairs. Make a chart and post it in the classrooms. When children understand how these sounds are related, spelling skills improve.

 

Voice Off Voice On
       f      v
       p      b
       s      z
       t      d
       k      g

 

When a child is reading text

Here are specific things you to can do to help when children read:

  • Use visual reminder cards with children to remind them to use certain reading strategies. A simple strategy card may include strategies such as “Get your mouth ready” or “Say what you see.”
  • “Say what you see” is helpful to say to children when they make an error when reading an initial sound in a word. So when a child is trying to read the word “dog” and he says “fat”, explain that if he sees a “d” in the beginning of the word his mouth has to make that sound.
  • Make simple books with beginning sight words tied to words with the sounds the child is working on. Books like “I see____” or “I like____”. Use blank page books or take a simple book that you own and replace the text with your own, targeting the sounds a child is working on.
  • Every time a child reads out loud they are practicing oral speech sounds.
  • Use highlighter tape to visually highlight the sounds a student is working on. Use the tape in books they are reading or in their writing to draw attention to sounds. Students love to use the tape to cover their sounds while another student in a group is reading.

Sue Lease is a speech-language pathologist at Glacier Edge Elementary School in Verona, Wisconsin. She has a particular interest in emergent literacy in young children.

What It Takes to Get SLPs and Teachers Working Hand-in-Hand

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Lately, I feel there is a division between classroom teachers and speech-language pathologists in the schools: an “us” and “them” mentality. Working parallel to one another hoping to reach the same goal is not what is best for our students. While it is true that the professions are separate, they do share a goal—student progress. I believe collaboration is the key to achieving that mutual goal.

Here are a few of the most common situations in which SLPs and teachers have opportunities to collaborate for the benefit of students, and some tips for those situations.

When a student begins to receive speech-language treatment.

The SLP can:

  • Offer a few minutes to sit down with teachers and walk them through the student’s IEP. Explain the terminology, how speech-language treatment goals will be addressed in the therapy room, and how the classroom teacher can help to target those same goals when the student is in his or her room.
  • Encourage teachers to speak candidly with speech students. The students are in the classroom more than the therapy room. They will progress further when they are supported and encouraged to use speech-language skills and techniques in all environments.

The teacher can:

  • Ask for an opportunity to view a therapy session in person or via a recording. Note hand signals and specific wording the therapist employs. Carefully listen for the correct speech sound productions. Witnessing some of the successful techniques will help when targeting these same needs in the classroom.
  • Support the SLP’s work in the classroom. Students will be motivated to use good speech and language skills when they are aware of shared expectations between the teacher and the SLP.

When the team is gathered for an IEP meeting.

The SLP can:

  • Provide teachers with a short list of items to think about prior to the meeting.
  • Encourage teachers to list areas of observed improvement or areas of need, and reference this list during the meeting.

The teacher can:

  • Speak out about concerns. Some classroom teachers seem to feel they do not know enough about speech-language treatment to comment on progress during IEP meetings. Teacher input contains vital information. Students do not always present speech-language issues in small-group settings.
  • Share in the ownership of the student’s speech/language success. The teacher is an integral part of the IEP team.

When students miss curriculum content because of pull-out services.

The SLP can:

  • Involve teachers as much as possible when creating a speech schedule. A little flexibility here can go a very long way. Be willing to adjust the schedule as needed. For example, push into the classroom for speech one week instead of pulling out, if appropriate.
  • Provide a full (HIPPA-compliant) schedule to teachers highlighting openings for make-up sessions. Keep this schedule updated as the year progresses. You can access a copy of what I use here.

The teacher can:

  • Ask the SLP if having access to lesson plans might be beneficial. Make the lesson plans available to the SLP in advance of the speech sessions.
  • Send classroom materials to be used in treatment sessions. Have a new unit in science? Send vocabulary words with your student to speech. Need help with an oral presentation for English? Send the rough draft to speech. Having trouble with basic concepts or following directions in math class? Let the SLP know. All of these things can be worked into a speech session.

Teachers and SLPs serve the needs of students in different ways, but we are all working on expanding children’s knowledge and skills. When we are cognizant of our colleagues’ needs and comfortable in our roles on the team, collaboration will be the start of something amazing: tremendous student progress.

 

Ashley G. Bonkofsky, MS, CCC-SLP, is a private-practice and school-based SLP in Utah, where her husband is stationed with the U.S. Air Force. She enjoys creating materials for teachers and SLPs and is the author of the blog Sweet Speech (sweetspeech.org). She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Groups 1, Language Learning and Education; and 16, School-Based Issues.

What School SLPs Want to Know

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If you want to know what the real talk is at an ASHA Schools Conference, you need to pull up a chair at the lunch tables. That’s where you’ll hear chatter about the most top-of-mind topics for the speech-language pathologists and audiologists who attend.

So it was that this roving blogger sat down to share a sandwich and some conversation with this year’s attendees. Here’s what a sampling of them report are the most burning issues that brought them to Schools 2014 in Steel City: Pittsburgh.

Brianne Young, SLP, Renfrew, Pennsylvania
I want to know how we’ll use the Common Core State Standards. We’re switching to the Common Core totally but we haven’t yet transitioned the speech-language piece of it 100 percent. We started adapting the reading and language standards last year, and nobody’s sure how this will all work. I also want to know more about incorporating Common Core with RTI.

Amy Shaver, SLP, Hamden, Connecticut
As a former stay-at-home mom just getting back into it—I just got hired fulltime by a school for next year—I want to learn more about iPad apps for speech. The technology has changed so dramatically and rapidly in eight years. It’s kind of an odd place to be because as a mom, technology can seem like a big negative. I’m always limiting my kids’ screen time. So it’s an interesting shift to think of it as an educational tool.

Sabrina Hosmer, SLP, Manchester Public Schools, Connecticut
As a bilingual evaluator, I’m here to find out how other SLPs have made systemic changes to their school districts. In our district we have problems of overidentification of speech-language disorders among bilingual children. The children are tested in English, and they’re not supposed to be, but we don’t have enough bilingual SLPs to do appropriate assessments or to serve the bilingual kids who really do have speech-language disorders.

India Parson, SLP, Prince Georges County, Maryland
What’s on my mind? The Common Core—how do we use the literacy standards with children with severe disabilities? And what’s going to happen with tying them to performance evaluations of SLPs, which they’re doing with teachers and are talking about doing with us? The other issue is the shortage of bilingual therapists. We have a big problem of overidentification of disabilities in the bilingual population. We need folks making better diagnostic decisions up front.

Christine Bainbridge, SLP, Ithaca, New York
What’s burning for me is wanting to learn more about central auditory processing disorder—what is the research evidence base on CAPD, how does it truly change children’s functioning in the classroom, and how do we intervene with it in an evidence-based way?

Audrey Webb, SLP, Charlotte, North Carolina
I’m just coming into the K-12 schools this year after working as a preschool SLP for many years, so what’s going on with the Common Core will be big. Of course, a lot of that’s up in the air now because our state legislature just repealed it, but we’ll still be using it for the time being. I’m also big on RTI. I’m a fan of it, and always interested in ways to get teachers on board with it.

Mary Pat McCarthy, SLP, Clarion, Pennsylvania
My reason for going to Schools every year is always to see what the current buzz is. It’s no one thing I want to know. It’s everything, really. I know if I go, I’ll get what I need for the coming school year. This year I’m especially interested in hearing about working with teachers on improving our work on phonology and articulation with kids. But this conference is always a great professional recharge during the summer.

 

Bridget Murray Law is managing editor of  The ASHA Leader.

Building Language and Literacy Skills During the Lazy Days of Summer

Podcast: Episode 31
Summers mean a break from academics for most kids, but that doesn’t mean learning should stop, particularly for elementary school children who are building so much foundational knowledge. In this podcast, certified SLP Lyndsey Zurawski offers tips and advice for parents about how to stimulate children’s language skills during everyday activities over the break—helping them build literacy skills and setting the stage for long-term academic success. Read the transcript.