Writing an Article for Special Interest Group Perspectives

QWERTY Keys

(photo credit)

You’ve never contemplated writing a research article since you left college, right? Perhaps writing in your field was something someone else did? No time, interest, or motivation to pursue such a professional endeavor? If you have a passion for your work, you can write that article if you simply approach it in steps. Start with your topic and what would you like to share with colleagues. It could be a therapy approach, new information about a specific population, or facilitating your documentation. Start compiling information through your search engines such as Google Scholar and ASHA’s research databases. Start bookmarking abstracts and articles on your topic. You’ll discover there are many facets that you never considered–bookmark those too. As you gather information, you’ll learn more about your subject.

The next step is to paste your facts or paraphrase them from your abstracts and articles including your article’s bibliography into a Word document. You’ll notice there are sometimes two, three, or more authors on a specific facet to your topic. This document will be your working template and will give you a basic framework for your article. Your next step is to review and revise your template into a readable paper. As you edit your paper, you’ll find yourself moving portions of your research from beginning to end, omitting data, and going back to your search engine to pursue that one piece of information you’d like to add.

Once your paper is assembled, ask a colleague to read it to see how the paper flows in form and style. Read it again and revise it again. Now it’s ready to be sent to your Perspectives Editor (find the editor for any Perspectives publication under the heading, “Information for Authors.” Example: SIG 15’s Information for Authors.).

My first article I sent off came back with so many revisions and corrections that I felt like I was back in English 101. I felt deflated and intimidated. My issues included simple grammatical errors, citation omissions, spelling and sentence fragments. The only way I was going to get this information out was to fix my mistakes and improve my first draft. You will feel like giving up. I would recommend that you avoid working on it when you encounter a difficult section, but keep chipping away at it. You will ultimately be rewarded for your efforts, learn a great deal about your topic and professional writing, and have the satisfaction to know you’ve written your first article.

My editor taught me a lot about professional writing and surviving the process of editing and revision. I kept my first draft with revisions to document my growth as a writer and researcher.

Once your revisions are completed, read it again, and ask your colleague to read it again. You’re almost done. You now need to write your article’s abstract and submit five questions about your article’s content for continuing education credits for other SLPs. You can do this!

I want to take this opportunity to acknowledge my colleagues who encouraged me to attempt my first article: Ann Kulichik, owner at AK Speech, past SIG 15 Associate Coordinator who inspired me to write; Joanne Wisely, Vice President, Regulatory Administration & Compliance for Genesis Rehab Services, who reviewed my articles and encouraged me to keep writing; Grace Burke, Senior Director of Adult Day Services at Life Senior Services, who was the previous editor of Perspectives and guided me through my first article with patience and professionalism and Anna Feezor, Senior Clinical Specialist at Genesis Rehab Services and present Associate Editor for SIG 15 Perspectives. Thank you!

George A. Voyzey, M. Ed., CCC-SLP, is a speech pathologist for Genesis Rehab Services at Maine General Rehab and Nursing Care at Glenridge in Augusta, Maine, a 125 bed skilled long-term care facility specializing in Alzheimer’s and other dementia care. Mr. Voyzey also serves as a Master Clinician in the area of dementia, a clinical instructor and mentor. He recently had his fourth article published for ASHA’s Special Interest Division 15 (Gerontology) on-line publication, Perspectives, and serves as a coordinating committee member for SIG 15. Mr. Voyzey received his Master’s degree in Communication Disorders from Pennsylvania State University in 1983. 

Blogging is to Talking, as APA Style is to ?

58499153_e0c220ec61_z

(photo credit)

I’ve found a danger to blogging a lot—someone might like what I’ve chatted about casually and then want me to turn it into an APA style manuscript.  Yep!  That’s happened!  My little ramblings about Google forms have been converted to a formal paper, and are about ready to be submitted electronically to the scholarly folds of ASHA for a peer review and heavy edit.

I’ve learned quite a bit from this:

1.  What is APA style?  The last time I wrote a research paper, I used a typewriter—it was at least an electric typewriter. (Hey, I’m not that old!)  Regardless, writing a paper and submitting it so it looks similar to what I see in my professional journals is a bit of a learning curve.  Fonts didn’t really exist in my world back then.   I’ve never written an ‘abstract’ or worried about including ‘table titles’ or website references.  I’ve spent more than a few hours over the holidays learning about fonts, double spacing, and citations.  (I feel I’m a more than competent speech pathologist—but my job descriptions since graduation in 1984 haven’t really included this.)

2.  What is a SIG (otherwise known as Special Interest Group) in the ASHA world?   I’ve never fronted the money but apparently each SIG has scholarly publications that the members (who pay $35 a year) can read and get CEUs.   I’m hopefully going to be published in one of the SIG publications, although I may not be able to read my own published article since I’m not yet  a member of the SIG.   Maybe I’m not as poor as I think I am.  Perhaps, I’ll turn over a new leaf now, and join a SIG—the one focusing on school-based issues now has me intrigued!   I’ll keep you posted about this.

3.  What is peer review?  I actually already knew about this, but it’s a bit intimidating to submit something I’ve written to be edited and reviewed by people I don’t know.  Right now, I’m using my 22-year-old daughter as my editor, but we think alike and readily critique each other all time about lots of things.  The part about complete strangers reviewing my paper (that I don’t know how to write) is daunting to even consider.  I’m sure that the reality is there will only be a couple of people on a computer that will edit my masterpiece, but my fantasy is that a large group will be earnestly talking about what I wrote. Ha Ha!

So, writing a formal paper is outside of my comfort zone.  Why did I agree to this?  Possibly, I was flattered that anyone even asked.  Possibly, I never say “no” to anything. I need a ready-made script or a social story in this area.

I hope all of you are having a good start to the year! What’s done is done—I said “yes” and this has been great, albeit painful practice, and I’m sure that I’ll have a bit more editing to do.  I’ll let you know how this challenge turns out.

This post is based on a post that originally appeared at Chapel Hill Snippets.

Ruth Morgan is a speech-language pathologist who works for the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools at Ephesus Elementary School. She loves her job and enjoys writing about innovative ways to use the iPad in therapy, gluten-free cooking, and geocaching adventures. Visit her blog at:
http://chapelhillsnippets.blogspot.com.