Kid Confidential: Tips for Working with Students with Hearing Impairment in the Schools

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This month I revisited the topic of classroom difficulties and possible accommodations and modifications for students with hearing loss in the School Matters column of the ASHA Leader.  As there is so much to discuss on this topic, I was unable to share some of the inside tips I have learned when working with students with hearing impairment in the academic setting.  So I thought I would share this information with you today.

Here are the top five lessons I learned when working with students with hearing impairment in the schools:

  1. Work with the student’s audiologist.  I am not a specialist in the area of hearing.  Therefore, every time I have a student with hearing loss referred to me or placed on my caseload, the first thing I do (after reading the audiological evaluation report) is contact the audiologist to ask all of my questions and voice any concerns.  I know, as school-based speech-language pathologists, you struggle to have enough time in the day to do everything you need to do but this is the first and foremost important piece of advice I can give you when working with children with hearing loss of any severity (including children with sound field amplification systems, hearing aids, and cochlear implants-CI).  Audiologists do not expect us as SLPs to know everything about their field.  In fact, they are more than happy to share their wealth of knowledge.  I have learned so much regarding simple tests I can perform for quick assessment of my student’s hearing perception at varying distances to determine how they are perceiving that audiological input (i.e. Ling 6 sound test), how and when to recommend a student with CI to return to their audiologist to once again MAP their CI, what classroom behaviors are evidence of improved hearing and understanding and conversely which suggest possible malfunction of hearing equipment.  Without an audiologist’s guidance, I would not be able to do these things today.
  2. Consult with your district’s teacher of the hearing impaired frequently.  Although, the teacher of the hearing impaired may not be an audiologist, he/she knows the practical strategies and techniques to use while teaching students with hearing impairments in the academic setting.  I have learned how to teach speech and language skills effectively in 1:1 therapy, small group therapy, and in-class therapy for children with hearing loss.  I have learned how to troubleshoot if a hearing aid isn’t working correctly, how to hook up the FM system “boots” to a CI, and what to look for in the classroom and therapy setting that may indicate the need for further analysis of hearing equipment.  Using the teacher of the hearing impaired as a frequent resource to share ideas and answer your questions can be an invaluable and integral part of your therapy plan.
  3. Record in-depth observations:  This is a technique I use to determine if growth is being made in all observed areas even if not specifically targeted on current IEP goals (e.g. improvement in social skills, changes in responding to environmental noises, changes during large group classroom lessons, etc.) or if current progress is not yet quantifiable.  Quality records can help you to share the changes effectively (positive or negative) in your student’s speech, language, or academic skills with the student’s audiologist and hearing impaired teacher to determine the next steps in the therapy process.  I have found emailing my in-depth observations to audiologists for my clients with CI is an enormous help when they are working on MAPping my client’s CI. Parents cannot notice nor may they fully understand the big and small improvements or difficulties a child may exhibit in the school environment.  Therefore, it can be a challenge for audiologists to determine MAPping changes and needs based solely on parent report and child response.  Noting these observations, such as environmental and speech sounds, to which the child no longer responds, assists the audiologist in making the appropriate adjustments to the students CI so as maximal learning can occur.  Don’t underestimate the importance of functional observations.
  4. Get the classroom teacher on board.  Many times classroom teachers just feel lost when expected to appropriately modify for students with hearing loss in their classroom.  They may be anxious about working with this population, which can manifest itself in what seems to be uninterest or even noncompliance.  However, the truth is the classroom teacher may not know what do to and may be looking to you, the SLP, for assistance.  Showing how simple modifications made in the classroom, in real-time, result in improved learning opportunities for their student is one of the quickest ways to get your student’s teacher on board.  Also frequent classroom visits can help you in identify and address additional situations that may be inhibiting your student’s learning (e.g. environmental noises affecting hearing, lack of sufficient visual support in the classroom, classroom instructional language used is too complex, instructor not appropriately amplified at all times, etc.).  Helping to address and make the appropriate changes and adjustments needed in the classroom environment throughout the school year, can be extremely helpful for your student as well as for the classroom teacher.
  5. Do not be afraid to say “I don’t know, but I’ll find out.”  This is the best tool to use when working collaboratively with a number of various professionals.  You can bring your current knowledge and clinical experience to the table, however, no one expects you to know everything about treating every disorder or deficit.  It really is OK to say “I don’t know,” but just make sure you follow that with “but I’ll try to find out for you,” because ultimately classroom teachers, parents, staff members, and other therapists just want to know you are there to help and support them.  Since you already established a great working relationship with your student’s audiologist, I would recommend you start there when you have additional questions you cannot seem to easily answer or research.

Those are my top five tips for working with students with hearing impairment in the school environment.  Do you have additional tips you’d like to share?  Feel free to comment below.

Maria Del Duca, M.S. CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in southern, Arizona.  She owns a private practice, Communication Station: Speech Therapy, PLLC, and has a speech and language blog under the same name.  Maria received her master’s degree from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.  She has been practicing as an ASHA certified member since 2003 and is an affiliate of Special Interest Group 16, School-Based Issues.  She has experience in various settings such as private practice, hospital and school environments and has practiced speech pathology in NJ, MD, KS and now AZ.  Maria has a passion for early childhood, autism spectrum disorders, rare syndromes, and childhood Apraxia of speech.  For more information, visit her blog or find her on Facebook.

Harnessing Learning Styles

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How many times have you heard someone say, “I’m a visual learner” or “I need to do it to understand it.” These are styles of learning. Depending on what research you find, there are 20, 16, 7, etc… types of learning. Among those styles of learning, I have seen a trend of seven to be the most common: visual, aural, verbal, physical, solitary, social, and logical. While some people can strictly use one style of learning, most are a combination. So let us take a closer look at these learning styles and how we can incorporate them into our speech sessions.
1) Visual (Spatial). People who are visual learners learn best when pictures, images, and spatial understandings are used. A lot of our students tend to be visual learners. They benefit from color coding, picture schedules, and graphic organizers to help understand material and process information. Students who are visual learners may benefit from using a story with pictures when addressing listening comprehension or photos of actions being done when working on verb tenses.
2) Aural (Auditory). Those who are aural learners do best when sound (speaking), music, or rhythms are used. These students may remember something best when it is put to a familiar tune or rhythmic pattern. Tapping or clapping out concept/word meanings can be used to help them improve storage and retrieval of information.
3) Verbal (Linguistic). People who are verbal learners prefer to talk out their questions and thoughts to understand. These are the students who may take the ‘long way’ to answer a question because they are ‘talking’ out their thought process. Give them time and listen closely as they explain. Does their explanation make sense? Is there a logical sequence to their thought process? If you are having trouble determining if they are truly understanding, have them write down ( in quick points ) or draw their thought process out as they explain it.
4) Physical (Kinesthetic). Those who are physical learners, learn best by doing and feeling, rather than seeing and hearing. These students can benefit from crafts and activities that relate to their speech and language goals. These students may benefit from performing actions when working on verb tenses or basic concepts/following directions.
5) Logical (Mathematical). People who are logical learners do best when material is presented in a direct, no fuss manner. They pick up on patterns quickly which makes them stronger with numbers (math). When presenting speech and language concepts to logical learners, try and pair the concept with a real-life, relatable example and keep everything as straight forward as possible. If you are targeting pragmatics, emphasizing expected lunch room conversation and behavior, you may choose to have your session in the lunch (if possible) and create the situation you are attempting to address. Be sure to give clear direction and explanation, for example: “Your friend has your favorite cookies in their lunch and you want some. It is rude to take without asking, so if you want some you need to ask politely. Can you show me how to do that?”
6) Solitary (Intrapersonal). Solitary learners prefer to study alone and teach themselves when possible. These students may say they understand a concept when they don’t in order to allow themselves time to look at and process the information in their own way. When introducing a new speech and language concept or area, give these students time to examine the information themselves. This may be difficult due to the length of sessions, but try to provide them some time, at least 5 minutes. Once they have had time with the material invite them to explain it to you. This will allow you establish their understanding.
7) Social (Interpersonal). Those who are social learners prefer to learn within groups and do best when they can bounce ideas of someone. They do well communicating verbally and non-verbally with others. Students who are social learners may enjoy ‘teaching’ a fellow student a concept they are working on. This will require them to focus and understand their own goal to ‘teach’ the other student.
How to Determine Learning Styles
Now that you have some background about some different learning styles, how do you figure out which of these profiles fit your students? Depending on their age there are a few options.
Early Intervention: Just because your clients are young doesn’t mean they don’t lean toward a particular learning style or two. Parent questionnaires and your observations can help to compile information about how to set up your sessions to be engaging and productive while presenting material that fits their learning style. Babyzone has an online quiz for parents to help gather information about what style of learning their little one may prefer.
Elementary: For elementary students, trial and error and parent questionnaires may be used to gather information. Since elementary students are younger and still learning about themselves, getting insight from parents will probably be the most reliable source of information. Once collected, it will allow you to test out some methods in your sessions to find what works best and what doesn’t. Scholastic has an online questionnaire for parents to fill out about their child’s learning style, just make sure the age parameter is set correctly for the child.
Junior High: These students are a bit more mature than elementary, and have had the time and experiences to hopefully learn a bit more about themselves. You may be able to have students fill out basic learning profile questionnaires or quizzes with you. Piedmont Education Services and Edutopia both have short questionnaires that students can fill out with you. Then you can discuss what the results indicated and if the student’s agree. They may even be able to give you suggestions about what they think may help them.
High School: Oh high school students. If you work within this setting I am sure you have been informed how they already know how they can and cannot learn what works for them and what doesn’t. Allow them to humor you and take another look at their learning style. Accelerated Learning has a 35 question quiz to see what learning style characteristics your high school students demonstrate. Who knows, they may learn something new about themselves. I would also suggest including them in discussions about how to target their learning styles.

Maureen Wilson, M.S., CCC-SLP. is a school based speech-language pathologist from Illinois. She also holds a certificate in Inclusionary Teaching. Her blog, The Speech Bubble offers ideas and resources for speech therapists.  You can follow her on Facebook, Instagram, and Pinterest.

How to Put the ‘Super’ in Supervisor

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Being a supervisor in any setting brings to mind a myriad of responsibilities. Is it best to guide or direct, monitor or inspect, influence or manage? As a supervisor to well over 120 speech-language pathologists in school settings during the past 15 years, I have learned a lot about duties and people.

Each situation or SLP calls for different handling at different times, but staying true to one’s own supervisory style is most important, I feel. Consistency helps everyone stay connected and working toward mutual goals.

Over the years I have developed a list of seven skills that have, time and again, helped me stay on track and support staff, even when I really had no idea how to handle a particular situation! If the following list can help even one person, I offer it with humility, as I am still learning and growing:

  1. Listen! Actively listen to staff (and parents!). Do not interrupt or begin to form a response until the person is done speaking. Sometimes people only need to be heard.
  2. Be available. Let staff know how, when, where to find you helps alleviate concerns.
  3. Take responsibility for your actions and for those on your staff. Do what you say you will do.
  4. Give credit where credit is due. Usually the best ideas have come from the staff.
  5. Lead, follow or get out of the way. Okay, I stole this one from Thomas Paine, but it is true. Often it is necessary to lead, but recognize and follow a good idea when it is offered. At times, you have to let a staff member figure out a solution for him or herself (this I learned from a seasoned supervisor).
  6. Stay informed. Stay current with knowledge and skills for your area of the field; it is fine to learn from other staff or supervisors.
  7. ACT. Be accountable, credible, trustworthy

Your list may be very different from mine, and I would be happy to compare notes. Supervision has been, by far, my most challenging and interesting job during my 30+ year career in speech-language pathology. And I am honored to be able to work with a dedicated and professional group of individuals! Each one has taught me valuable lessons about coaching, guiding, monitoring and supervising. The staff is truly the most valuable asset, and, as such, honing one’s supervisory skills is critical to your and their success. Good luck!

Janice Tucker, SLP.D, CCC-SLP, is a supervisor of speech-language support programs in Pennsylvania. She is past president of the Pennsylvania Association of Speech Supervisors and past vice president of the Pennsylvania Speech-Language-Hearing Association. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Groups 16, School-Based Issues, and 18, Telepractice.

Kid Confidential: Teaching Parents the Power of Play

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I don’t know if it is just my experience or if you too have found this to be a problem, but I have noticed the more I work with very young children, the more I realize parents do not actually know how to play with their children.  I know this is a trend I am finding to be true more and more often, however, I am still shocked when I see it.

Play is such an integral part of a child’s development as it affects all areas of growth including, but not limited to, social skills, communication development, cognition, problem solving and reasoning skills, and imaginative thinking.  Therefore, for those of us SLPs who are working with infant, toddler and preschool-age populations it is not just enough to model play or target language development, we must teach parents how to play.  You know the saying “If you give a man a fish, he eats for a day.  If you teach a man to fish, he eats for a lifetime.”  Well I believe this to be similar–we need to teach parents how to play so their children can continue to develop during the time we are not present as service providers and throughout their childhood.

I have noticed that sometimes even involved parents who are willing to participate in book reading and speech and language drill type activities, are still not always comfortable participating in play.  Involved parents want to know what they can do to help.  The problem is they don’t fully understand the importance of play or how their child’s thinking skills change and grow via play.

So what do I do about this?  How do I try to teach parents how to play?  Here are a few techniques I have used:

  1.  Parent education:  The first thing I do is teach parents why play is so important and how learning takes place.  I explain to parents why we need to incorporate play into our therapy and why their child needs to participate in play with them when I am not present. I also explain the types of play their child is currently exhibiting versus what types of play they should be exhibiting at their age (you can find more details on ages and stages of play here).  This truly helps parents fully understand their child’s current level of functioning and why focusing on play skills is so important to communication development.
  2. Never make assumptions:  When I was fresh out of graduate school I made assumptions that parents knew and understood child development.  But the truth is we cannot assume that parents have had the same experiences as we have had.  Even if we are working with parents of a large family, this does not mean they know or fully understand how to play with their children.  I have learned after making many mistakes to never make assumptions about what parents do or do not already know.  Rather than treating parents as if they are in need of education, I will say something like “I would be remiss if I did not explain/show you how to…”.  Other times, I will say something like “I’m sure you already know this but I need to explain that…”.  Again, these are just two ways to help share my knowledge with parents while not treating them as if they are uneducated or making the assumption that they know more than they do.
  3. Model and explain play:  I then create play scenarios at whatever level of play the child is functioning currently while attempting to expand the play and improve language and problem solving skills.  I carefully explain what I am looking for in a child’s play and how I am changing the play slightly in order to achieve those goals.
  4. Give the parents a turn:  It is imperative that I make sure parents have a turn taking over the play interaction.  I want to empower parents and make them feel as if they can play with their child when I am not there.  However, the only way to do that is to make sure they have an opportunity to practice these skills while I’m still there to assist.  If help is needed, I will guide the interactions while continually reducing support throughout the session.
  5. Videotaping for success:  Videotaping parent/child play interactions can be an invaluable way to educate and empower parents.  I like to videotape portions of interactions so parents can refer back to the videos as needed.  When parents see how they have taken suggestions and turned them into positive interactions with their child, they begin to anticipate and invest their time into participating in play more often with their child.
  6. Follow up weekly:  The key to making this technique work is to make sure I follow up with parents and hold them accountable for their child’s play week to week.  I encourage parents to take videos on their smart phones and save them for our next session.  This way I can see the growth in their child and continue to provide assistance as needed.

Parents are always looking for the “right” ways to play.  So I give them a few tips:

  1. Show some emotion:  I explain that parents need to make sure their face, voice and entire body is showing the emotion they want to exude.  So when parents look their child in the eye, smile wholeheartedly and say, “I’m excited to be playing with you today!” or “This is really fun!”, I know they understand the importance of emotional in play.
  2. Play when you can:  Parents often times shut down if they think I am asking them to play for hours a day with their child which ultimately results in no play from them at all.  Instead I ask them to try to play for one or two 15 minute increments a day.  For parents who work full-time and have several children, I have found this to be a more realistic expectation and request from them.  Also encouraging them to involve their other children in play is a stress reliever for some parents as children are great models for each other and many times siblings are vying for their parent’s attention.  Incorporating siblings in play, seems to help provide the much needed parental attention while teaching the whole family how to interact with a child who may have delays.
  3. Turn off the TV and turn on some music:  Parents believe their children do not watch much television however when I ask if parents like to leave the television on for background noise I tend to get more “yes” answers than “no”.  So I encourage parents to get rid of the visual distractions like television and if they must have some background noise, play some child friendly music instead.
  4. Change out toys the child has available to them:  I have noticed even with my own child that when I periodically change out toys available, I see very different types of play.  This can keep a child’s play dynamic and guard against stagnation.
  5. Mix and match toys:  Mixing and matching toys that would not typically go together encourages growth in a child’s imaginative play.  I have seen some amazing pretend play when I brought random toys to therapy for my clients.
  6. Use nondescript toys/objects:  Some of the best pretend play I’ve observed comes from objects that don’t seem to look like anything in particular.  Have you ever placed a few boxes and a bucket of blocks in the middle of a room and watched preschoolers play?  It’s amazing the “thinks they can think”.  The more nondescript the object, the more creativity goes into the play.Parents always ask me if they are “doing it right,”  if they are playing the right way with their child.  My response is always the same “If your child is smiling, laughing or fully engaged with you, then you are doing it right.”

Do you spend time teaching parents about the power of play?  If so, how do you go about it?

Maria Del Duca, M.S. CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in southern, Arizona.  She owns a private practice, Communication Station: Speech Therapy, PLLC, and has a speech and language blog under the same name.  Maria received her master’s degree from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.  She has been practicing as an ASHA certified member since 2003 and is an affiliate of Special Interest Group 16, School-Based Issues.  She has experience in various settings such as private practice, hospital and school environments and has practiced speech pathology in NJ, MD, KS and now AZ.  Maria has a passion for early childhood, autism spectrum disorders, rare syndromes, and childhood Apraxia of speech.  For more information, visit her blog or find her on Facebook.

How To Become a Telepractitioner—Without Going Private

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Working in schools for 23 years was very rewarding for me, but in 2012, I found myself looking for a different avenue for delivering speech-language pathology services. Simply, I was ready for a change.

Therapy sessions seemed to have become more condensed, requiring me to work with groups rather than specific students, which was not always beneficial for them. Incorporating technology into therapy sessions seemed to help my students maintain focus, motivating them to work. Whether I used technology to help students practice articulation drills, writing organization or social skills, they enjoyed it.

Could I find a job opportunity that would allow me to bring together my interests in working from home and using technology to provide speech-language services? The answer seemed to be “telepractice,” also known as “teletherapy.”

I knew leaving my position in the schools would be a bit intimidating. Questions began swirling through my mind: What were the “pros” and the “cons” of leaving my current position? Would it be worth leaving the schools to work from home? Did I want to provide treatment as an employee of a company or as a private provider?

I’ve always wanted to work from home; being able to transport my children to and from school and spending time with them afterward was a major motivator. I’ve also longed for scheduling flexibility that working from home would allow (the ability to throw in a load of laundry between sessions or plan in the evening without needing to drive back to work). But would I miss the staff camaraderie? What about students’ hugs? Would I feel isolated? Since I began providing telepractice treatment, the answer to each of these potential drawbacks has been “no.” To me, the “pros” have far outweighed the “cons.”

I researched telepractice some more on the ASHA website, which reviews studies pointing to teletherapy’s efficacy, and joined ASHA Special Interest Group 18, Telepractice. I later attended a teletherapy training in Maine that tasks that would ordinarily take 60 minutes to complete when providing “onsite” speech/language therapy could be accomplished during approximately 35 minutes of teletherapy!

Next, I considered providing teletherapy as a private practitioner, but I balked at the additional marketing and operational work that would require, even though I knew it would mean being my own boss and making my own schedule.

After careful consideration, I decided to accept an offer to become a teletherapist with a company I knew delivered quality training and treatment. At my company’s direction, I attended American Telemedicine Association-accredited training provided by Michael Towey.

Regarding equipment, I recommend using:

• A laptop with at least a 15” screen and built-in webcam (or you can use an external webcam).
• A headset with attached microphone or external speakers with an external microphone (I prefer a headset because the microphone is always close to the students’ mouths).
• A document camera for use during therapy. You can find most of this equipment on Amazon.

The software I use is a HIPPA-compliant, video-conferencing platform provided by my employer. It is important to consider security and compliance when selecting a Web-conferencing platform (Skype, for instance, is not compliant). Some telepractice companies require that you purchase your own equipment as well as their telepractice software. Be sure to consider that in your research.

For materials, I have found different online resources to draw from: SLP blogs (such as ChapelHillSnippets.com), eNewsletters, and ASHAsphere. I often use my own materials via a document camera. Once I received the necessary equipment and became comfortable with it, I worked on reviewing each student’s IEP, listing goals/objectives for each, and documenting IEP/re-evaluation due dates. Training a paraprofessional was the next step because I needed someone to: chaperone students coming to and leaving from therapy, be a behavior manager as needed, serve as a technology problem-solver, help as a student-response “confirmer,” and be a “skill-carryover” assistant when possible.

Connecting with students via teletherapy has a different “feel” when compared to onsite therapy. While working in the schools, students would draw pictures for me, hug me, and stop in my speech room to see how my day was going. Obviously hugs aren’t available over the Internet, but I have found that there are other ways to connect with students.

Frequently, when students first join the session, their faces light up, and I’ll hear, “Good morning, Mrs. Sippl! What are we doing today?” If my students earn a few minutes of free-choice time at the end of a therapy session, frequently they will ask to draw or color online. Once they’re done, they’ll explain that the drawing is for me and that I need to print it out to hang on my wall. As you can see, the “connection” with students is not lost. It is just different.

Based on my own telepractice experiences, my sense is that students are able to accomplish more in less time compared with face-to-face therapy. Teletherapy has its own rewards, and students find ways to show you how important you are to them. Once, as I was working with a Kindergarten student, she looked at me and exclaimed, “Hi, Mrs. Sippl! I’m so excited to see you today! I love you!”

Tracy Sippl, MS, CCC-SLP, is a Seymour, Wis.-based speech-language pathologist and tele-therapist with Cumberland Therapy Services. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 18, Telepractice. 

Planning a Play-Based Therapy Session

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The big laminate-top kidney tables that many of us have in our school-based “speech rooms” are a great place to run through flashcards, worksheets, read and map stories, answer questions, and teach brand new skills. However, unlike infant–toddler SLPs, for whom playing on the floor is standard, school-based SLPs often overlook opportunities for such play-based therapy.

With play-based therapy, you can really capture a child’s attention and make memories that will extend beyond the therapy session. These memorable moments support learning and retention, and are essential when treatment sessions are infrequent.

Play is flexible, non-literal, episodic and process-oriented. During play, the child is actively engaged and intrinsically motivated. True play has no extrinsic goals, but we sacrifice some of that to ensure that target skills are practiced. When designing play-based lessons, the less you deviate from true play, the better. Here’s how:

Required targets

The first step of planning a play-based therapy session is to select targets to teach. Next, you’ll identify a way to require those targets during play. Start with the lesson, not with the toy or game! You may think in terms of how to give access to something the child wants following skill demonstration. This “something” can be toys, food, parts of a whole (for example, puzzle piece, song phrase, portion of a motor sequence), social interaction, or a funny or amusing consequence. You’ll also have suggested targets that are encouraged but not required. This is because requiring target demonstration at too high a frequency quickly turns the play session into drill-based “work” and begins to peel away the benefits of playful learning.

Example: “Sleepy Sue,” target = /s/-initial words. Let the student choose dolls for each of you. Make your doll’s name “Sue.” Explain that Sue has a pesky tendency to fall asleep (*insert snoring*). When she dozes off, the child’s job is to wake her up by saying, “Sue! …Sue!” You assist with correct articulation, then commence with doll play until Sue falls asleep again. In a short period of play, the word “Sue” will be required many times, but you may also model things Sue and her dolly friends like to do, like sew, sing, or sit—targets that will be suggested but not required.

Memorable episode

The more episodic and story-like your play-based session is, the better. This is because associated events scaffold memories. Later that day, if a child can’t tell mom “what I did in speech today,” you aren’t reaping the benefit of repeated recall. Consider the “Sleepy Sue” example above—the more related the activities that Sue and her doll friends do, the better. It’s too easy to *think* you’re using playful learning, when in reality you’ve set up a nonassociative work–reward–work–reward structure (as with many games).

Memorable targets

In addition to the play episode being memorable, it’s perhaps even more important that the targets be memorable. I’ve used “Sleepy Sue” with a five-year-old who called me out the next session because I accidentally called Sue, “Sam.”And that was great! But a lot of kids wouldn’t remember that target, just like they won’t likely remember many of the target words in a series of flashcards. So I’ve also had “Sleepy Sue” do a cooking episode.

Example: “Sue Makes Soup,”target = /s/-initial words. Sue loves to cook, and the student can help Sue by choosing the ingredients for her soup. The child can add salsa, sausage, seeds, soy sauce, syrup, sour cream, and such. Of these targets, some can be the real thing! And how much fun is it to put real salt or real seeds in the soup bowl? “Salt” and “seeds” can be your required targets, and you hold the shakers until the student needs them. The student may even take some of the “targets” home to show dad. The other words may be required or suggested targets, depending on the student.

Play-based learning can be done with children of any age. What would play-based learning look like for a fifth grader? Start by considering how fifth graders play with one another (for example, talking about their favorite TV show), and design from there. Play-based learning is also excellent for students with autism—check out this article and this one. Whatever the child’s age or skills, always ask yourself—“Could we be playing with this?”


Meredith Poore Harold, PhD, CCC-SLP,
is a speech–language pathologist and independent scholar in Kansas City, Missouri. She works primarily with infant-toddler and elementary-aged children, and provides resources for parents and clinicians at www.meredithharold.com.

Kid Confidential: My Top 10 Reasons for Attending the ASHA Schools Conference

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I know I typically write about some topic related to child development but I thought I would take a detour this month and write about my first experience participating in the ASHA schools conference.  The reason I think this is important is because so many SLPs out there are school-based or work primarily with pediatrics and my experience at the schools conference this year was a very good one full of great insight into various topics, issues and research on child development.

First, let me say that I get no financial or non-financial benefits for writing this article.  So that being said, rest assured this blog post is coming solely from my personal experience and opinions.

This year was the first year in my long career as a speech-language pathologist (yes, you heard that correctly) that I was able to attend the ASHA Schools Conference.  Although I had wanted to go for some time now, between marriage, my husband’s multiple deployments and motherhood, I just couldn’t find the time or financial means to attend before this year.  However, with that said, I had such a wonderful educational experience that I do regret missing out on conferences of previous years and I knew I needed to share with you that it truly is worth saving your quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies over the next year to ensure you can attend.

In an effort not to take myself too seriously and to make this fun for you, I will, like some famous evening talk show host I will not name, give you….(drum roll please)….

 

My TOP 10 Reasons for attending the ASHA Schools Conference:

10.  Location, Location, Location:  Every year it is at a new location in the United States and it’s a nice reason to go check out some parts of the country you might not otherwise ever see.

9.  It’s Some Work and Some Play:  Presentations are over by 3:30 on Friday and Saturday so you have the choice to stay for round table discussions or poster presentations but if you choose not to participate, the rest of the evening is yours to spend sight-seeing.  Sunday, the conference is over by lunch time so you have the rest of the day to grab your camera and officially play tourist.  I was able to head on over to enjoy the beach while the sun was going down one evening, walked about the harbor tourist shops on a Sunday afternoon and strolled along the palm tree lined streets and bike paths with my family.  It was some fun, work, and some super fun play!!!

8.  A Family Affair: I decided to bring along my husband and 3-year-old son on this trip.  They were able to spend some quality Daddy time while I was enjoying the conference and we had some nice family time in the evenings.  It was a win-win situation for me, still having some time to enjoy my summer with my family.

7.  It’s Like Looking in a Mirror:  Have you ever seen a convergence of 1000+ pediatric SLPs on one convention center?  We are all dressed in our khakis and flip flops with our bag of notepads, binders, tablets, pens and pencils slung over our shoulders.  It really is like looking in a mirror and seeing thousands of ourselves out there.  After registration, I was walking back to my hotel room and waiting at the crosswalk were two women who looked like … well me.  So I asked them “Are you SLPs?” and one woman turned around and said “Yes, but that’s a heck of a pick-up line don’t you think?” Ha!  So true!

6.  Feed Them and They will Come:  Yes you guessed it, your registration fee includes (or at least this year included) breakfast each morning, lunch for Friday and Saturday, and snacks.  The food was very healthy and delicious too.  No too shabby!

5.  It’s About What You WANT to Know:  The feel of the schools conference is not about who you know, what researcher you like or who’s work you just finished peer reviewing.  It’s about what you WANT to know.  “What session are you going to next?” was a question I heard often that weekend from strangers who became new found friends because they happened to sit next to each other in a session.  It’s all about what we have come there to learn and what we can share with each other when our sessions are done.  The exchange of educational information for the pure purpose of learning!  Ah, does it get better than that?

4.  The Social Network:  What I love about school SLPs is that although we love our technology, we also love our old school email (strange that email is actually old school now, don’t you think?).  Of the speech pathologists I talked to and exchanged information with, there weren’t any future “tweets” planned or Facebook private messages offered.  It was more of “Shoot me an email when you get back to ____ and we’ll talk.”  So yes, we are able to build our network of SLPs in a way that works for us.  And let’s face it, what SLP can really stick to 140 characters?  Limiting our ability to “talk” is really the worst nightmare for an SLP, don’t you think?!

3.   It’s Not What You Say, It’s HOW You Say It:  The presenters chosen for this conference (I can only speak to the 5 presentations I partook) were down to earth, engaging, interactive and some of them were very, very humorous!  David Hammer, an SLP who presented on CAS, introduced himself by saying he’s NOT an expert but a specialist because he believes he is always learning.  This is one example of how things said really change the dynamic of the session.  Luckily, he was not the exception.  All of the presenters I encountered and talked to were there because they wanted to share their passion for their field with us.

2.  Use Our Time Wisely:  Each presentation was FILLED with useful information, techniques, strategies and therapy activities we can use on a daily basis for a variety of different deficits and disorders.  I was very happy to see that my money and my time was NOT wasted on theory or upcoming research while only spending the last 15 minutes on therapy as many times happens at conferences.  Rather, after every presentation I left with the feeling that I had new tools in my toolbox ready to try in therapy with my clients.

And my number 1 reason for attending the ASHA schools conference is…

1.  It Only Takes a SPARK:  The number one reason I recommend going to the ASHA Schools Conference is because it helps flame the fire and passion we have inside of us for our field.  It only takes a spark, but once our fire gets going, we are hard to stop!

So those are my top 10 reasons for attending the ASHA Schools Conference.  Did you go this year?  What are your impressions?

I have already started saving for next July’s schools conference which incidentally is being held in my old stomping grounds of Pennsylvania.  I hope to see some of you in Pittsburgh next summer!

Maria Del Duca, MS, CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in southern, Arizona.  She owns a private practice, Communication Station: Speech Therapy, PLLC, and has a speech and language blog under the same name.  Maria received her master’s degree from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.  She has been practicing as an ASHA certified member since 2003 and is an affiliate of Special Interest Group 16, School-Based Issues.  She has experience in various settings such as private practice, hospital and school environments and has practiced speech pathology in NJ, MD, KS and now AZ.  Maria has a passion for early childhood, autism spectrum disorders, rare syndromes, and childhood Apraxia of speech.  For more information, visit her blog or find her on Facebook.

Get Some Book Drive Know-How

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In low-income neighborhoods, one book for every 300 children? In middle-socioeconomic status neighborhoods, 13 or more books for every child? I read this jarring statistic and had an epiphany. As a university professor, mother of a school-aged child, and part-time itinerant public school speech-language pathologist, I wondered if there was a way I could help effect change for the low-SES children in my own area?

SLPs all over the United States battle with the problem of students who present with cognitive, linguistic, and executive functioning deficits related to being from low-SES backgrounds. Sometimes these students have genuine, underlying language impairments and qualify for language interventions, but many times they are typically-developing language learners whose language deficits stem from their low-SES status and its accompanying disadvantages. As experienced SLPs, we all know that low literacy skills can have lasting and serious consequences. A shocking statistic indicates that in states such as California and West Virginia, prison cells are built based in part upon the number of third grade students who are reading below grade level. What could I do to help?

I decided to attack the problem of a lack of books for children in low-income homes. I started collecting new and gently-used children’s books in fall of 2008 for a graduate student’s thesis. We collected several hundred books, which she used, and then she graduated from our program. In April of 2009, my beloved mother, Beverly Roseberry, died of a heart attack. Mom had been a general education and Sunday school teacher. In the Philippines, where I grew up (my parents were missionaries), my mom always had books for my sisters and me despite the fact that we were quite poor. On one island we lived on, my mom even started a library for the Filipino children. She loved books, and made sure that my sisters and I did, too! I decided to keep the children’s book collection going in my mom’s memory. Today we have collected and donated more than 43,000 books to local children in under-resourced areas. There are 21 area agencies and organizations receiving our books as well as three elementary schools.

 

July 25

Third grade students at Whitney Elementary School receive books to keep and read during the summer.

It can be discouraging for SLPs who work with at-risk, low-SES children to address the seemingly insurmountable obstacles that these children face. One of these obstacles is the lack of access to age-appropriate reading materials. How can the average SLP gather children’s books to distribute to low-SES children to keep as their own? Here are some tips for being successful:

  1. Have a large, attractive, marked box in a central location that is easy for people to get to
  2. Make the collection time-limited (e.g., 1-2 months)
  3. Have a short flier explaining why books are being collected and who they will be shared with. On the flier, have a contact person with contact information (like an email).
  4. If possible, donate the books locally to groups of children that your audience of donors cares about. For example, the books collected by the Orangevale Rotary go to the Orangevale Food Bank. Books collected by moms in Davis go to Head Starts in Davis. People are most enthusiastic if books stay local and connected to them somehow.
  5. Be sure to pick up the books on a regular basis. Don’t let that box overflow and make a mess!
  6. Challenge your group to collect a certain number (e.g., 100-500 books). People love a numerical goal.
  7. Keep reminding people—announcing the book drive one time will not be sufficient.
  8. At the end of the book drive, celebrate with a treat! Share information about where the books went. If possible, share pictures of children who have received the books.

I have had several undergraduate students in our program gather between 300-800 books just by asking their friends. Members of service organizations such as the Rotary often like to take on a project such as a book drive. Churches are another great source. My own church, Bayside, has donated more than 5,000 beautiful books!

Most of all, remember: people love to donate books for a good cause. I have found that many, many people have children’s books sitting around in their homes gathering dust; however, the people are so sentimentally attached to the books that they cannot just give them to a faceless organization. Having a person specifically attached to the book drive—a face to identify with—helps people become more willing to part with books that hold precious memories. If you are the “face” of your book drive, most people will be very generous in their donations.

A book drive has several major advantages: 1) low-income children benefit greatly from having their own books, and their literacy skills improve; 2) your friends get to clean out those closets, and 3) you get the joy of seeing children own their own books—for many, these are the very first books they have ever owned. Collecting and donating children’s books is something I will do for the rest of my life, and I have been privileged to have tremendous support from my students, church, family, and friends. Good luck!

Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is a professor in Sacramento State University’s Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology and also works directly with students ages 3-18  as a speech-language pathologist in the San Juan Unified School District and has writes a blog about her book drive. She can be reached at sacbookdrive@gmail.com.

Summertime Prep for the School Cafeteria

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Summer!  Ten luxurious weeks of spitting watermelon seeds, munching on veggies straight from the garden and crafting the perfect s’more over the campfire.  As an SLP who focuses on feeding challenges in children, summer food skills are foremost in my mind this time of year.  However, once a week in the summer, my little clients and their families will focus on preparing to eat in the school cafeteria.  Before you know it, it will be mid-August and those little munch bugs will joining their friends at elementary school, or perhaps all-day kindergarten. For kids who are about to go to their very first day of school, it also means their very first day in a school cafeteria, and that can be quite overwhelming, especially for a child in feeding therapy.

Many kids are truly scared of the school cafeteria. In fact, one little boy I worked  with called it “the Café-FEARia.” Imagine a 5-yea- old, on his first day of school, as he tries to negotiate a sea of kids filing into the school lunchroom, attempting to locate his lunch box among 20 others piled into a giant bin and ultimately squeeze into a tiny place to sit at the assigned table. Now, unlatch that brand spankin’ new lunchbox (how does that latch work, anyway?) and peer inside … the clock is ticking … your little munch bug now typically has 20 minutes left to eat, clean up and get back in line with his class; not the most relaxing lunch for any kid.

 

Introduce Weekly Lunchbox Dinners

Feeding therapy is more than just learning the mechanics of biting, chewing and swallowing.  Generalizing skills to multiple environments is essential.  For kids transitioning to school lunch, introduce once a week “lunch box dinners” where the entire family pretends to eat in the school cafeteria.  At the entrance to the kitchen or dining area, one parent stashes a large bin, just like the kids will find at school.  Each member of the family has their own distinct lunchbox thrown into the bin, along with a few “old” random empty lunchboxes so kids can practice digging down to the bottom to find their own.

 

Once everyone is seated at the table, the child can practice the fine motor skills of unzipping zippers, unfastening Velcro® flaps and opening up containers.  Choose a lunchbox that is easy to open and holds all the food in one container.  It saves precious time!  My favorites are Easy Lunchboxes® and Yumbox® , both simple to open and perfect for cutting the food into bite sized pieces.  I call it “grab and gab” food.  Speaking of “gab,” many of my feeding clients also are working on pragmatic skills with their peers, especially when they are in unfamiliar situations.  As an SLP, I teach the parents to practice this little script: “I’ve got ____ in my lunch!”  In all my years of sitting in school lunchrooms and listening to young kids, it’s ALWAYS the first thing they say to each other.  It’s their traditional conversation starter, usually accompanied by them proudly holding up the celebrity food – the star of the lunchbox. I can attest that I hear just as many kids enthusiastically say “I have fruit today!” as “I have (fill in any junk food here) today!”  Try for  the veggies … it’s really okay … it’s just as cool to have vegetables cut up into stars or other fun shapes so they can announce, “I have CUCUMBER STARS today!”  Better yet, get the kids involved packing the lunches and creating fun shapes so they can exclaim “I made carrot triangles for lunch!”  FunBites® are child safe tools for doing just that.  They may not eat them that day, but they will be comfortable with carrots in their lunchbox, and that’s the first step to trying a new food in a new environment.

 

Once the meal is over, everyone latches their lunchbox and puts it back in the bin, just like at school.  The final piece of advice I offer to families is this: The most important word in the phrase family dinner is “family.”  Enjoy this time!  Happy Summer everyone!

Melanie Potock, MA, CCC-SLP treats children birth to teens who have difficulty eating.  She is the author of Happy Mealtimes with Happy Kids and the producer of the kids’ CD Dancing in the Kitchen: Songs that Celebrate the Joy of Food!  Melanie’s two-day course on pediatric feeding is approved by ASHA and includes both her book and CD.  She can be reached at Melanie@mymunchbug.com.

Common Core Suggestions from One Speechie to Another

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As classroom teachers change their teaching to base objectives around Common Core State Standards, we, as speech-language pathologists, must consider the standards as well. It affects us in our identification of language disorders, goal writing, and session objectives.
It is important to consider the CCSS when identifying students through the Response to Intervention (RTI) process. It is important to collaborate with classroom teachers to understand where the students are struggling and which standards they are unable to achieve. Regardless of the RTI tier or level of support the student in question is receiving, we must  determine strategies to help these students acquire these standards necessary for age and grade.
There are a variety of speech and language difficulties that can affect a student’s ability to acquire the CCSS. Some examples of these include:

  • If they cannot use or respond to questions, it will impact their ability to “Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).”
  • If they have weaknesses in vocabulary, it will impact their ability to “Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly.”
  • If they display difficulties comprehending grammatical concepts, it will impact their ability to “Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.”

You should consider what standards are expected for the grade of the student in question and where the student is functioning when developing goals.

So how can you incorporate CCSS philosophies during speech and language sessions? First get a handle on what students are expected to know and understand. This will assist with carryover of skills from the speech room into the classroom and beyond. Here are some ideas to consider:

  • You can have students go on scavenger hunts to help them learn to identify text features of nonfiction texts.
  • Have students practice using higher level thinking: predict, question, visualize, analyze, and make connections.
  • Model for students what to do/think before, during, and after reading by using thought bubbles on a Popsicle stick to help illustrate what one should think and say at each of those phases.
  • Use a KWL chart (know, want to know, learned) when teaching new vocabulary/concepts. Use carrier phrases to teach students how to express key story elements:
  1. “The main characters are…”
  2. “The important events are…”
  3. “The author is…”
  4. “One fact I learned is…”
  • Use thinking notes on Post-Its while reading a story to teach students to generate their own questions while reading.
  • Use a variety of genres when incorporating literacy activities (fables, short stories, poems, plays, biographies, articles, etc.).

For the most part, the CCSS correlate with our typical speech and language goals and objectives. One difference is the expectations for students per grade. Another difference is the language students are expected to recognize, comprehend, and use in the classroom. If classroom teachers are expected to use the vocabulary in the classroom, it is important for our students to hear that same vocabulary in the speech room as well. For students with vocabulary weaknesses, they may need extra assistance in learning this vocabulary and terminology. Some important vocabulary words and concepts that we, as Speech-Language Pathologists should incorporate into our sessions and make sure our students understand include:

  • Evidence
  • Central idea
  • Point of view
  • Plot
  • Audience
  • Analyze
  • Dialogue
  • Theme

Whether you are identifying students that could benefit from speech and language services, developing goals, or creating treatment plans,you as an SLP working with school-aged students need to consider the CCSS. It will help advocate how a student will benefit from speech and language services as well as justify for those that are ready to graduate. It also will help make speech and language sessions more academically relevant and easier to promote generalization into the classroom.

“Miss Speechie” is a licensed speech-language pathologist working in a public elementary school in New York State. She is the author of the blog, Speech Time Fun. She enjoys creating and sharing materials, resources, ideas for speech-language pathologists.