Kid Confidential: Teaching Our Kids About “Tricky People”

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We’ve all heard of “stranger danger” and have probably taught our own children about the concept.  Don’t go anywhere or get into a car with anyone you don’t know.  As speech-language pathologists we may have even discussed this as part of our safety topics along with fire safety, learning about law enforcement and teaching our students how to dial 911.  We may even talk about “stranger danger” when we are targeting problem solving and reasoning skills for those students with social communication or cognitive delays.   But is “stranger danger” the best way to teach our children to be aware of adults, teenagers, or even same age peers that may hurt them?  According to the American Psychological Association’s web article, titled “Child Sexual Abuse: What Parents Should Know,” 30% of predators of sexual abuse are family members, while it is estimated that an additional 60% of predators are non-family members but are known to the child (i.e. family friends, caregivers, neighbors, etc.).  Considering 90% of all child sexual abuse cases occur by someone the child knows, is “stranger danger” really accurate?  I’m not so sure anymore.

I recently became aware of Safely Every After, Inc, a company devoted to child safety that focuses on teaching children and adults ways to identify the “tricky people” in our lives because many times “tricky people” are not strangers at all.  Pattie Fitzgerald, owner of Safely Every After, Inc., has been advocating for child safety for more than 10 years and has a number of wonderful free resources on her website including prevention tips, red flags for parents/adults, safety rules for children, internet safety rules and cyberbullying guidelines.  Pattie educates children of all ages as young as 3 years of age.  For preschool age children (3-5 years), she has written a book titled, No Trespassing-This is MY Body!, which discusses what “thumbs up” and “thumbs down” touch is and that children are the “boss of their own bodies.”  She also presents her information to schools and offers workshops for children grades K-4 (Kidz-Power) and grades 5-8 (Play it Safe!).  Additional workshops for kids and adults such as Internet Safety and Social Media and Protect the Children You Teach geared toward educators and school staff are also available.  If you think your school could benefit from a presentation by Pattie, feel free to refer your administrator to her website for more information.

So who are “tricky people”?  According to Pattie, here are just a few red flags that you are with a “tricky person”:

  1. This person continually tries to arrange for “alone time” with children;
  2. He/she befriends one particular child and lavishes gifts upon him/her;
  3. He/she frequently offers to babysit or “help out” for free;
  4. He/she insists on being physical with a child especially when the child seems uneasy or has asked the person to stop; and
  5. He/she blurs boundaries of physical touch or uses inappropriate words to comment on a child’s looks or body.

Tricky people can be a stranger or someone the child knows.  A tricky person can be a friend of the child’s parent or a family member.  Tricky people are everywhere and we need to listen to our instincts when we get that “uh-oh” feeling.  These are the things Pattie and her crew at Safely Every After, Inc., advocate teaching children and adults.

Granted, as SLPs in schools, clinics, and private practice, we may not be permitted to discuss the topics of touch with our students depending on parental preference.  However, we can discuss and teach general safety rules.  For example, the second rule on Pattie’s “Super-Ten Safe-Smart Rules for Kids and Grownups” is that a child must know his/her name, address, phone number, and parents’ cell phone numbers in case of an emergency.  We as SLPs do work on having our students answer biographical information questions so this rule works perfectly within our therapy goals.  A few more examples of rules that would go nicely with targeting problem solving and reasoning skills are rules three, four, and five that state “Safe grownups don’t ask kids for help.  They go to other adults for assistance,” or “I never go anywhere or take anything from someone I don’t know no matter what they say,” and “I always check first and get permission before I go anywhere, change my plans, or take something even if it’s from someone I know.”  There are several other safety rules that can be discussed when targeting reasoning and problem-solving skills in a safe way and I encourage you to read all about them on Pattie’s website.

So why, during ASHA’s Better Speech and Hearing Month, am I discussing the topic of child safety?  Well, who better to modify and explain child safety rules to our communication-delayed children, than SLPs?  Who better to determine if our children have the capacity to communicate when and how they have been hurt? Who better than the programmers of our non-verbal students’ AAC devices, to make sure there is language available for our students to express when they are hurting?   Who better, than us, to prepare our students for safety over the summer months?  In fact, we, as SLPs, may be the first adults to successfully broach the topic of safety with our students as we can modify and adapt information to the child’s level of comprehension.  So my question is, who better than us?

Disclaimer:  I am not, nor have I ever received payment or any form of compensation from Pattie Fitzgerald or Safely Ever After,Inc. for writing this blog article.  My purpose for writing this article is purely for educational purposes to share the knowledge I have recently learned and found on this website.  Use this information at your discretion.

 

Maria Del Duca, M.S. CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in southern, Arizona.  She owns a private practice, Communication Station: Speech Therapy, PLLC, and has a speech and language blog under the same name.  Maria received her master’s degree from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.  She has been practicing as an ASHA certified member since 2003 and is an affiliate of Special Interest Group 16, School-Based Issues.  She has experience in various settings such as private practice, hospital and school environments and has practiced speech pathology in NJ, MD, KS and now AZ.  Maria has a passion for early childhood, autism spectrum disorders, rare syndromes, and childhood Apraxia of speech.  For more information, visit her blog or find her on Facebook.

Crafty Apps for Language-Based Therapy

It is no secret; I have never been a crafty person. During my days in graduate school I struggled a lot with the fact that many of my peers were able to spend hours creating these amazing therapy activities with glue and various types of paper. Yes, I did question my ability to become a speech therapist when I saw one of my colleagues bring the cupcakes she had baked at home along with all these amazing cupcakes decorations for the session. I clearly was not capable of such a thing!  Oh, and of course there are the scrap-booking SLPs! Clearly, I had no idea that SLPs had to dedicate hours preparing meals, buying scrap-booking materials and other tools for various “crafty therapy sessions”. In graduate school, I appealed to my technophile side to create my sessions around my computer. I know what you are thinking…  “What about the iPad?”. I didn’t even own an iPhone while in graduate school (and the iPad was still years from being invented). Today’s post is dedicated to all my fellow speech therapists and teachers who lack “craftiness” and want to be crafty on the iPad! Blessed be the iPad!

Here are some of my favorite apps for fun, creative, and open language based therapy sessions:

1. Art Maker by ABC’s Play School ( $0.99) – Prepositions, vocabulary and more.

This application allows you to create scenes by selecting from various background options and pieces of craft that go with the theme.  You can also pick from your own photos and add various pieces of provided objects and crafting materials to your photo (see how non-crafty I am based on the photo below). The images are added to your photos. For those of you feeling a little adventurous you can even make a movie as you move the items around the screen. You can use this app for promoting language skills and vocabulary. Prepositions (put the star on her shirt, put the tree next to the dog, etc.) is also a great target to use this app for.

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2. Martha Stewart Craft Studio ($4.99) – Story re-telling and sequencing in one place.

This app is worth every penny I spent on it, I just wish I had it 6 years ago! The Martha Stewart app is very easy to use and offers so many possibilities. It allowed a non-crafty person like me to create a scrapbook page! The app comes loaded with possibilities. You can take photos of the students during the session or send a letter to the parents to send some family photos with the kids for the upcoming session. It is an amazing way for working on retelling a story and it is perfect for those sessions with adults! After you create each page you can print and send it home with the child. This is by far a much more cost efficient way to do a crafting session.

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3. ScrapPad- Scrapbook for iPad ( Free + buy in app) – Vocabulary &  following directions at no cost.

This app is very similar to the Martha Stewart application. It has several background, stickers, borders and embellishments you can add to each page you create. Using this app can be great for vocabulary as well as for following directions. Just like the previous app, you can also save the final work onto your photos and print them when you are done.

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4. Hello Cupcakes (Free + buy in app) – Great app for following directions with amazing visual support.

This fourth app is truly a helping hand for those who want to do a real life cupcake but are not as talented as most of my former co-workers. The app comes with a baking tray which gives you information on which materials you will need to create the cupcakes. This app is just phenomenal; it includes step by step photos you can use for creating each cupcake. The cupcakes can be quite elaborate but this app has so many amazing visuals and it will guide you and your students to create quite the cupcake project. This is the perfect app to guide students, especially students who can benefit from visual support, for working on following directions. The app has amazing visual details. The buy in app options offer a variety of themed cupcake options too.

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It turns out that not only I can be crafty, but I love being crafty on the iPad! Should I call myself technocrafty?

Barbara Fernandes, M.S; CCC-SLP is a trilingual Speech- Language pathologist, a geek  and an app developer. She is the founder and CEO of Smarty Ears Apps , a company that creates apps for speech therapy. Barbara is also the face behind GeekSLP TV, a blog and video podcast focusing on the use of technology in speech therapy. Barbara has also been a practicing speech therapist both in Brazil and in the United States. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Groups 16, School-Based Issues, 12, Augmentative and Alternative Communication, and 1, Language Learning and Education. Barbara has created over 21 applications for the mobile devices for speech therapists. Find her at GeekSLP.com or on Twitter at @geekslp.

Blogging is to Talking, as APA Style is to ?

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I’ve found a danger to blogging a lot—someone might like what I’ve chatted about casually and then want me to turn it into an APA style manuscript.  Yep!  That’s happened!  My little ramblings about Google forms have been converted to a formal paper, and are about ready to be submitted electronically to the scholarly folds of ASHA for a peer review and heavy edit.

I’ve learned quite a bit from this:

1.  What is APA style?  The last time I wrote a research paper, I used a typewriter—it was at least an electric typewriter. (Hey, I’m not that old!)  Regardless, writing a paper and submitting it so it looks similar to what I see in my professional journals is a bit of a learning curve.  Fonts didn’t really exist in my world back then.   I’ve never written an ‘abstract’ or worried about including ‘table titles’ or website references.  I’ve spent more than a few hours over the holidays learning about fonts, double spacing, and citations.  (I feel I’m a more than competent speech pathologist—but my job descriptions since graduation in 1984 haven’t really included this.)

2.  What is a SIG (otherwise known as Special Interest Group) in the ASHA world?   I’ve never fronted the money but apparently each SIG has scholarly publications that the members (who pay $35 a year) can read and get CEUs.   I’m hopefully going to be published in one of the SIG publications, although I may not be able to read my own published article since I’m not yet  a member of the SIG.   Maybe I’m not as poor as I think I am.  Perhaps, I’ll turn over a new leaf now, and join a SIG—the one focusing on school-based issues now has me intrigued!   I’ll keep you posted about this.

3.  What is peer review?  I actually already knew about this, but it’s a bit intimidating to submit something I’ve written to be edited and reviewed by people I don’t know.  Right now, I’m using my 22-year-old daughter as my editor, but we think alike and readily critique each other all time about lots of things.  The part about complete strangers reviewing my paper (that I don’t know how to write) is daunting to even consider.  I’m sure that the reality is there will only be a couple of people on a computer that will edit my masterpiece, but my fantasy is that a large group will be earnestly talking about what I wrote. Ha Ha!

So, writing a formal paper is outside of my comfort zone.  Why did I agree to this?  Possibly, I was flattered that anyone even asked.  Possibly, I never say “no” to anything. I need a ready-made script or a social story in this area.

I hope all of you are having a good start to the year! What’s done is done—I said “yes” and this has been great, albeit painful practice, and I’m sure that I’ll have a bit more editing to do.  I’ll let you know how this challenge turns out.

This post is based on a post that originally appeared at Chapel Hill Snippets.

Ruth Morgan is a speech-language pathologist who works for the Chapel Hill-Carrboro City Schools at Ephesus Elementary School. She loves her job and enjoys writing about innovative ways to use the iPad in therapy, gluten-free cooking, and geocaching adventures. Visit her blog at:
http://chapelhillsnippets.blogspot.com.

The Motherlode of Organization

I was talking recently to another SLP and of course we were exchanging ideas about how to get organized at the beginning of the year. So I thought I’d share my tried-and-true system with you. It has taken me several years to get to this point, and it will likely continue to evolve.

Data

I have a crazy system, but I find that it has worked well, especially since I revamped it last year. I group my students, and each group gets a two-pocket slash folder like these:

Once upon a time, I put the folders into binders, but the binders grow too large throughout the year, and become more cumbersome. So I ditched the binder, and opted for an accordion file with a handle to keep them in.

It is similar to this one from Walmart. They’re easy to grab and put back as I need them. I just put them in the order that I will see my groups, and voila!

Ok, so what’s in the folders?

First, the front pocket: For each individual student, I have a data page. This includes the student’s name and date of birth, and 5 sections of notes. Each section is identical and includes: the objective targeted, room for data and notes, an indication of group or individual therapy, start/stop time for group, and selections for student or clinician absence/meetings/special activities (assemblies and field trips).

In the back pocket is a copy of each individual student’s IEP goals and any other pertinent info I might need at a moment’s notice. I had a student with a seizure plan one year, so I kept that handy in his folder in case he had one during speech. Thankfully, I never had to refer to it. :-)

Attendance

I find it easiest to nab one of those beautiful teacher gradebooks to use for attendance. I photocopy the pages so I have a set for each quarter. The pages look similar to this:

I have come to love this system. I can easily know who I saw on what day and for how long with a code system I have developed. For each student, I denote G= group, I= individual, A= student absent, CA= clinician absent, CM= clinician in meeting, S=special activity (such as fire drill, field trip, or whatever). Most of my groups are the same duration, so I don’t denote that unless it’s different for some reason. So, I may denote “I” for individual therapy with my standard time frame, or “I45″ to indicate individual therapy for 45 minutes. For clarification, I can refer back to the daily data sheets (from above). At the end of the day, I just zip down the list, and presto, I’m done wth attendance!

Medicaid billing

From this attendance roster, I highlight students that I must bill Medicaid and can zip through my list pretty quick. And bonus, I can tell at a moment’s notice how long it is until I have the daunting task of quarterly IEP updates. I start those puppies two weeks out so I can chip away at them and finish in time.

Materials

I try to use the same activity for most of my groups all day, although sometimes, depending on what I need to target, I may have something different up my sleeve for a few groups. Then, I just gather the other materials I may need, such as articulation or vocabulary cards, books or other visuals, or any manipulatives necessary. I keep all of that within an arm’s reach of where I sit in my room. This year, I share my office, and don’t have the luxury of my nice big assessment cabinet by my side like I did last year, so I’ll have to use some real estate on my desk.

OK, that was a TON! Thanks for hanging in there till the end! If you have any questions, please comment below. Did I leave something out? Just ask! I’m also interested in your system. What do you do? Do you think it’s the best system ever? Let me know! I’m always looking for a way to make the day-to-day operations easier.

This post originally appeared on Adaptable, Flexible, & Versatile Speech-Language Therapy.

Karen Dickson, MA, CCC-SLP/L is in her fifth year as a Speech-Language Pathologist. Currently, she works for Valley View School District in Bolingbrook, Illinois. She provides speech-language services to students in pre-school through fifth grade. She has recently been inspired to start her own blog and invites you to visit her site at  http://afvslp.blogspot.com.

Private Practice- Will You be a Survivor?

Money Money Money

Photo by Images_of_Money

“A recent survey by Accenture has shed light on the matter of shrinking numbers of medical private practices and has revealed that especially small private practices are on the decline. The survey also shows that individual practitioners are in declining at the rate of two percent annually and would decline by five percent annually by the year 2013.” (Excerpt from Private Practices Surviving Healthcare Reforms:  Revenue Management.)

The glamour associated with private practice is often shrouded in the gut-busting challenge of juggling business and clinical demands. Dealing with downward payment trends and increasing management of services resulting in the need for more clients.  What is the key to being a private practice survivor?

In a word: REVENUE.

Generating revenue is key to growing your business & managing it is equally essential!

What are four ways that practitioners need to focus on revenue generation?

  1. Identifying your target market
  2. Creating & sharing your brand message
  3. Leveraging your relationships
  4. Jumping into an integrated personal and social media marketing approach and grow your business

What are the five ways we can optimize revenue?

  1. Understand your  costs, pricing and contracting
  2. Identify the key practice metrics you will monitor
  3. Master coverage issues & opportunities
  4. Establish patient payment policies & parameters
  5. Create systems to insure proper billing, documentation & receivable management

You can be a survivor & thrive in the next phase of practice!

 

Interested in this topic? Lynn Steffes is presenting at ASHA Health Care/Business Institute 2012, taking place April 28-29 in Memphis, Tennessee. Visit the ASHA website for conference information and to register–early bird registration ends March 13 so don’t delay!

 

Lynn Steffes, PT, DPT is president/consultant of Steffes & Associates, a nationwide rehabilitation consulting service based in WI. Her areas of expertise include marketing and program development, customer service initiatives, managed care contracts and payer relations, and optimal reimbursement and documentation strategies. Steffes is a 1981 graduate of Northwestern University and completed her transitional DPT in December of 2010. In addition to her work as a consultant, she is a frequent speaker at national and state meetings. She is an active member of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) and serves on the board of directors for the private practice section of APTA.

Forging Ahead–A Private Practice Checklist

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Photo by Diego3336

(This post originally appeared on Activity Tailor)

Hooray! You’ve decided to take the plunge and start working for yourself. Now it’s time for some organization:

  1. Proper mind set: Grab a glass of wine or a cup of tea. Dream! What do you want out of this venture right now? What do you want in 10 years? Having some sort of framework for your business will help you make a lot of the decisions that lie ahead. Hey while you’re at it—write those dreams down!
  2. State license: I’m assuming your CCCs are all in order, but depending on your state and/or previous place of employment you may not be licensed by your state speech-language-hearing board. A quick phone call can save you future heartache. Most state boards will simply require proof of your degree, ASHA certification and yearly dues, but it may take some processing time. Also, be sure to find out if there are different ceu requirements. In my state, I was able to file a petition so my state and national continuing ed intervals ran concurrently.
  3. Pick an Entity: This is a fancy name for deciding how your business will be set up. You may choose to have your business income show directly on your personal income tax (sole proprietor) or establish a LLC and have the business as a completely separate enterprise. This is something to discuss with your accountant to determine the best decision for you. Invest in advice!
  4. City license/permit: I filed my “dba” (doing business as) name at the register of deeds and then applied for a city business license. Each year I’m required to calculate my gross income from services and/or goods and pay fees to the city. A dba might be “Kim Lewis, M.Ed. CCC-SLP” or “Activity Tailor”. Consider your decision. Your personal name might be very recognizable, but will it limit you if you hope to add clinicians or goods one day? Should you check if it’s an available domain name?
  5. Business banking account: You’ll want to keep your business transactions (income and payments) separate from your personal accounts. In all likelihood a checking account will suffice. However, if budgeting is not a strong suit you may want a savings account attached as well. Remember, you’ll be responsible for all your taxes at the end of the year. Transfer the estimated amount (based on that month’s earnings) on a monthly or quarterly basis if you think this will be a problem otherwise.
  6. Employer Identification Number (EIN): You or your accountant will need to apply for this with the IRS even if you are your sole employee.
  7. Malpractice insurance: You may already have this even if your employer provided some, but now that you work on your own, make sure you are covered. ASHA provides discounted rates that are very reasonable.
  8. Pricing research: Call around to some local practices and get information on pricing for both evaluations and therapy. Make sure you establish a rate that’s commensurate—don’t try to undercut the market; we all pay for that! Work out a fee schedule for various evaluations (i.e. screening vs. full eval) and therapy sessions (i.e. 30 or 45 min).
  9. Determine your wage: Be disciplined and set yourself an hourly wage. Just remember, in private practice you are only paid for patient contact hours. ***when I began to explain this item in detail, it became too huge to include here. I will post this separately in the next couple of days.
  10. Create forms and policies: OK, this is the part I dislike most, but it still needs to be dealt with—the paperwork. (*** Again, this is a line item in which the explanation went out of control. I’ll list what you need here, but will post in more detail within the week.) You will need at least the following: fee schedule, billing policy, cancellation policy, privacy policies, case history, insurance claim forms, treatment notes, monthly progress notes, evaluation summary form.
  11. Marketing Materials: At a minimum, you’ll need a business card with your contact info and perhaps space for noting appointment times, but you might also consider envelopes, letterhead or a marketing brochure. A local print shop can assist with a logo. ASHA.org has predesigned stationary that you add your info to for a reasonable price.
  12. Therapy/Evaluation Materials: This can quickly become an expensive endeavor. Tests and their forms can be quite pricey (anyone with great ideas for scoring bargains—let us know!) I would suggest purchasing the 2-3 you’ll need most frequently and adding as you see fit. Therapy materials are usually more economical and, again, you can add as you go.
  13. Make a Plan: Brainstorm some ideas for finding clients. This might include contacting local schools, pediatrician’s/doctor’s offices, or local social agencies. An ad in a local magazine might be helpful. Offer to give an educational talk at a mom’s group or senior center.
  14. Find Support: You’ll have some exciting and scary days ahead. Share it! Another private therapist willing to mentor you would be fabulous, but don’t underestimate an encouraging friend. For me, a positive attitude with limited knowledge would help me more that an experienced, but dour, practitioner.

Ask questions and good luck!

 

Kim Lewis M.Ed, CCC-SLP has a private practice for pediatrics in Greensboro, NC. She is the blogger at www.activitytailor.com, providing creative ideas for speech therapy, and the author of the Artic Attack workbook series.