Snow Day Recap

AugustSnowman

It’s a snow day here at ASHA and for many of our members on the East Coast. So whether (pun intended!) you’re snowed in or not, curl up with some of our most popular posts from 2014 in this compilation published earlier this year.

 

From stuttering to aphasia, hearing loss to hearing aids, early intervention to telepractice and more, ASHA’s blog posts are written by you—our members—sharing knowledge with peers on a variety of subjects. But there’s no doubt about it, pediatric feeding has been the topic on ASHAsphere in 2014!

Check out your five favorite posts from last year:

Step Away From the Sippy Cup!

SLP Melanie Potock specializes in pediatric feeding and explains that sippy cups were created to keep floors clean, not as a tool to be used for developing oral motor skills.

“Sippy cups were invented for parents, not for kids. The next transition from breast and/or bottle is to learn to drink from an open cup held by an adult in order to limit spills or to learn to drink from a straw cup. Once a child transitions to a cup with a straw, I suggest cutting down the straw so that the child can just get his lips around it, but can’t anchor his tongue underneath it.” – Potock

Baby Led Weaning: A Developmental Perspective

For parents interested in following the Baby Led Weaning (BLW) philosophy of pediatric feeding, which states that babies are developmentally capable of reaching for food and putting it in their mouths at about 6 months of age, SLP Melanie Potock shares some thoughts to consider.

“For children in feeding therapy, incorporating some aspects of BLW is dependent on that child’s individual delays or challenges and where they are in the developmental process, regardless of chronological age. My primary concern for any child is safety—be aware and be informed, while respecting each family’s mealtime culture.” – Potock

Collaboration Corner: 10 Easy Tips for Parents to Support Language

Paying attention to body language, reading every day and using pictures are just a few tips SLP Kerry Davis shares with parents to support their child’s language development.

“Take pictures of your child’s day and talk about what is coming up next, or make a photo album of fun activities (vacation, going out for ice cream) to talk about.” – Davis

What SLPs Need to Know About the Medical Side of Pediatric Feeding

To overcome pediatric feeding problems, SLP Krisi Brackett explains the importance of first figuring out why the child’s in a food rut.

“Whether the child is dependent on tube feedings, not moving to textured foods, grazing on snack foods throughout the day, failing to thrive, pocketing foods or spitting foods out, using medical management strategies can greatly improve a child’s success in feeding therapy.” – Brackett

Preventing Food Jags: What’s a Parent to Do?

For kids who only eat a limited number of foods, it can be difficult for parents to provide the right nutrition for their kids. SLP Melanie Potock shares her top 10 suggestions for preventing food jag.

“Food Left on the Plate is NOT Wasted: Even if it ends up in the compost, the purpose of the food’s presence on a child’s plate is for him to see it, smell it, touch it, hear it crunch under his fork and  perhaps, taste it.  So if the best he can do is pick it up and chat with you about the properties of green beans, then hurray!  That’s never a waste, because he’s learning about a new food.” – Potock

 

ASHA always welcomes new blog contributers. Interested? Apply to here become an ASHAsphere blogger.

Sara Mischo is the web producer at ASHA. She can be reached at smischo@asha.org.

Know Your CAS

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When I was pregnant, I remember dreaming about my new baby. My husband and I wondered aloud if she would be a musician like him, an athlete like me, or have some individual talent all her own. We had absolutely no doubts about what strong communications skills she’d have, however. Her mother was an SLP after all.

During her first year, my daughter lagged in all developmental milestones. I went to at least five different conferences on early intervention, but I couldn’t figure out why my daughter wasn’t a chatterbox. She met her first word criteria at one saying “hi” to everyone she met.

My husband’s mother reported he was late to talk and didn’t really say much of anything until after two. I had heard of late talkers, but because I worked at the elementary level, I never treated preschool kids. I brushed aside my pediatrician’s suggestion to seek treatment because I was convinced my daughter must be like her Daddy and that I could help her.

I finally took her in for an evaluation when she was close to three and received a diagnosis of childhood apraxia of speech and global motor planning deficits. After starting therapy based on motor learning principles, she made progress immediately.

Upset that I missed this diagnosis in my own child, I went on to endlessly and obsessively research childhood apraxia of speech. I was disappointed to find maybe eight pages on the subject in my graduate school materials. I know CAS is rare, but SLPs need to know about it and need to have the tools to diagnose and treat it correctly.

That summer I attended the national conference for CAS. The next summer I applied and was accepted into the Apraxia Intensive Training Institute sponsored by CASANA, the largest nonprofit dedicated exclusively to CAS. I was trained under three leading experts: Dr. Ruth Stoeckel, David Hammer and Kathy Jakielski.

If I could get one message out to pediatric SLPs, it would be for them to research and become familiar with the principles of motor learning and change their treatments accordingly for a client with CAS or suspected CAS. I know many like me get so little training or even information on it in graduate school. I’ve met other SLPs who were told it was so rare they would probably never treat it or even that it didn’t exist.

ASHA recognized CAS as a distinctive disorder in 2007. Taking the time to learn more about how treatment for childhood apraxia of speech differs from other approaches for speech and language disorders is crucial for kids with this motor speech disorder.  The importance of a correct diagnosis leads to a successful treatment plan. To briefly summarize, sessions should focus on movement sequences rather than sound sequences taking into account the child’s phonetic repertoire and encouraging frequent repetition.

For more information visit apraxia-kids.org and become familiar with ASHA’s technical report on the subject.

 

Laura Smith MA, CCC-SLP is a speech/language pathologist in the Denver metro area specializing in childhood apraxia of speech. CASANA-recognized for advanced training and expertise in childhood apraxia of speech, she splits her time between the public schools and private practice. She speaks at conferences and consults for school districts or other professionals. Email her at lauraslpmommy@gmail.com, Like her on Facebook, follow her on Pinterest, or visit her website at SLPMommyofApraxia.com.

 

 

Picky Eaters in the Preschool Classroom: 7 Tips for Teachers

Two scoop sizes allow children to select a smaller portion for unfamiliar foods.

Two scoop sizes allow children to select a smaller portion of unfamiliar foods.

As a pediatric feeding therapist, part of working in the child’s natural environment is making regular preschool visits to offer teachers and staff guidance when a child is not eagerly participating in mealtimes. Whether a child is a selective eater or the more common picky-eater, here are seven tips for teachers that focus on the seven senses involved in food exploration and eating:

  1. Sight: New foods are better accepted when the sight of them is underwhelming. When serving foods family style, include TWO utensils for scooping from the main bowl or platter [see above]. Present each food with one larger scoop and a standard spoon. The kids at the table can choose which scoop/spoon they would like to use, which allows the more hesitant eater to choose a small sample instead of what might feel like an overwhelming shovel-full. If meals are served pre-plated, offer smaller portions (1 tablespoon) of new foods and allow the kids to request more after their first taste.
  2. Smell: Warm foods often have a stronger aroma and for some kids, this can be a quick turn-off before the food ventures toward their lips. In regards to the hesitant eater, begin passing the bowl of warm foods so that it ends up at his seat last, when it will be less aromatic. For meals that are pre-plated, simply dish up his first but place it in front of him last, so that the food has time to cool a bit. Straws are an excellent option for soups, because they allow the child to sample by sipping. The longer the straw, the farther away they are from the smell. The shorter the straw, the less distance the soup needs to travel to reach the tongue, but the closer the nose is to the aroma. Consider what suits each child best and adjust accordingly. Thinner straws allow for a smaller amount of soup to land on the tongue, but if the soup is thick, you may need a slightly wider straw. Keeping the portion as small as possible also keeps the aroma to a “just right” amount for little noses. Try tiny espresso cups, often under $2, for serving any new beverage, soup or sauce.
    espresso cups
  3. Taste: Experiencing food doesn’t always mean we taste it every time. If the best a hesitant eater can do that day is help dish up the plates or lick a new food, that’s a good start! But when it comes to chewing, encourage kids to taste a new food with their “dinosaur teeth.” A fun option are these inexpensive tasting spoons commonly found in ice cream shops. Keep a small container in the center of the table for kids to take tiny sample tastes direct from their plates.
    tasting spoons
  4. Touch: Like any new tactile sensation, few of us place our entire hand into a new substance with gusto. It’s more likely that we’ll interact with a new tactile sensation by first using the tip of one finger or the side of our thumb. Take it slow – and remember that touch doesn’t just involve fingers and hands. The inside of the mouth has more nerve endings than many parts of our bodies, so it may be the last place that the hesitant eater wants to experience a new texture, temperature or other type of sensation. Start with where he can interact and build from there.
  5. Sound: The preschool classroom is abuzz with activity and thus, noise. Beginning each snack or mealtime with a song or a ritual, such as gently ringing some wind chimes to signal “it’s time to be together with our food” is a routine that centers both teachers and children. Whatever the ritual, involve the most hesitant eaters in the process and encourage their parents to follow the same routine at home if possible. Kids do best with when routines are consistent across environments.
  6. Proprioceptive Input: The sense of proprioception has a lot to do with adventurous eating. One fun routine that provides the proprioceptive input to help us focus is marching! In one preschool classroom, we implemented a daily routine where the kids picked a food and marched around the table with it as a way to mark the beginning of a meal and provide that much-needed stomping that is calming and organizing for our bodies. Download the song “The Food Goes Marching” here (free till February 1, 2015) as the perfect accompaniment!
  7. Vestibular Sense: While we all know the importance of a balanced diet, you may not be aware that a child’s sense of balance has a lot to do with trying new foods! Our sense of balance and movement, originating in the inner ear and known as the vestibular system, is the foundation for allfine motor skills. In order to feel grounded and stable, kids need a solid foundation under the “feet and seat.” Many classroom chairs leave preschoolers with little support and feet dangling. Create a footrest by duct taping old text or phone books together or if you’re extra handy, create a step stool that allows the chair legs to sit inside the stool itself.
    footrest
    An inexpensive version can be made with a box of canned baked beans from COSTCO, like this one. Carefully open the box because you’ll be using it again to create the footrest. Simply remove the cans, empty just two, then rinse thoroughly and discard the lids. Now place the cans back in the box with the two empty cans facing up, so that the legs of the chair will poke through the box and into those two cans. Reinforce with duct tape. Instant footrest!

Melanie Potock, MA, CCC-SLP, treats children birth to teens who have difficulty eating.  She is the co-author of Parenting in the Kitchen: How to Raise Happy and Healthy Eaters in Our Chicken Nugget World (Aug. 2015), the author of Happy Mealtimes with Happy Kids and the producer of the award-winning kids’ CD Dancing in the Kitchen: Songs that Celebrate the Joy of Food!  Melanie’s two-day course on pediatric feeding is  offered for ASHA CEUs.  She can be reached at Melanie@mymunchbug.com.  

Are You Wearing Your Play-Based Hat Today?

Importance of play

Ever leave the house and not know what to wear? As an early intervention SLP, I wear many hats, and there are days when I’m not sure which hat (or hats) I’ll put on. As any therapist knows, the nature of our job is not just treatment related, but often much more. Of course the hat I wear most often is my speech therapy hat but when I enter the homes of my “kids” every week I sometimes encounter life that requires me to be more than just an SLP.

There is a trust that forms when you regularly enter someone’s home. Families respect you not only as their child’s SLP, but also as a resource for other parenting questions. These questions might require my community resource hat, my fellow parent hat or my support hat. Because the parents of our clients trust us to meet many needs, it is important that when they ask questions or seek guidance we are there to help.

For example, many families today experience a societal pressure to push their child well beyond what is developmentally appropriate. Parents set unrealistic expectations for their children and panic if they feel their child isn’t “keeping up.” I’m concerned when I enter homes filled with obscene piles of toys, a television constantly going and a toddler who manipulates my phone and tablet more skillfully than I do! Through my sessions I model play, in the absence of fancy toys and electronic devices, hoping the parents will realize how simply PLAYING with their child is enough. There’s no better way to achieve developmental milestones and enrich children than through play.

Sometimes my example isn’t enough…well OK, it’s often not enough. So frequently I have a conversation about age-appropriate expectations, age-appropriate toys and what children need most from their parents.

When pondering how to start this conversation, I often find myself asking: What can I do to educate families on the importance of play? What can I say to drive home age-appropriate expectations? What are some of the most important points to stress to the families I serve? Professionally, I branched into owning a business devoted to play, plus I learned about how play is changing and why it matters.

Here are some tips you may find helpful to educate parents about the importance of simple play:

• Remind families that children need unstructured playtime and give specific examples of what is learned when a child does “nothing.” A toddler’s day should consist mostly of unstructured play and opportunities to experience their world with all their senses. Tell parents that this is the best way for their child to learn.

• Share with parents the American Academy of Pediatrics’ recommendation of no screen time before age 2 and only two hours per day for children older than 2. Parents are usually shocked to hear this, but even a television in the background distracts a baby/toddler and can make it more difficult for them to focus and learn.

• Inform parents that babies and toddlers do not truly learn anything from flashcards. The powerful marketing beast can sell just about anything to an anxious parent who wants that best for her child. However, research and experience do not support their use, particularly at such an early age. Share what you know about play-based options for teaching language skills.

• Encourage parents to slow down and follow their instincts. Oftentimes parents know what’s best for their child, but are influenced by outside sources. As professionals, we can reassure parents to trust themselves.

If you are an EI SLP I hope you realize your importance not only in the life of the child you serve, but his family as well. You are appreciated and trusted, so may you guide your families so that they are able to enjoy the miracle of their child to the fullest. Choose your hats wisely and don’t keep all that knowledge about PLAY under your hat. We all have a role in supporting families and enriching children’s lives.

Lacy Morise, MS, CCC-SLP of Berryville, Virginia works for the West Virginia Birth to Three Program as an early intervention therapist. She also owns Milestones & Miracles (with her EI PT bestie, Nicole Sergent, MPT) Read her blog and like her on Facebook, follow her on Twitter @milestonesm and Pinterest

Kid Confidential: Parent Education and Training, Part 3

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I began this series noting the positive effects of parent education and training and sharing tips for how to provide it.  Then, in part 2, I discussed how I implement parent education/training in my therapy sessions.  Here, in part 3, I discuss how I use digital recording to support parent training and education.

Although I own a tablet for therapy, my most valued device on that tablet is the video camera. Most of the time you will not find me with some speech or language app open on my tablet. Rather, you’ll see me with toys all over the floor and my tablet set up with the camera ready to record.

When working closely with parents during therapy, I find that digital recordings provide helpful feedback on a parent’s use of therapy techniques.  It works especially well during real-time education and training (you can read about this in part 2 of this series), as so much of language development depends on the ways caregivers communicate with young children.

The following are some personal rules I like to follow when using digital recordings in therapy:

  1.  Be careful of confidentiality when recording:  This seems so basic but I always get parents’ permission prior to recording their child.  Also I am very cautious when sharing digital recordings of clients as I always worry about secure emails, websites and such.  I tend to use thumb drives, when I can, to share the digital recordings with parents in person just to ensure security. If I cannot provide the parents with a thumb drive on the spot week to week (the one big problem I have found using my tablet camera) I will be sure to still review the digital recording on the spot during the session for educational purposes.
  2. Record only portions of the session:  I understand parents do not have a lot of time to review recordings, so I try to only record simple models of techniques by myself, followed by parents’ trials with my positive feedback and suggestions for modifications or changes. This way, if parents question how to implement the techniques, they have a quick refresher ready for them. My rule of thumb is to try and keep these recordings to five minutes or so. This way parents can quickly access the information they need.
  3. A few things I like to record when I can:
    1. Initially, I always try to record basic parent interactions and hopefully PLAY with their child (this is not about telling the parent how “wrong” they are in the way they interact with their child, but rather it’s about increasing parental awareness of the types of interactions they tend to have with their child.  For example, are they always asking their child questions? Are they talking “at” rather than “to” their child?  This video review is non-judgmental but educational in nature.
    2. Sibling interactions can also be very helpful as well if the sibling is older and can understand and learn to use various techniques to help the younger child.
    3. Sometimes taping sibling interactions is a great way to teach parents how to play with their language delayed child.
    4. I try to record “before” and “after” the use of strategies. Parents love to see how they themselves have changed over time and I love to show them!
  4. Record great parent and sibling interactions:  The last things I like to try to record are moments of wonderful interactions between the child and his parent and/or siblings. I love sharing those moments and reviewing all the great techniques used by the family members. This is not only a great review, but continues to encourage and empower parents to keep up the good work. I also like to keep previous recordings so that parents can see their personal progress over time.  It is amazing to watch their faces when they see how far they have come!

In my experience, digital recordings can really enhance parent education and training, can be a great reminder and resource for parents, and can encourage and empower parents to continue to use good therapy strategies and techniques at home to continue fostering language development in their child.

Maria Del Duca, MS, CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in southern Arizona.  She owns a private practice, Communication Station: Speech Therapy, PLLC, and has a speech and language blog under the same name.  She has been practicing as an ASHA certified member since 2003 and is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 16, School-Based Issues.  She has experience in various settings such as private practice, hospital and school environments and has practiced in New Jersey, Maryland, Kansas and now Arizona.  Maria has a passion for early childhood, autism spectrum disorder, rare syndromes, and childhood apraxia of speech.  For more information, visit her blog or find her on Facebook.

SLPs in the Home: What’s Pot Got to Do with It?

brownie

I never thought I’d be writing an article for ASHA about marijuana, but because I live in Colorado, I’ve got the latest news on weed to pass along to my fellow SLPs. In fact, if you were sitting here with me in the privacy of my own home (and you were over 21), we could chat about it while lawfully smoking a joint, munching on an edible cannabis-laced cookie, sucking on a marijuana lollipop or even, inhaling the vapors from an e-cigarette packed with marijuana oil. That’s just a sampling of the options we have to get high in the “mile high city.” Before you shout “I’m coming over!” I should probably disclose that I’m not a marijuana user, medical or recreational. If your next thought is “But I DON’T live in Colorado (or Washington) so this doesn’t apply to me – at least professionally” please read this entire article. Colorado law is considered a “springboard for other states” to legalize marijuana soon. Plus, illegal shipping to other states, often discovered during a routine traffic violation committed by the average Joe next door, has increased significantly. According to the El Paso Intelligence Center & National Seizure System, the mini-vans and SUVs bringing home “souvenirs” from Colorado aren’t just from the states bordering the Rocky Mountains. New York, Florida, Illinois and Wisconsin were some of the most popular destinations and consequently, you may experience some unexpected safety issues if you are providing home-based care for children and adults.

In an effort to educate therapists on the new laws and our responsibility to inform our families of issues that may arise with recreational marijuana use, Jane Woodard, the executive director of Colorado Drug Endangered Children, is traveling the state providing health care professionals the necessary information to keep ourselves and the families we serve safe. SLPs are required by law to report suspected conditions that would result in neglect/safety issues or abuse of children and adults. However, many of our families are simply not aware of the safety concerns and home based therapists are often the first resource for educating those families who choose to partake in using, growing or processing recreational marijuana.

Given the various populations that we serve, here is an overview of some of the safety issues:

Infants: As a pediatric feeding therapist, just one of the populations in my care are babies who require support for breast and bottle feeding. In this Colorado culture of embracing our new freedom, mothers are commenting to me without restraint that they’re using marijuana to combat nausea during pregnancy or enjoy “a little pot now and then” while breastfeeding.Studies indicate that by age four alarming changes occur in children that have had prenatal exposure. It’s noteworthy that the studies focused on a much lower amounts of delta-9-tetrhydrocannibinol (THC: the chemical that produces the psychoactive effect) than what is present in today’s super-charged marijuana products. The children demonstrated “increased behavioral problems and decreased performance on visual perceptual tasks, language comprehension, sustained attention and memory.” Marijuana use while breastfeeding is contraindicated because the THC is excreted into breast milk and stored in fat and is suspected to impact a baby’s motor development. There are no established “pump and dump” guidelines for THC and it stays in the bloodstream for much longer than other drugs. Consider the increased risks from both second-hand smoke and third-hand smoke or the “contamination that lingers” after smoking, including an increased risk for SIDS and more. For the home-based SLP, exposure to second and third-hand smoke or residue means that I will likely carry that aroma with me to the next home. I am responsible for the safety of all of the children I treat, and many are medically fragile and/or have sensory challenges and would be impacted by these odors. Today, I am faced with difficult conversations with parents that I never imagined I would have.

Children: In four short months, from January to April 2014, Colorado’s Poison Control Center has reported 11 children who ingested edibles, one as young as five months old. Over half of those children had to be hospitalized and two were admitted to the ICU. Consider that those are the reported cases – and what goes unreported is difficult to ascertain. While the law requires that the packaging cannot be designed to appeal to kids, current practices are questionable. Some argue that edibles are packaged too much like junk food, with boxes of “Pot-tarts” similar to the popular toaster pastry, bottles of fizzy “soda-pot” and candy bars with labels that rival Mars® and Hershey’s®.  In April 2014, Karma-Candy was the marijuana candy that a father in Denver consumed just before hallucinating and killing his wife, who was on the phone with 911 dispatchers at the time. She could be heard yelling to her kids to go downstairs as she desperately tried to get help for her family.

Packaging of certain products must also be in an opaque and re-sealable container, but that law only applies to the time of purchase. Plus, most edibles contain multiple servings and it’s not unusual for one cookie to serve six people. Even adults are mistakenly eating whole cookies and in April 2014, one visiting college student consequently jumped to his death from a hotel balcony after eating too much of an edible. A New York Times columnist visiting Colorado ate a whole candy bar labeled as 16 servings, and “laid in a hallucinatory state for 8 hours.” Home baked marijuana options are equally confusing. As a feeding therapist, I used to be comfortable offering foods to a child from a family’s pantry. But now, a tempting plate of brownies may be more than just a plate of brownies. By law, edibles, like any marijuana product (even plants), must be in an “enclosed, locked space.” However, it is not unusual for Colorado therapists to arrive for their home visit and find a bong, topical lotions or a half-eaten edible on the living room coffee table. Early intervention and home health care agencies are considering how to educate families on the first day of contact, during the intake process. Susan Elling, MA, CCC-SLP, who treats both children and adults in the home, notes that “It will be very important to have an open and honest conversation with a patient (and their family) regarding marijuana use as part of taking the medical history – just as we do for alcohol and smoking.”

Adults: Ms. Elling reported that “the population in need of homecare services may be more likely to use marijuana to control pain and nausea” because family members are more likely to suggest it and there will no longer be a need to obtain a medical marijuana card. Ms. Elling also notes that marijuana “affects sleep, balance, coordination, and cognition.  This may be amplifying the conditions a patient is already dealing with related to medical issues.  It can also significantly raise anxiety.  These are all factors that increase fall risk, confusion, lead to poor judgment, and can setback a patient’s recovery. It may be very difficult to determine what issues are related to the patient’s medical condition and which are related to the marijuana use.  Interventions, progress and prognosis may be affected.” Edibles in particular are a safety hazard for this population, because of the inability to self-regulate. There is no predicting how an edible will effect one person or another.

“It’s not your grandmother’s marijuana,” reported Dr. Richard Zane, who is the head of the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado Hospital. Well-meaning family members, hoping to control their loved one’s discomfort, may not realize that the strength of today’s marijuana is significantly higher than the pot your cool grandma smoked in the 60’s. In fact, THC levels represent a 121% increase just from 1999 to 2010. Family members may not understand that the strength and effect of the drug varies from product to product. For example, compare two hits on today’s joint and an individual will ingest approximately five mg of the chemicals that produce the psychoactive and/or sedative effects compared to up to 100 mg in one packaged edible. Plus, even using the exact same method of ingestion does not guarantee the exact same dosage every time. Zane reported in this interview with Colorado Public Radio that the “drug isn’t always spread evenly through food or candy, so several people eating the same amounts can be ingesting different quantities of marijuana.”

The uncertainty of dosage and effects has Elling on guard: “I am concerned that the high potency, unpredictable effect, easy availability, and unclear dosage information of edibles may have serious consequences for homecare patients with already fragile health. It is also misleadingly considered quite “benign” and safe compared to alcohol consumption and smoking.  I feel the need to know the signs and symptoms of a marijuana overdose and know the contraindications with any other prescription or OTC drugs they may be taking and be able to educate my patients and their caregivers regarding this issue.”

Additional Safety Concerns: In the course of this short article, it’s impossible to cover all of the safety issues, including those related to growing and processing marijuana in the home. These concerns include electrical hazards from impromptu wiring (not to code); cultivation hazards such a mold and poor air quality for medically fragile patients;  increased carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide necessary for growing; chemical exposures and improper storage of pesticides and poisonous fertilizers; THC on household surfaces and airborne exposure; and exploding hash oil labs. From January to April 2014, hash oil explosions occurred on a weekly basis in Colorado, some triggered just by turning on a nearby light switch.

Consider Family Functioning: The impact on safety is the tip of the iceberg. Woodard explained that home health professionals must consider a parent’s behavior when using marijuana, the impact on a child’s behavior and family functioning overall. Difficult but often necessary questions to ask include: What steps have you taken to protect your children and family members? How do you store your marijuana and paraphernalia? What are you like when you use? Most importantly, she recommended asking yourself “Do I believe that the conditions in this home could reasonably result in harm” to anyone in this household? If so, educate the family and be mindful of mandatory reporting laws.

 

Melanie Potock, MA, CCC-SLP, treats children birth to teens who have difficulty eating.  She is the author of Happy Mealtimes with Happy Kids and the producer of the award-winning kids’ CD Dancing in the Kitchen: Songs that Celebrate the Joy of Food!  Melanie’s two-day course on pediatric feeding is offered for ASHA CEUs and includes both her book and CD for each attendee.  She can be reached at Melanie@mymunchbug.com.

Kid Confidential: The Latest on Treatment of Ear Infections

ear infection

For those of us speech-language pathologists who serve the birth-5 year old population (or have young children of our own), it is always important for us to know the most recent health and safety regulations that can affect our clients/students. Here are the newest regulations regarding the medical treatment of ear infections.

As otitis media affects three out of four children by the age of three, and there is a correlation between chornic otits media and communication delay, it is likely that we as SLPs will treat students with acute or chronic otitis media.  As a result we must understand the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines regarding the medical treatment of this condition.

Although, these regulations were initially released in 2004, it appears there is still much confusion among the medical community and, as a result, a second publication of the same AAP medical regulations for treating otitis media was released in 2013.

The regulations were written in response to antibiotic overuse and resistance in children.  Traditionally children are treated with antibiotics as the first line of defense for acute otitis media.  As there are a number of causes for ear pain, it is crucial that pediatricians firstly make an accurate diagnosis of otitis media prior to administration of antibiotics.  Doctors are urged to diagnose otitis media only when a moderate to severe bulging of the tympanic membrane (i.e. ear drum) is present.  Mild bulging and recent ear pain (i.e. meaning within 48 hours) exhibited along with other signs of ear infection (e.g. fever) also may be diagnosed appropriately.  Therefore, if the pediatrician is unsure of the diagnosis of otitis media he/she is discouraged t to prescribe antiobiotics.

Although pain is present, antibiotics are not necessarily to be considered the first course of action. In fact, in response to ear pain and/or low grade fevers, pain relievers are to be recommended initially as “about 70 percent of kids get better on their own within two or three days, and giving antibiotics when they aren’t necessary can lead to the development of superbugs over time” reports Dr. Richard M. Rosenfield, professor and chairman of otolaryngology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn.

Antibiotics are only to be prescribed when the child is exhibiting several signs or symptoms of otitis media (e.g. pain, swelling for at least 48 hours, fever above 102.2 degrees Fahrenheit, etc.).  Immediate prescription of antibiotics should be recommended in the event a child’s tympanic membrane ruptures.

Although it is important to understand the medical treatment of otitis media, perhaps it is more important for us to understand the simple preventive measures a parent can take to help avoid the development of ear infections in the first place.  In addition to this medical treatment plan, the guidelines also stress avoidance of tobacco exposure, receiving the influenza vaccination, and breast feeding exclusively for the first 6 months (if possible) as additional ways to prevent infant ear infections.

Medial guidelines for “silent ear infections” (i.e. middle ear fluid without presence of other symptoms typically following acute otitis media or colds) consist of “watchful waiting.”  If a child is diagnosed with “silent ear infections” also known as otitis media with effusion the pediatrician should initially provide no medical treatment.  A follow up reexamination should take place three to six months later.  If fluid persists for more than three months, the pediatrician should recommend a speech/language and hearing assessment.  If middle ear fluid persists more than four months and signs of hearing loss are evident, a pediatrician may recommend placement of PE tubes or refer their patient to an ENT for further assessment.

I very much appreciate the AAP for adding in the guideline of further assessment in the areas of speech/language and hearing if fluid persists longer than three months.  This demonstrates the AAP’s understanding of the important of communication development and the need for a quick resolution to such delays rather than the typical “wait and see” attitude that parents often report to encounter particularly in instances of “late talkers.”  Now we, as SLPs, have guidance and support from the AAP for our clients/students with long-term persistent middle ear fluid.

Please refer to the resources below for further information.

Resources:

Jaslow, R. (2013, February 25). Antibiotics for ear infections: Pediatrician release new guidelinesCBS News.

New guidelines for treating ear infections. (2004). The Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide.

 

Maria Del Duca, M.S. CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in southern, Arizona.  She owns a private practice, Communication Station: Speech Therapy, PLLC, and has a speech and language blog under the same name.  Maria received her master’s degree from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.  She has been practicing as an ASHA certified member since 2003 and is an affiliate of Special Interest Group 16, School-Based Issues.  She has experience in various settings such as private practice, hospital and school environments and has practiced speech pathology in NJ, MD, KS and now AZ.  Maria has a passion for early childhood, autism spectrum disorders, rare syndromes, and childhood Apraxia of speech.  For more information, visit her blog or find her on Facebook.

Thirty Million Words

Jan 30

Spreading the Words: the Thirty Million Words® Initiative

It’s no secret to speech/language and hearing professionals that children’s early language environments are critical to their speech, language, and academic outcomes.  Yet millions of children fail to receive the input they need to be ready for school when they start, and they fall only farther behind as school continues.

But it doesn’t have to be that way.  Parents, caregivers, speech/language and hearing professionals, teachers, and community members can join in what we at Thirty Million Words® call ‘Spreading the Words.’  By ‘Spreading the Words’ about the power of parents talking to their children to grow their children’s brains, we can ensure every child is ready to learn when they start school.

The Thirty Million Words® Initiative is an evidence-based parent-directed program designed to encourage parents to harness the power of their words to enrich their young children’s language environments, build their brains, and shape their futures.  The Thirty Million Words® and Project ASPIRE (created specifically for children with hearing loss) curricula utilize animation and real parent-child video to teach parents about early brain and language development, along with strategies to encourage and support development.

Watch how your words build your child’s brain

The curricula are supported with LENA® technology, which works as a ‘word pedometer’ to count how much parents are talking with their children and getting their children talking with them.  This feedback from the LENA® helps parents track their progress as they advance through the Project ASPIRE and Thirty Million Words® programs.

The Thirty Million Words® and Project ASPIRE curricula offer parents strategies to enrich their interactions with their children without adding more to their already busy and often overstretched lives.  When parents are equipped with three key tools – the 3Ts – a world of rich language engagement is unlocked.

Tune In: Pay attention to what your child is focused on or communicating to you and change your words to match.  The signals your child gives will change rapidly since her attention span is short while she’s young – staying Tuned In is a dynamic activity!

Talk More: Think of your child’s brain like a piggy bank – every word you say is another penny you invest.  There’s no limit to how many words you can invest to fill your child’s bank and build his brain!  Be as descriptive as possible to build your child’s vocabulary.

Take Turns: Your child is never too young to have a conversation with you!  Respond to your child’s signals to keep the turns going.

Parent talk is the most powerful tool for building children’s brains and sending them to school ready to learn.  With a community of professionals, caregivers, and parents ‘Spreading the Words’ about the power of parent talk, every child can get on track for school.

Hear from Shurand, a Thirty Million Words® graduate.

Learn more about the Thirty Million Words® Initiative at tmw.org.

 

Kristin R. Leffel, BS, is the Director of Policy and Community Partnerships for the Thirty Million Words® Initiative at the University of Chicago.  Her primary focus is curriculum development of Thirty Million Words® and Project ASPIRE, program design and implementation, and evaluation.  Her academic interests focus on health disparities, particularly the social determinants of health and the health of socially disenfranchised populations. 

 

Dana L. Suskind, MD, is a Professor of Surgery and Pediatrics at the University of Chicago Medicine, Director of the Pediatric Cochlear Implantation Program, and Founder and Director of the Thirty Million Words® Initiative. Her research is dedicated to addressing health disparities, specifically early language disparities, through the development of novel intervention programs. She has conceptualized and initiated development and evaluation of two parent-direct, home-visiting interventions: Project ASPIRE and the Thirty Million Words®. These interventions, for parents of children with hearing loss and parents of typically developing children respectively, aim to improve child outcomes through parents’ enrichment of the early language environment.

 

 

 

NIMTR: Not In My Treatment Room!

poison

You’ve heard of NIMBY, “not-in-my-backyard” haven’t you?  Well there’s a new acronym, NIMTR or “not-in-my-therapy-treatment-room!”  Speech-language pathologists are inundated by catalogs filled with wonderful colorful, fragrant, pliable toys as treatment materials.  We use these every day with our students, our clients in clinics, our bedside patients.  But how much do we really know about the safety and makeup of those therapy materials your shrinking budget dollars are purchasing every year?

Some interesting facts about toys.

Toys are BIG business. Just visit any mall in America or website such as Amazon.com.  Worldwide, over 80 billion dollars were spent on toys in 2009, with more than a quarter of that money consumed in the United States. The latest figures by the Toy Industry Association Inc., places the annual U.S. domestic toy market at $22 billion in 2012.  Of this, $6.63 billion covers toys and articles for infants and toddlers, puzzles and games, and arts and crafts.  I mention these specific categories because they are materials most likely to be used by SLPs working with young children in early intervention, preschool, or school settings.

So many toys … but are they safe?

The United States imports many more toys from foreign countries compared to its exports. China, Japan, Mexico, Canada and Denmark lead the way in toy imports.  Since other countries do not implement the same environmental protections in manufacturing as we do in the states, the question of safety looms large.  The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) is the main body responsible for overseeing the safety and recall of unsafe toys and products manufactured in or imported into the United States.  In 2012, the CPSC released a new risk assessment tool to help improve the screening of imported products. About 5 percent of the total number of these screenings identified children’s products.  One example: a shipment of 28,000 baby bottles imported by Dollar Tree was seized after determining they were defective and unsafe using the new risk assessment tool. You can read more about the successes of CPSC online.

The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 made it mandatory for all toys aimed at children under the age of 14 to meet new federal safety standards.  Some of these include testing lead content and concentration of phthalates (DEHP, DBP and BBP* in particular). Here is a video to see how CPSC works collaboratively with other government agencies to seize toy imports that are unsafe for children.

Even though we have protections, toys of questionable safety continue to enter the consumer market.  Recently DNAinfo in New York released this alarming report, which shows many toys in stores tested positive for elevated levels of toxic substances, including phthalates, which have been found to be associated with asthma, birth defects and hormone disruption, among other health problems. One item on the list, a Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles pencil case manufactured by Innovative Design was found to contain 150 times the legal phthalate limit for toys. But alas, currently, it does not qualify as a toy under federal regulations.

What if it is not a toy?

And that’s a good point: Sometimes SLPs use materials in their practice that are not toys. Like the pencil case mentioned above or what about commonly used rubber tubing that a speech-language pathologist may use during treatment for oral exercises?  Would such rubber tubing be considered a toy, a medical device, or something else?  Who oversees the safety of products such as these?

Two organizations responsible for developing standards of safety are the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in Switzerland and the American Society for Testing and Materials International  based in Pennsylvania.  Both provide standards to industries that produce just about everything, from iron bolts to bathmats.  Each provides standards for purchase to companies, who in turn use the standards to manufacture and distribute their product to specification.  I contacted both these organizations to find what standards exist for the rubber tubing example.  As of this writing, no responses to my request have been received.

What is an SLP to do?

So what can you do to ensure that the materials you use with your students and clients are safe?  Here are a few suggestions:

  1. If you are purchasing from a distributor online, check their website for more information. For example, SuperDuper Publications places a Product Safety statement on their website and invites customers to email them for more information.  Companies who openly provide statements such as these make it easier for the consumer to trust the safety of their purchases.  If you cannot find information on product safety or product testing, email the company and ask for it.
  2. Check the CPSC’s website for toy and product recalls. You can find the latest recalls, search for recalls by product name or by country of manufacture, and also report an unsafe product.
  3. Read the manual! Electronics such as iPads and tablets come with a manual that will often provide the ISO or ASTM Int’l standard used to insure safety and will list potential hazards.
  4. Contact the manufacturer of the product and ask for the MSDS – materials safety data sheet.  This would be a good choice if the product you have or consider purchasing lacks a manual or an information sheet on standards testing.  You also can look up a product by name and manufacturer on the MSDS website. On this site a search for “rubber tube” gave me 34 hits.  While searches can be daunting and time consuming, the insurance of safety provides peace of mind to you and the clients on your caseload.
  5. Avoid buying inexpensive toys or materials from questionable sources such as street vendors.

Informed SLPs can now approach their materials purchases with a new savvy.  Next time you are tempted to buy inexpensive therapy materials composed of questionable ingredients, just say “NIMTR”!!!!

 

Anastasia Antoniadis is with the Tuscarora (PA) Intermediate Unit and works as a state consultant for Early Intervention Technical Assistance through the Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Network. She earned a Master of Arts degree in speech pathology from City College of the City University of New York and a Master’s degree in public health from Temple University. She was a practicing pediatric SLP for 14 years before becoming an early childhood consultant for Pennsylvania’s early intervention system. Her public health studies have been in the area of environmental health and data mapping using geographic information system technology.  You can follow her on Twitter @SLPS4HlthySchools.

Coaching Parents to Foster Their Child’s Expressive Language Skills

asianmomapple

I recently had the opportunity to provide tele-speech-language services to a toddler with autism spectrum disorder. I knew it would be difficult to have him sit in front of a computer for long periods, so I decided that I would employ a “parent coaching” approach, empowering his parents to more effectively help their son.

I started by having the parents videotape their daily interactions with him, which revealed that they were aware of their son’s difficulties and in-tune with his communication needs. However, even though this little boy appeared quite bright, it was difficult to distinguish when he was answering a question from what he had learned, or if it was a rote response. The parents had specific goals they wanted their son to achieve, so how was I going to help them?

I provided the boy’s parents with information about expressive language development and explained that their expectations appeared to be beyond this child’s current capabilities (determined by the boy’s age, as well as his disability). Next I took the language and vocabulary skills the parents wanted their son to learn—such as labeling an apple—and broke them out into smaller steps. These are the types of activities I suggest parents use to help a child grasp a language concept:

  • Present the child with several apples, preferably of different colors.
  • Talk about the outside of the apples: color, shape, size, smell, taste and texture.
  • Cut open the apples (“What do you see?”) , and eat some of each, talking about how it sounds and tastes as you bite into each piece.
  • Cut an apple in half horizontally and use washable tempera paints to make apple prints on paper using the different colors apples can be.
  • Find a simple recipe to make applesauce or another food from apples.
  • Eat apple slices with peanut butter and talk about how it tastes, and about the messiness and stickiness.
  • Make a pretend apple out of PlayDoh.
  • Compare the “fake” apple with the real one, explaining that you can eat a “real” apple but not the “pretend.” This models analytical thinking.
  • Bring in another fruit, such as an orange, and do the same steps.
  • Try making and drinking homemade orange juice.
  • Compare an apple to an orange.
  • Show video clips of people picking apples and oranges, showing how both grow on a tree.
  • Add bananas, doing the first seven steps (tastes great with peanut butter).
  • Roll the items across the floor and talk about how they roll. Compare.
  • Use this method to teach about common fruits you either purchase or see in the market.

Of course, just relating these steps to parents isn’t enough, because they have a tendency to take over for their child if they see the child struggling. For example, it’s tempting for them to place the child’s hands on the paper to make the apple prints, which removes the child from the process and leads to a loss of interest. To help parents avoid this, I explain that learning involves making mistakes. Other suggestions I provide include:

  • When speaking to your child, keep your sentences simple and to the point (approximately three to four words per utterance: “Are you hungry?” versus “Are you ready to go have some sandwiches for lunch?” Expanding utterances will come along a bit later!
  • Speak slowly because it may take the child additional time to process the information.
  • Do not require the child to look you in the eye when you are speaking to him. A glance at your face, especially at this age, should suffice. Toddlers are busy-bodies and need to keep moving and exploring.
  • If you ask a child a comprehension question, he or she may provide a quick or rote answer to be able to do what he wants to do.
  • Allow time to just play with your child. Let the child direct the play. Have a few toys out to choose from and follow his or her lead.
  • Make simple remarks about what is going on, but avoid asking questions to probe for an answer: “What color is your truck? How about that car? What is this part of the car called?” This is play time, not teaching time.
  • Model out loud how to think about items: “You have a big, blue truck! Wow! Mine is small. I have a small, yellow truck. “
  • Model out loud how to problem-solve (over-and-over-and-over again): “Oops! The wheel came off my truck. Hmmm. How can I fix it? {looking over the whole truck while thinking….} If I get something to help the wheel stay on, I should be able to fix it. If I use glue, the wheel may not spin.”
  • Allow some “quiet” play time as well and let your child do the talking (or not if he so chooses). This is a great opportunity to just sit and listen to what your child is saying (to you and/or the toys).

I have parents send me some YouTube video of them performing some of these activities with their child. In subsequent sessions, we discuss what works well (and not so well) with the child, and I share more activity ideas and literature with them.

Tracy Sippl, MS, CCC-SLP, is a Seymour, Wisc.-based speech-language pathologist and tele-therapist with Cumberland Therapy Services. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 18, Telepractice. This post was adapted from a post on the Cumberland Therapy blog,  Right Therapy–Right Results–Right Now.