Five Tips to Help Students Review Skills Over Summer Break

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According to the website of the National Summer Learning Association, “all young people experience learning losses when they do not engage in educational activities during the summer.” I want to help support my middle-schoolers’ language skills during this time. This year, I put together a handout with suggestions on what families can do over the break:

1. Visit a Museum

  • While at the museum, go on a scavenger hunt. There are plenty of pre-made hunts online. Some scavenger hunts ask simple “wh” questions and others may require critical thinking. The best part is that the students are learning without even realizing it!
  • Ask students to come home with three facts they learned. They can take pictures (if allowed) as a reminder and/or jot down details.
  • On the way to museum, review common museum terms such as exhibit, ancient, extinct, era, discovery and more.

2. Write a journal

For students who need to work on writing skills, suggest journaling. Ask them to create a summer writing journal and decorate it. Students can write what they do day-to-day, or print a list of pre-made writing prompts. I found a sample list of writing prompts online.

3. Play language games

SLPs often collect and hoard board games that we use to reinforce target goals. Why not share some of these with parents? Common games played in my room appropriate for middle school include:

  • Apples to Apples
  • You’ve Been Sentenced
  • Trigger
  • Baffle Gab

4. Read, read, read.

I know this seems obvious, but it’s so important for kids to continue reading over the summer. In my school, we charge kids with reading every day for at least an hour. Send home a list of books that kids in your caseload may enjoy reading. Also, encourage parents to ask their kids questions about characters, problems, solutions, settings and other story details.

5. Cook

Why not try a new hobby while home for the summer? Older students can make many yummy dishes and cooking offers another fun way for parents to engage with their kids. You can find plenty of no-bake recipes online for kids who stay home alone during the day. Reading a recipe teaches following directions, comprehension and vocabulary. It’s also a pretty important life skill (in my opinion).

These are just some ideas to help your kids get going and keep busy this summer! What summer activities do you suggest for your older kids?

Gabriella Schecter, MS, CCC-SLP, is a full-time SLP working in a grade 6-12 school. She posts regularly on Instagram (@middleschoolSLP), sharing ideas and activities for this age group. Check out her blog or contact her at MiddleschoolSLP@gmail.com.

Apraxia Awareness Day: 10 Tips on Giving Kids With CAS a Voice

May 14 marks the third annual Apraxia Awareness Day, a movement headed by the Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America (CASANA). The association’s motto—”Every Child Deserves a Voice”—entreats industry pros to correctly identify and treat kids with apraxia who may not develop intelligible speech. This is why apraxia awareness day is so important.

When I wrote the 10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Childhood Apraxia of Speech, many SLPs voiced their concern about how CAS is supposed to be a rare disorder and they are seeing over-diagnosis. Their concerns are valid. Current data, according to the ASHA portal, state that CAS occurs in every one to two children per 1,000. Over-diagnosis is a problem precipitated by factors that include:

  • Lack of clear and consistent diagnostic guidelines.
  • Lack of adequately validated diagnostic tools.
  • Professionals other than SLPs (pediatricians, neurologists) diagnosing CAS.
  • SLPs inadequately trained in diagnosis and treatment.

Over-diagnosis can cause families undue emotional stress and financial hardship. It also might divert important resources from those children who most need them.

According to research, children with CAS also often go undiagnosed if they truly DO have it! Differential diagnosis is critical with this disorder. Children not identified with CAS may struggle their entire lives and quite possibly not achieve intelligible speech without early and appropriate intervention. Consider that last line again: Without proper diagnosis and treatment, children with CAS may NOT achieve intelligible speech. This is what’s at stake!

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Apraxia awareness is crucial for professionals and families, so every child who has CAS gets the services he or she needs and deserves, regardless of how “rare” the disorder.

These children and parents rely on SLPs to be their heroes. So please, take time today—or soon—to learn more about childhood apraxia of speech. And if you suspect CAS in a client or student:

  • Seek out resources.
  • Attend a conference.
  • Listen in to a webinar.
  • Talk to and consult with your colleagues.
  • Wear blue and speak up for those who don’t yet have a voice.
  • Above all, be part of the solution.

These children and families are counting on you.

Having trouble getting reimbursed for CAS treatment? Read advice on making successful appeals.

And more resources to learn more about childhood apraxia of speech:

 

Laura Smith, MA, CCC-SLP, is a school-based and private clinician in the Denver metro area specializing in childhood apraxia of speech. She’s CASANA-certified for advanced training and clinical expertise in Childhood Apraxia of Speech and often speaks at conferences and consults for school districts or other professionals. Like her on Facebook, follow her on Pinterest, or visit her website at SLPMommyofApraxia.comlauraslpmommy@gmail.com

10 Early Signs and Symptoms of Childhood Apraxia of Speech

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I was a practicing speech-language pathologist for five years before my daughter was born. I worked primarily at the elementary and middle-school levels. I took professional development workshops on childhood apraxia of speech (CAS) and treated it successfully in three kiddos from my caseload. Perhaps that’s why I was bewildered, angry and utterly devastated when I missed those very signs in my own child.

I hadn’t yet worked in early intervention, so I missed what seem like obvious signs to me now that I specialize in the disorder. I urge all SLPs to learn more about CAS, because the disorder requires a specialized approach different from other commonly used treatments for speech and language delays.

In addition, ASHA denotes that the qualified professional to diagnose CAS is an SLP with specialized knowledge in motor learning theory and skills with differential diagnosis in childhood motor speech disorder, not a neurologist or other medical practitioner. It’s important to know the signs, but also to refer your client to a qualified SLP for differential diagnosis if you suspect childhood apraxia of speech.

Here are 10 early signs and symptoms of childhood apraxia of speech:

  • Limited babbling, or variation within babbling
  • Limited phonetic diversity
  • Inconsistent errors
  • Increased errors or difficulty with longer or more complex syllable and word shapes
  • Omissions, particularly in word initial syllable shapes
  • Vowel errors/distortions
  • Excessive, equal stress
  • Loss of previously produced words
  • More difficulty with volitional versus automatic speech responses
  • Predominant use of simple syllable shapes

Other non-speech “soft signs” that may be present include:

  • Impaired volitional oral movements (oral apraxia)
    • Difficulty with volitional “smiling” “kissing” “puckering”
  • Delays with fine/gross motor skills
  • Feeding difficulties that include choking and/or poor manipulation of food
  • General awkwardness or clumsiness

These are early signs, but many overlap with other phonologic and language delays, so it’s important to keep in mind that differential diagnosis is critical, as over-diagnosis of CAS remains problematic. It’s still a relatively rare disorder; however, there are resources that can help if you suspect it.

You can tap the below resources to learn more about childhood apraxia of speech.

 

Laura Smith, MA, CCC-SLP, is a school-based and private clinician in the Denver metro area specializing in childhood apraxia of speech. She’s CASANA-certified for advanced training and clinical expertise in Childhood Apraxia of Speech and often speaks at conferences and consults for school districts or other professionals. Like her on Facebook, follow her on Pinterest, or visit her website at SLPMommyofApraxia.comlauraslpmommy@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

 

Know Your CAS

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When I was pregnant, I remember dreaming about my new baby. My husband and I wondered aloud if she would be a musician like him, an athlete like me, or have some individual talent all her own. We had absolutely no doubts about what strong communications skills she’d have, however. Her mother was an SLP after all.

During her first year, my daughter lagged in all developmental milestones. I went to at least five different conferences on early intervention, but I couldn’t figure out why my daughter wasn’t a chatterbox. She met her first word criteria at one saying “hi” to everyone she met.

My husband’s mother reported he was late to talk and didn’t really say much of anything until after two. I had heard of late talkers, but because I worked at the elementary level, I never treated preschool kids. I brushed aside my pediatrician’s suggestion to seek treatment because I was convinced my daughter must be like her Daddy and that I could help her.

I finally took her in for an evaluation when she was close to three and received a diagnosis of childhood apraxia of speech and global motor planning deficits. After starting therapy based on motor learning principles, she made progress immediately.

Upset that I missed this diagnosis in my own child, I went on to endlessly and obsessively research childhood apraxia of speech. I was disappointed to find maybe eight pages on the subject in my graduate school materials. I know CAS is rare, but SLPs need to know about it and need to have the tools to diagnose and treat it correctly.

That summer I attended the national conference for CAS. The next summer I applied and was accepted into the Apraxia Intensive Training Institute sponsored by CASANA, the largest nonprofit dedicated exclusively to CAS. I was trained under three leading experts: Dr. Ruth Stoeckel, David Hammer and Kathy Jakielski.

If I could get one message out to pediatric SLPs, it would be for them to research and become familiar with the principles of motor learning and change their treatments accordingly for a client with CAS or suspected CAS. I know many like me get so little training or even information on it in graduate school. I’ve met other SLPs who were told it was so rare they would probably never treat it or even that it didn’t exist.

ASHA recognized CAS as a distinctive disorder in 2007. Taking the time to learn more about how treatment for childhood apraxia of speech differs from other approaches for speech and language disorders is crucial for kids with this motor speech disorder.  The importance of a correct diagnosis leads to a successful treatment plan. To briefly summarize, sessions should focus on movement sequences rather than sound sequences taking into account the child’s phonetic repertoire and encouraging frequent repetition.

For more information visit apraxia-kids.org and become familiar with ASHA’s technical report on the subject.

 

Laura Smith MA, CCC-SLP is a speech/language pathologist in the Denver metro area specializing in childhood apraxia of speech. CASANA-recognized for advanced training and expertise in childhood apraxia of speech, she splits her time between the public schools and private practice. She speaks at conferences and consults for school districts or other professionals. Email her at lauraslpmommy@gmail.com, Like her on Facebook, follow her on Pinterest, or visit her website at SLPMommyofApraxia.com.

 

 

Tales From Apraxia Boot Camp

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In August of this year, I was selected to be a part of The Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America’s 2014 Intensive Training Institute, otherwise known as “Apraxia Boot Camp.” Twenty-four speech-language pathologists, including myself, trained with three mentors–Ruth Stoeckel, Kathy Jakielski, and Dave Hammer–at Duquesne University over four days. In its third year, the goal of the boot camp is to spread a high level of knowledge about Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) assessment and treatment throughout the United States and Canada. This conference accomplished that and so much more.

This experience was different than any other continuing education seminars that I have attended. We did not listen to speakers discuss CAS. Instead, Ruth, Kathy and Dave became our mentors. This was powerful. They moderated discussions on evaluation and treatment approaches. We reviewed research papers and had long debates on the principles of motor learning. We highlighted and critiqued therapy methods for those brave enough to show videos of themselves. We problem solved and brought up more questions than we knew were possible.

In smaller groups, our mentors provided insights and personal perspectives on how they work. In this intimate setting, we felt comfortable asking questions and sharing our experiences. The mentors shared constructive criticism along with thoughtful suggestions. In all, they made me think, reflect and question everything I do. Why do I give that test? Why do I treat that way? What is the research behind it? They encouraged us to become critical thinkers.

As therapists, we often get used to using the same materials and therapy techniques we learned in graduate school or during our early experiences. Those methods are not always effective with every child we treat nor are they all proven effective with evidence based-research. Specifically, children with CAS require different therapy techniques than other children with articulation or phonological delays.

Ruth, Kathy and Dave provided valuable information in a small, engaging setting. Their mentoring and passion for CAS has inspired me and I hope to pass along this valuable information to others through mentoring, improving my competency in treatment and diagnosis of CAS, and, in the end, helping children to communicate.

Based on my experience, I’d recommend asking yourself a few questions when selecting your next continuing education event:

  • What am I passionate about? Is there a child or an area of speech pathology that truly inspires me?
  • How will it improve my skill set?
  • How will it help me better serve my clients?
  • Who is doing the most current, researched-based evaluation or therapy techniques?
  • How will it further our profession?

 

Amanda Zimmerman, MA, CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in Columbus, OH. She can be reached at azimmerman@columbusspeech.org.