My First ASHA Convention: The Perspective of a Graduate Student

blog2

How To Get There

My exposure to the ASHA convention up until this year was limited to the experiences of others: faculty members who discussed their presentations; doctoral students who presented their work at the conference; and tales of bright-eyed graduate students who had attended their first convention. But amidst the busyness of the end of the semester I wasn’t prepared for just how amazing my first ASHA convention experience was going to be.

My journey to the 2014 ASHA Convention started earlier this year, when I saw a post on ASHA’s Facebook page announcing the Student Ethics Essay Contest. Like most other graduate students, I did not have an expendable income to support my conference attendance, so I figured it was worth a shot to enter the contest! I never expected to win and am so honored. It was a rewarding and enriching experience to examine the Code of Ethics in greater detail, and I encourage graduate students to enter the contest in future years.

Why Go as a Graduate Student?

I didn’t really know what to expect of the convention and I wasn’t sure how useful it was going to be for me, but it turned out to be an incredibly valuable experience. As a second year graduate student, I now have the level of knowledge and assuredness of which areas are most interesting to me to allow me the focus necessary to be productive at the convention.

Here are some compelling reasons to attend an ASHA convention as a graduate student:

• Perhaps the most exciting part of the experience was being surrounded by thousands of other people who have the same interests, passions, and who are doing similar work. It was validating and encouraging to be sitting in a room full of students, researchers, and clinicians who have the same questions that I do, and who were there seeking answers, knowledge, and ideas from other clinicians and researchers. There is so much to learn!
• It is a great way to network. For example, while at the convention I had the opportunity to meet a professor from another university whose project I am assisting with from a distance and discuss the next steps of the project.
• Jobs, jobs, jobs! There are so many recruiters in the exhibit hall, from all kinds of settings. It is the best feeling to walk around, peruse the different opportunities and locales, and feel confident that our field is in such a need that we can find work pretty much anywhere!
• It is a great opportunity to gain experience presenting research. Submit a poster and if it is accepted there are always ways to find funding, like through your local NSSLHA Chapter or your graduate program department.

 

What It’s Like

Once at the convention, I quickly had to accept the fact that it was impossible to see every presentation that I wanted to. So instead I strategized and attended talks that are relevant to my clinical placements and other intriguing topics that I won’t get the chance to learn about in my rotations. Things that stood out:

• The days are long and the presentations are many. I was faced with the choice of attending Short Courses (CEU courses), Sessions, Poster Presentations, and Technical Sessions – all of which co-occur! So having a sense of focus was important.
• The beauty of ASHA is that there are so many presenters that you are bound to find many presentations that you’re interested in. My two greatest areas of interest are voice and bilingual (Spanish/English) speech-language pathology, so that’s primarily where I focused my time, but I also stepped out of my comfort zone and attended a talk about using Passy Muir valves in the pediatric population, as well as a really interesting talk about qualitative research using ethnographic interviewing in the Mexican immigrant population in the US. My favorite talks were the ones that ended in great conversation and a common sharing of ideas and knowledge between clinicians and researchers alike.
• I was impressed with the NSSLHA Experience program, which is geared toward current and prospective graduate students in both speech-language pathology and audiology. Experienced clinicians, current clinical fellows, and leaders in our field presented about the ins and outs of preparing for the PRAXIS exam, how to secure a quality Clinical Fellowship experience, and the important differences between a mentor and supervisor.

I wasn’t ready to leave and I am still thinking about the wonderful people I met, all of the opportunity in store for the future of our field, and the next generation of speech-language pathologists and audiologists. See you next year, in Denver!

Christine Delfino is a second year master’s student in the Speech and Hearing Sciences Department at Arizona State University studying bilingual speech-language pathology. She was the first place winner of the 2014 Student Ethics Essay Award. She can be reached at cdelfino@asu.edu.

#ASHA14 Audiologist in the House

blogI have been attending the national ASHA convention since 2008 in Chicago, but this year is a special first for me–MY FIRST ASHA CONVENTION AS A CERTIFIED DOCTOR OF AUDIOLOGY!!! I started attending ASHA as undergraduate while still trying to determine if I wanted to study audiology or speech-language pathology. As an undergrad, ASHA was a little overwhelming. The graduate school fair and exhibit halls, as well as the many networking events, were greatly beneficial, but as I still didn’t have a concrete plan or field, my choice in sessions was eclectic and I don’t know how much I got out of them.

The next several years I served on the NSSLHA Executive Council as a delegate for Region 8 and then as a representative for Region 3, and even though I was “at convention” I was very busy with meetings and helping run NSSLHA Day and as such, didn’t get to many sessions. The networking has always continued to be phenomenal and I loved being emcee of the NSSLHA Battle of the Regions Knowledge Bowl, but I was missing out on sessions.

Last year, as a fourth year extern who was free of meeting and other responsibilities, I was finally able to attend as a regular attendee and found some great sessions (which after three-and-a-half years of grad school, I could understand), but this year will even top that as I now have a job as an educational audiologist and can search out sessions related to what I do on a daily basis.

I always look forward to continued networking and social events as well as the exhibit hall. I’ll be sure to check out Audiology Row, the opening plenary session and closing party (Where’s my owl with a letter inviting me to Hogwarts?). As I’ve been researching audiology sessions, I selected so many sessions and posters that were of potential interest that I’ve only got two slots that don’t have conflicting sessions. I’m working on whittling the list down, but there are some sessions I feel I need to catch. Management of School‐Age Children With Hearing Loss: From the Clinic to the Classroom (#1019) is one I feel will be particulary relevant. As I’m learning the ropes at my new job (I’m the only educational audiologist in a rural four-county area of Maryland), I’m rapidly discovering that regular follow-up with dispensing/managing audiologists is not something that always happens with my students due to geographic and socio-economic issues. As such, I’m starting to develop relationships with some of the audiologists at the Children’s Hospital a couple hours away where many students were initially fit.

I’m also looking forward to some sessions and posters on APD as working in the school, it is a “hot topic.” Disentangling Central Auditory Processing (CAP) Test Findings: A Road to Greater Clarity (#1110) , Differential Diagnosis & Intervention of Central Auditory Processing Disorders (#1405), and Treatment Efficacy of the Fast ForWord-Reading Program on Language in a Child With SLI/APD (6036 poster #136).

One final session I’m also very excited about is Noise Exposure & Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Among Rural Adolescents (#1492). The area in which I live and work has agriculture and aquaculture as two significant components of the local economy in addition to many recreational opportunities for noise exposure (hunting, shooting, ATVs, boating, etc) and I feel there will be opportunities to work on implementing some hearing conservation education at the high school level for many of the students I serve.

What are some of the sessions you’re looking forward to? See you in Orlando!

Caleb McNiece, AuD, CCC-A, is a new grad and educational audiologist for the Mid-Shore Special Education Consortium which serves four county school systems on Maryland’s eastern shore. Caleb is a former NSSLHA Executive Council member and is passionate about audiology students, audiology advocacy, pediatric audiology, and private practice.

Cooking up the Perfect ASHA 2014

shutterstock_159814334

What’s the perfect recipe for ASHA 2014? Blend together science, learning and practice. Add a pinch of party and a heaping of gratitude. Watch it grow for generations.

Like many SLP swallowologists, I’m a foodie. Expand that: I’m a bilingual (Spanish-speaking)-Canadian-American-Salsa-dancing-foodie-mama-dysphagia nut, ready for a stimulating convention getaway in Florida. Good thing ASHA has cooked-up a feast for the body and mind.

Coming from Boston, I’ll feel right at home Wednesday night at Minus5º Ice Bar for the ASHA-PAC Party. Drinking a cocktail in a glass made out of ice may make you swallow faster! Watch out! The icy architecture will cool us down as we discuss the latest political action on Capitol Hill.

On Thursday, ASHA promises “hot, hot, hot” at the The ASHFoundation Latin Party at Cuba Libre Restaurant & Rum Bar. After we swallow liquids, we can test solids from the award-winning chef Guillermo Pernot. Salsa lessons anyone?

But of course we won’t just be there to party– relaxing and dancing will help us learn better.

 

Gratitude for opportunities in Science & Learning

I love seeing my heroes at conventions. This year we are deeply saddened to have lost our pioneer in dysphagia, Jerilyn Logemann.

As we remember Logemann, we also need to remember to thank all our mentors. Take time to reflect on how much they have influenced you and your career. Who would I be today without teachers like Jay Rosenbeck, Joanne Robbins, and James Coyle during my master’s studies years ago? Thank you!

And not just mentors who you know directly, but those who are influencing the profession, too. Thank you Catriona Steele, University of Toronto, for pushing us to go global. She suggests an international consensus for diet texture terminology. How many names do we have for that safe-ish dysphagia diet between puree and regular? Here are a few: mechanical soft, ground, moist ground, chopped, mechanically altered…

Thank you Tessa Goldsmith, Partners MGH, for the very important exploration of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). SLPs are public health advocates. Michael Douglas was misdiagnosed three times, delaying his treatment by too many months. He said it started with a sore throat and sore gums behind his last molar. As rates of laryngeal cancer from smoking decline, HPV has emerged as the most common cause of oropharyngeal cancer. However, there are many differences between HPV-positive and HPV-negative cancers. Additionally, don’t miss a chance to see Katherine Hutcheson, of MD Anderson, who gave a fabulous series at the ASHA Healthcare & Business Institute this past April. Jeri Logemann co-authored a two-part series on Long-Term Dysphagia After Head & Neck Cancer. Thank you to her team for carrying the torch.

I appreciate how Dr James Coyle is like Socrates, probing with critical questions to seek the truth. His courses ask: Which side is up?; What’s wrong with my patient?; What are we doing and why?; and what can bedside swallowing examinations do and what can’t they do? Every SLP practicing in dysphagia has to take at least one of his courses. We will learn a lot of science that directly relates to our practice, while having fun! I try to capture his humor in my blogs.

Another thank you to the twilight session on Thursday, called “Eating is Not Just Swallowing.” Samantha Shune, University of Iowa, integrates “components of the broader mealtime process with our definition of swallowing.” I typically introduce my bedside swallowing evaluations with: “Your doctor wants me to evaluate your eating and swallowing.” However, I was once told at an old job to not say “eating,” because it was deemed unrelated to swallowing and swallowing impairment. I appreciate this session’s holistic perspective.

 

Generations of Discovery

ASHA conventions inspire growth. I have discovered that you can recreate your career at any age. After performing Modified Barium Swallow Studies for 15 years, I am beginning again in an extensive FEES training program.

This past April at the ASHA Healthcare & Business Institute, a group of us were sharing our dreams and goals for our careers. I realized that I love to constantly learn, synthesize, and share with others. One year ago, I never would have believed that I would start a dysphagia resource website and become an SLP blogger.

As us older generations teach the younger generations, we also need to thank the younger SLPs for inspiring us to keep it fresh. For me that meant finally embracing technology. It is technology that is helping ASHA members network and reach all corners of the globe.

Thank you, ASHA, for this feast!

 

Karen Sheffler, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1995. Karen has enjoyed medical speech pathology for 20 years. She is a member of the Dysphagia Research Society and the Special Interest Group 13: Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders. Karen obtained her BCS-S (Board Certified Specialist in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders) in August of 2012. She has lectured on dysphagia in the hospital setting, to dental students at the Tufts University Dental School, and on Lateral Medullary Syndrome at the 2011 ASHA convention. Special interests include neurological conditions, geriatrics, oral hygiene, and patient safety/risk management. Karen continues to work in acute care and is a consultant for SEC Medical. She started the website and blog www.SwallowStudy.com in May 2014. She has blog posts on ASHAsphere and www.DysphagiaCafe.com. Sheffler is one of four invited bloggers for ASHA’s 2014 Convention in Orlando.

ASHA 2014, Here I Come! It’s GO Time!

shutterstock_163286423

Usually, the word scheduling elicits shivers down my spine. Usually that means scheduling 60 kids into speech therapy slots without interrupting ELA, math, lunch, recess, music, PE, art, intervention, OT or PT. It’s an astronomical feat when SLPs complete schedules every year. In contrast, scheduling for ASHA 2014 in Orlando has been a breeze. I’m scheduling lunch dates, meet ups, pool time, and my favorite CEU opportunities! Scheduling for #ASHA14 in Orlando is very different from scheduling therapy clients.

 

I’ve booked my flight. I’ve texted friends and worked out transportation. I’ve got a place to stay! I’ve joined up with some of my blogging buddies and reserved a booth for the exhibitor hall. Most importantly, I’ve started picking out a schedule for the courses I will take in November. I am so looking forward to downloading the mobile app this year. Since most SLPs don’t have time to wait in line for three days for the new iPhone 6, I’m hoping my dinosaur 4s phone will make it until November. The app should make managing my conference schedule a snap.

 

The Program Planner has been an easy way to browse for courses. It’s more user-friendly than my IEP writing program and my Medicaid billing programs. You can browse through courses by keyword, author, title, etc. So far I’ve searched for topics that apply directly to my caseload. My search terms were “school,” “autism,” “evaluation,” “preschool,” “apraxia” and “AAC.” Here are seven sessions that I’ve chosen so far:

 

  1. I really think research is valuable and there is just so much to choose from. I am trying to pick courses that relate directly to me or courses that really excite and interest me. In my current job I’m doing two preschool evaluations per week. I’m having the ‘articulation, phonology, and apraxia’ conversation with parents every week as I explain characteristics of each and their differences. The presentation “Differential Diagnosis of Severe Phonological Disorder & Childhood Apraxia of Speech” by Matthews and Rvachew sounds like a great refresher. I’m hoping to find some more evaluation-specific courses before November.
  2. I’m thinking the Phillips, Soto, & Sullivan presentation called “Strategies for SLPs Working with Students with AAC Needs in Schools” sounds perfect for a lot of my caseload. I need strategies for AAC students so this should be a big help.
  3. I can’t wait to see “iPad to iPlay 2: Teaching Play to preschoolers through Apps” from Tara Roehl. I love my iPad so I can’t wait to see how she is using it to teach play in preschoolers. This is really a skill I’d love to pass on to my teachers and parents.
  4. On the other hand I’m always careful to limit screen time with my students. There is a presentation called “The Impact of Technology on Play Behaviors in Early Childhood“ from Hagstrom, Smith, Witherspoon. Hopefully once I listen to both presentations I’ll feel good about balance and not leave feeling conflicted!
  5. Michelle Garica Winner is presenting four times. I’m hoping to catch “ASD Treatment: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy & Mental Health Problems Associated With Social Learning Challenges” and “Implementation Science & Social Thinking®: Discovering Evidence in Our Own Backyard”. I love her work and just can’t wait to finally see her present in person.
  6. Barbara Fernandez from Smarty Ears is presenting about one of her apps for data collection and caseloads. I can’t wait to talk to her about all the new Smarty Ears apps coming out in the future so I’ll be hitting up the Smarty Ears booth.
  7. Lastly, I decided to search my schools to check out what the faculty at Ohio University and The Ohio State University are presenting. “Skiing, Horseback Riding, & Communication With Individuals With Complex Communication Needs: Experiences From Community Volunteers” sounds really interesting from McCarthy, Benigno, and Hajjar at Ohio University. They are presenting information on recreational activities for individuals with complex communication needs. Interviews were conducted with volunteers in adaptive sport programs in New England.

 

I don’t think we will have any typical celebrities at ASHA. At least not the kind you see on entertainment television every night. There will however be some #SLPcelebrities to be found! I searched two of my favorites to check when they will be presenting. Hopefully you’ll see me posting a #slpselfie with some of my favorites SLPs over the weekend in Orlando.

That initial scheduling took about 30 minutes and I didn’t have to email 20 different teachers. Scheduling for ASHA is way more fun than making a therapy schedule. Now the countdown begins!

 

 

Jenna Rayburn, MA, CCC-SLP, is a school-based speech-language pathologist from Columbus, Ohio. She writes at her blog, Speech Room News. You can follow her on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest. Jenna is one of four guest bloggers for ASHA’s convention in Orlando.

How to Prepare to Speak at ASHA Convention for the First Time

shutterstock_167350049

This year I will be presenting at the ASHA Convention for the first time. The first time I attended an ASHA convention was last year in 2013. I enjoyed the sessions I attended and set a goal to speak at an ASHA convention sometime during my career. Thanks to partnering with amazing SLPs across the country I was able to  propose five sessions for the 2014 convention. Even though I felt that each proposal was an exciting topic, I did not expect all five to be accepted as talks (or get accepted at all). But that is exactly what happened. My first time speaking at the ASHA convention, I will be involved in five sessions. Due to scheduling conflicts, I will be speaking at only four of the sessions (see below for details). So how am I going to prepare for this? Here are three things:

 

1. Stay organized. Juggling the preparation for five sessions is not easy, so organization is key. I am reducing repetitive and inefficient work by only working on presentations at specific times. To respect my fellow presenters, I am communicating when I will be able to complete individual tasks. I schedule my presentation work sessions based on established deadlines.

Working with many co-presenters (all across the country) means many emails about our presentations. I created a file folder in my email for each presentation. I file each email in the presentation’s folder. This keeps everything together in case I need to refer back to details such as deadlines, ideas, to-do lists, and plans.

I have coordinating file folders in Google Drive for document storage (e.g. proposals, slide deck drafts, my presentation notes, etc). All the documents for each presentation are kept together. Since it’s all in the cloud, I won’t leave it behind.

 

2. Reduce inconveniences. The worst part about conventions and traveling for training for me is food. I have Celiac disease and other food allergies. Convention halls aren’t the best venue for finding gluten free, healthy food. Last year I spent $20+ on lunch, when I bought a sandwich with no bread or fries (because they were fried in the same fryer as gluten) and put the meat on top of a salad. I essentially bought 2 lunches to create one lunch (and I was still hungry).

So this time, I am doing myself a favor and anticipating a busy schedule and poor food options. I found a company that will make premade meals and deliver them to my hotel (for a lot less than $20). My hotel room has a fridge, so I will keep the premade meals in the fridge and bring lunch with me. I will not waste time on long lines or risk  getting sick.

 

3. Prepare for fun. The ASHA convention isn’t my first speaking engagement as an SLP. I have been speaking about dementia and ethics in healthcare to my fellow SLPs, other healthcare professionals, students, and family members via webinars, courses, video conferences, etc. I keep doing it because it’s fun! I thoroughly enjoy creating a presentation for a specific audience to help them reach their goals. My career has evolved into spending the majority of my time in an education role. For a former teacher, this is a very welcome evolution.

 

The pre-presentation nervousness comes, but reminding myself that each speaking opportunity is an opportunity for fun and to inspire better dementia treatment and elder care relieves my jitters quickly. I am thankful for each and every opportunity, including the several at ASHA’s convention this year. See you there!

 

Rachel Wynn is one of four guest bloggers for ASHA’s convention in Orlando and will be speaking at the following sessions:

 

Friday, November 21, 2014

  • Clients at risk for suicide: Our experiences and responsibilities (Session Code 1310) 8:00-10:00 a.m.
  • Get out of that box! Four creative mold-breaking models of private practice (Session Code 1441) 3:30-4:30 p.m.

 

Saturday, November 22, 2014

  • Social media for SLPs: Leveraging online platforms to connect and advance your practice (Session Code 1704) 1:00-2:00 p.m. (Not presenting due to scheduling)
  • Dementia 101 for students and new clinicians: Changing lives through a functional approach (Session Code 1720) 1:00-2:00 p.m.
  • Productivity pressures in SNFs: Bottom up and top down advocacy (Session Code 1755) 2:30-3:30pm

 

Rachel Wynn, MS, CCC-SLP, specializes in eldercare, and, as the owner of Gray Matter Therapy, provides education to therapists, healthcare professionals, and families regarding dementia and elder care. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 15 (Gerontology) and an advocate for ethical elder care and improving workplace environments, including clinical autonomy, for clinicians.