ASHA 2014, Here I Come! It’s GO Time!

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Usually, the word scheduling elicits shivers down my spine. Usually that means scheduling 60 kids into speech therapy slots without interrupting ELA, math, lunch, recess, music, PE, art, intervention, OT or PT. It’s an astronomical feat when SLPs complete schedules every year. In contrast, scheduling for ASHA 2014 in Orlando has been a breeze. I’m scheduling lunch dates, meet ups, pool time, and my favorite CEU opportunities! Scheduling for #ASHA14 in Orlando is very different from scheduling therapy clients.

 

I’ve booked my flight. I’ve texted friends and worked out transportation. I’ve got a place to stay! I’ve joined up with some of my blogging buddies and reserved a booth for the exhibitor hall. Most importantly, I’ve started picking out a schedule for the courses I will take in November. I am so looking forward to downloading the mobile app this year. Since most SLPs don’t have time to wait in line for three days for the new iPhone 6, I’m hoping my dinosaur 4s phone will make it until November. The app should make managing my conference schedule a snap.

 

The Program Planner has been an easy way to browse for courses. It’s more user-friendly than my IEP writing program and my Medicaid billing programs. You can browse through courses by keyword, author, title, etc. So far I’ve searched for topics that apply directly to my caseload. My search terms were “school,” “autism,” “evaluation,” “preschool,” “apraxia” and “AAC.” Here are seven sessions that I’ve chosen so far:

 

  1. I really think research is valuable and there is just so much to choose from. I am trying to pick courses that relate directly to me or courses that really excite and interest me. In my current job I’m doing two preschool evaluations per week. I’m having the ‘articulation, phonology, and apraxia’ conversation with parents every week as I explain characteristics of each and their differences. The presentation “Differential Diagnosis of Severe Phonological Disorder & Childhood Apraxia of Speech” by Matthews and Rvachew sounds like a great refresher. I’m hoping to find some more evaluation-specific courses before November.
  2. I’m thinking the Phillips, Soto, & Sullivan presentation called “Strategies for SLPs Working with Students with AAC Needs in Schools” sounds perfect for a lot of my caseload. I need strategies for AAC students so this should be a big help.
  3. I can’t wait to see “iPad to iPlay 2: Teaching Play to preschoolers through Apps” from Tara Roehl. I love my iPad so I can’t wait to see how she is using it to teach play in preschoolers. This is really a skill I’d love to pass on to my teachers and parents.
  4. On the other hand I’m always careful to limit screen time with my students. There is a presentation called “The Impact of Technology on Play Behaviors in Early Childhood“ from Hagstrom, Smith, Witherspoon. Hopefully once I listen to both presentations I’ll feel good about balance and not leave feeling conflicted!
  5. Michelle Garica Winner is presenting four times. I’m hoping to catch “ASD Treatment: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy & Mental Health Problems Associated With Social Learning Challenges” and “Implementation Science & Social Thinking®: Discovering Evidence in Our Own Backyard”. I love her work and just can’t wait to finally see her present in person.
  6. Barbara Fernandez from Smarty Ears is presenting about one of her apps for data collection and caseloads. I can’t wait to talk to her about all the new Smarty Ears apps coming out in the future so I’ll be hitting up the Smarty Ears booth.
  7. Lastly, I decided to search my schools to check out what the faculty at Ohio University and The Ohio State University are presenting. “Skiing, Horseback Riding, & Communication With Individuals With Complex Communication Needs: Experiences From Community Volunteers” sounds really interesting from McCarthy, Benigno, and Hajjar at Ohio University. They are presenting information on recreational activities for individuals with complex communication needs. Interviews were conducted with volunteers in adaptive sport programs in New England.

 

I don’t think we will have any typical celebrities at ASHA. At least not the kind you see on entertainment television every night. There will however be some #SLPcelebrities to be found! I searched two of my favorites to check when they will be presenting. Hopefully you’ll see me posting a #slpselfie with some of my favorites SLPs over the weekend in Orlando.

That initial scheduling took about 30 minutes and I didn’t have to email 20 different teachers. Scheduling for ASHA is way more fun than making a therapy schedule. Now the countdown begins!

 

 

Jenna Rayburn, MA, CCC-SLP, is a school-based speech-language pathologist from Columbus, Ohio. She writes at her blog, Speech Room News. You can follow her on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest. Jenna is one of four guest bloggers for ASHA’s convention in Orlando.

How to Prepare to Speak at ASHA Convention for the First Time

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This year I will be presenting at the ASHA Convention for the first time. The first time I attended an ASHA convention was last year in 2013. I enjoyed the sessions I attended and set a goal to speak at an ASHA convention sometime during my career. Thanks to partnering with amazing SLPs across the country I was able to  propose five sessions for the 2014 convention. Even though I felt that each proposal was an exciting topic, I did not expect all five to be accepted as talks (or get accepted at all). But that is exactly what happened. My first time speaking at the ASHA convention, I will be involved in five sessions. Due to scheduling conflicts, I will be speaking at only four of the sessions (see below for details). So how am I going to prepare for this? Here are three things:

 

1. Stay organized. Juggling the preparation for five sessions is not easy, so organization is key. I am reducing repetitive and inefficient work by only working on presentations at specific times. To respect my fellow presenters, I am communicating when I will be able to complete individual tasks. I schedule my presentation work sessions based on established deadlines.

Working with many co-presenters (all across the country) means many emails about our presentations. I created a file folder in my email for each presentation. I file each email in the presentation’s folder. This keeps everything together in case I need to refer back to details such as deadlines, ideas, to-do lists, and plans.

I have coordinating file folders in Google Drive for document storage (e.g. proposals, slide deck drafts, my presentation notes, etc). All the documents for each presentation are kept together. Since it’s all in the cloud, I won’t leave it behind.

 

2. Reduce inconveniences. The worst part about conventions and traveling for training for me is food. I have Celiac disease and other food allergies. Convention halls aren’t the best venue for finding gluten free, healthy food. Last year I spent $20+ on lunch, when I bought a sandwich with no bread or fries (because they were fried in the same fryer as gluten) and put the meat on top of a salad. I essentially bought 2 lunches to create one lunch (and I was still hungry).

So this time, I am doing myself a favor and anticipating a busy schedule and poor food options. I found a company that will make premade meals and deliver them to my hotel (for a lot less than $20). My hotel room has a fridge, so I will keep the premade meals in the fridge and bring lunch with me. I will not waste time on long lines or risk  getting sick.

 

3. Prepare for fun. The ASHA convention isn’t my first speaking engagement as an SLP. I have been speaking about dementia and ethics in healthcare to my fellow SLPs, other healthcare professionals, students, and family members via webinars, courses, video conferences, etc. I keep doing it because it’s fun! I thoroughly enjoy creating a presentation for a specific audience to help them reach their goals. My career has evolved into spending the majority of my time in an education role. For a former teacher, this is a very welcome evolution.

 

The pre-presentation nervousness comes, but reminding myself that each speaking opportunity is an opportunity for fun and to inspire better dementia treatment and elder care relieves my jitters quickly. I am thankful for each and every opportunity, including the several at ASHA’s convention this year. See you there!

 

Rachel Wynn is one of four guest bloggers for ASHA’s convention in Orlando and will be speaking at the following sessions:

 

Friday, November 21, 2014

  • Clients at risk for suicide: Our experiences and responsibilities (Session Code 1310) 8:00-10:00 a.m.
  • Get out of that box! Four creative mold-breaking models of private practice (Session Code 1441) 3:30-4:30 p.m.

 

Saturday, November 22, 2014

  • Social media for SLPs: Leveraging online platforms to connect and advance your practice (Session Code 1704) 1:00-2:00 p.m. (Not presenting due to scheduling)
  • Dementia 101 for students and new clinicians: Changing lives through a functional approach (Session Code 1720) 1:00-2:00 p.m.
  • Productivity pressures in SNFs: Bottom up and top down advocacy (Session Code 1755) 2:30-3:30pm

 

Rachel Wynn, MS, CCC-SLP, specializes in eldercare, and, as the owner of Gray Matter Therapy, provides education to therapists, healthcare professionals, and families regarding dementia and elder care. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 15 (Gerontology) and an advocate for ethical elder care and improving workplace environments, including clinical autonomy, for clinicians.

The #ASHA12 Experience

I would like to start off by thanking ASHA by selecting me to be one of this year’s Official Bloggers. This year’s convention was a fabulous experience all around.  From Maya Angelou’s inspirational opening ceremony talk to the tear-jerking Annie Glenn award ceremony. To have followed Gabby Gifford’s recovery effort and then watch her accept the award was very moving.  This was all followed by a pretty awesome closing ceremony at the Georgia Aquarium, which totally blew last year’s “lawn party” out of the water, excuse my pun.   I mean who could beat watching some sharks swim by with a few thousand other SLPs?

In between all the events I mentioned above were, of course, some great sessions, a huge exhibit hall, and a maze of a convention center. I literally got lost a few times. The two highlights of the convention for me was getting to participate in NSSLHA Day and meeting all the fabulous #slpeeps that interact over Twitter all year round.

For NSSLHA Day I presented a crash course entitled iPads and Apps. This was a blast and I got to meet some awesome grad students who were eager to learn about some awesome apps to use in therapy. I also got this nifty certificate of appreciation and recognition. Thanks again NSSLHA!

Like I mentioned earlier meeting the #slpeeps from around country was so much fun. We learn a lot from each other throughout the year so it’s always such a neat experience to meet these great therapists in person. There were over 30 #slpeeps that met for dinner on the Wednesday before ASHA started and several more that met for ASHA’s official Tweetup. If you haven’t considered Twitter or social media I highly recommend that you look into it and start building your personal learning network (PLN)! Oh and in case you missed it there was also a flash mob that was organized by PediaStaff and two of the #slpeeps Aubrey Klingensmith and Mai Ling Chan.

One of my favorite sessions at #ASHA12 was Sara Ward’s on Executive Function. It was two solid hours of practical idea after idea. These were the type of ideas that could be implemented immediately and work.  One of the big takeaways from the session was here concept of “future glasses” that kids put on to help them envision what the final outcome of what they are working on should look like. This helps with organization and time management. Genius! That’s all I have to say.

So as I finish writing this post I will place on my Future Glasses and look forward to what #ASHA13 will bring us.

(Jeremy is one of the official ASHA Convention bloggers. These three bloggers were selected to blog about the ASHA Convention in exchange for complimentary registration. Stay tuned for more insights from him and the other bloggers before, during and after convention.)

 

Jeremy Legaspi, CCC-SLP, is a Speech-Language Pathologist at Foundations Developmental House. He concentrates on autism, AAC, apraxia, articulation,phonlogy, and some feeding. You can follow him on twitter @azspeechguy and check him out on azspeechguy.wordpress.com andwww.therapyapp411.com

A New Song

At the 2012 ASHA Convention in Atlanta I wondered at the unique set of peoples I encountered. Everyone was eager to join sessions, share ideas, and offer words of encouragement to the newbies like me. There wasn’t a hint of selfishness of information; what helps one professional has the possibility to help thousands more when shared. The amount of evidence displayed and excellence of clinical translation encouraged everyone who attended. Since this was my first convention, I was astounded at the amount of work others from around the country are doing to advance the science and techniques of the profession…and I thought I was busy?!

In Dr. Maya Angelou’s key note address, she said “A bird doesn’t sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song.” We all have a song to sing in the form of our profession. We perform our job based on evidence and training; yet it is more than that. There is a calling to help each patient, caregiver, and family, not out of a sense of duty; rather, from a sense of purpose and resolve to impact and further another person’s recovery and development.

Where is all the evidence going once it is presented in sessions or posters? When a presenter outlined an idea to change an approach based on new evidence, did you feel compelled to consider it? While I have yet to fully work as an SLP, I’m developing an idea of how easy it is to become complacent in “what works.” The theme for the convention “Evidence of Excellence” hinged on the idea that evidence drives our excellence as professionals.  Merely hearing the song of others’ research and results doesn’t seem like enough. Application and translation of research is what the ASHA Conventions are all about, no matter the theme. A time to gather as a profession and hear what is being done to improve and propel us all. I don’t want to sing the same song for the rest of my professional and personal life; I’m hoping I’m open enough to grow and develop along with our profession. Are you?

The 2013 ASHA Convention will be in Chicago, Illinois. I plan to attend in order to let my song be heard. Will you? Whatever the theme may be, you can rest assured the people met and sessions attended will give you a new song to sing with even greater enthusiasm and excitement. See you there!!

(Katie is one of the official ASHA Convention bloggers. These three bloggers were selected to blog about the ASHA Convention in exchange for complimentary registration. Stay tuned for more insights from her and the other bloggers before, during and after convention.)

 

Katie Millican, B.S. Ed., is a second year graduate student in Speech-Language Pathology program at the University of West Georgia (UWG). Katie is the current UWG local NSSLHA chapter President.  She is active with the #slpeeps and #slp2b on Twitter (@SLP_Echo) and on Pinterest, and she writes her own blog SLP_Echo: Just another SLP in the Making. Katie has a passion for using technology and sharing evidence-based ideas. 

Autism: Three-Word Phrases to Supported Conversations in 18 Months

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Photo by Tsahi Levent-Levi

Just settling back in from the whirlwind trip to Atlanta, Georgia.  ASHA, once again surpassed itself in excellence.  My kitchen table is a mass of brochures, notes and folders; re-organized into priority piles.  The exhibit hall was replete with samples and gadgets.  Now, what to do with that little planter of wheat grass?  Yes, I live in northern California; one would think I’d blend that stuff right up in my morning “green drink,” but I think I’ll find another home for it instead.

And, reaching in my zipper-top ASHA bag, there’s more: a pink flamingo clip, a recycled “use your own” grocery bag, a pamphlet on social networking, plenty of memories.  Notwithstanding the seminars and short courses which offered a mountain of new information.

I contributed “my rock” of new information this year, too.  I had the honor of presenting a case study of an Autistic teen’s language development over an 18 month period.  Presenting at ASHA is not new to me, but each time it confirms the fact that we, “ in the trenches” daily clinicians, as opposed to university researchers,  have much to offer our colleagues.

ASHA is interested in what we are doing out in the field.  Small treatment programs and case studies contribute as much as research coming out of the more prominent universities.  ASHA is interested not so much whether a given treatment “worked” (as that word is nebulous in itself) but what did it change? And, how did it change?

So, this case study was a sequential presentation of video clips demonstrating an 18 year-old autistic male’s changes in sentence structure, vocabulary and vocal prosody as he learned from video feedback and the use of a speech generating device. The changes over time have been dramatic and offer us windows into understanding how communication skills can change via use of technology.

Treatment is evidence-based, as I took the best available research about children with autism and video monitoring and then applied my clinical best-practice knowledge, along with his values and interests. Computers enthralled him and Disney is his favorite subject!  His comments confirm this.

Combining the use of point-of-view virtual feedback, audio and video self-editing, self-modeling, repetition and practice speaking with a monitor rather than a person, we witnessed movement starting with our teen bolting perseverative repetitive words and phrases across to phases of dependence on written scripts or memorized lines through his success with short supported conversations.

The videos showed a continuum of his vocal changes and the sweet exploration of facial expressions related to his intentions of message delivery. We also watched his ever-growing vocabulary, including the use of temporal and spatial relationships.

Seminar attendees fell in love with this charming young man as they learned how he mastered the use of a speech generating device, including developing his own customized digital icon library as well as video editing and review. They learned how he independently wrote and recorded his own comments and attached them to his personal photos, all in an effort to share the events in his life.

Current Technology

This case study offered a readily-attainable speech and language treatment utilizing a speech generating device for delivering supported and self-study techniques.  The Lingraphica speech generating device (SGD)  offers immediate video feedback, a built-in icon library w/customizing capacity and ease of navigation which can promote patient self-use within this particular population.

Besides considering the use of a *Lingraphica SGD (utilized in the study), one might be creative and use a tablet, a laptop with a video camera, or an app which would lenditself to video modeling techniques.  The course demonstrated how existing research and the availability of developing standardized communication models for independent practice outside of the therapy environment, can substantiate a treatment model of cost efficiency.  The new formula of  “treatment / cost = value” is alive and well with this treatment model, which focuses on extensive independent study. 

Did you miss the session?  You may still be able to download the handout which gives an overview and bibliography.  I have been using some of the same techniques with my other patients and keeping close track of their changes.  Stay tuned; we may see significant outcomes with other populations as well.

I am in the process of developing an online CEU course which you could download with these wonderful video-clips.  So, to whet your appetite for more; here are two clips from the course.  First, a baseline and then a delightful supported conversation Talking about what?  Disney, of course.  Enjoy the videos.

 

*Disclaimer:  I have no fiduciary relationship with either Lingraphicare or Disney Productions.

 

Nancy Horowitz Moilanen, M.A. CCC-SLP; Private practice, Northern CA, 35 yrs.;  Director, Well Together Neuro Rehabtm, a group therapy program utilizing music and community-building as a rehab model;  Presenter ASHA, 2010 & 2012;  ASHAsphere Blogger, Communication Wellbeing and Social Wellbeing…an Aspect of Health, January 2011, Graduate ASHA Leadership in Health program, 2011; ASHA Leadership in Health program graduate presenter, 2012. A proud member of SLPeeps, Facebook’s social networking site.

 

 

Happy Peppy People at ASHA 2012

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“Hello friends. Are you tired, run-down, listless? Do you poop out at parties? Why don’t you join the thousands of happy peppy people…” at the 2012 ASHA Convention.  If this famous I Love Lucy script makes you think your convention experience thus far, then you are not alone.  Between walking from the Exhibit Hall to visit the vendors to checking out the NSSLHA Lounge and Poster Presentations, just navigating the convention can wear a person out.

Despite the many weary feet, the excitement from day 1 has been tangible. Waiting in line for coffee, finding the room number for sessions, or collecting your third Super Duper bag,  you can always find someone to share a conversation with. How often do you know everyone around you is an SLP or AUD, and feel comfortable discussing a therapy technique or a new iPad application while waiting in line?  The convention provides professionals from across the country opportunities to reconnect with colleagues and friends, refine intervention strategies and techniques, and renew the excitement and zeal for being “rainbows in the clouds” of our clients.

As a student, not only is attending sessions part of the allure of attending the convention, but meeting and networking with professionals who have knowledge and experience to share has been invaluable. Everyone I have met and shared a conversation with has been more than willing to relay tips for my SLP-CF job search or strategies for interviewing and negotiating a contract. I still get nervous before speaking with SLPs or AUDs, but I hope those I speak with remember what it felt like to be a student: Excited, nervous, stressed, overwhelmed, and just itching to finish our clinical internships. The convention is a chance for everyone to “nerd out” with other SLP students, professionals, professors, and researchers from across the world; it is like Christmas morning for me.

What was my favorite part of the 2012 ASHA Convention?

One of the highlights for me was meeting the SLPs, AUDs, and other student SLPs that I have met through Twitter over the past year. Many people are still apprehensive or unaware of the professional learning opportunities that wait by using Twitter with the #SLPeeps. Heidi Kay over at Pediastaff recruited some of the best SLPs who use social media as professional tools to create a Free Guidebook to help people get started. If you want to see how to use these tools, please check out the  easy to follow electronic book and start growing professionally with the #SLPeeps.

Another one of the highlights from the convention was hearing Dr. Maya Angelou speak at the opening session. Her powerful storytelling inspired me professionally and personally. She compared SLPs and AUDs to rainbows in the clouds. A rainbow speaks of promise and hope; I would like to think I can be that for my clients.  Her personal tale of selective mutism after a childhood trauma empowered me to always consider the perspective of my clients before jumping to conclusions.  She always had a story to tell; as Speech-Language Pathologists and Audiologists, accepting and establishing trust can impact how much of their story a client decides to share.

(Katie is one of the official ASHA Convention bloggers. These three bloggers were selected to blog about the ASHA Convention in exchange for complimentary registration. Stay tuned for more insights from her and the other bloggers before, during and after convention.)

 

Katie Millican, B.S. Ed., is a second year graduate student in Speech-Language Pathology program at the University of West Georgia (UWG). Katie is the current UWG local NSSLHA chapter President.  She is active with the #slpeeps and #slp2b on Twitter (@SLP_Echo) and on Pinterest, and she writes her own blog SLP_Echo: Just another SLP in the Making. Katie has a passion for using technology and sharing evidence-based ideas. 

Convention Must-Have: Twitter

I was really excited when I was selected to become an official ASHA blogger.  I blog anyway, so it was nice to get an official title.  I had planned on blogging a little everyday, but things have been crazy and before I know it, it’s time for bed.  I decided to go ahead and blog on Friday, the next to last day of the convention!

Throughout convention I kept hearing “how do you incorporate Twitter into therapy?” or “so how do you use Twitter?”  It seems there is either a lot of resistance to Twitter or people just really have no idea how to use it or how to get started.

Originally, I intended to write about my trip here, the sessions I attended, etc., but I think I’ll save that for later and instead write about Twitter.

I started my Twitter account about two or three years ago, around the time of my first ASHA Convention.  As much as I enjoyed the convention, I really didn’t socialize a lot or leave my hotel room other than to go  to sessions.   Through that convention, I started getting more involved in Twitter and started forming friendships there.

The 2011 convention was so much better having such a large group of friends to spend time with and share my ASHA Convention excitement.

This year has been a whole new experience.  I have a much larger group of friends, a really great roommate and amazing opportunities coming my way, all thanks to Twitter.   We had a great “Tweet up” this year with many new and familiar faces.  It’s always so nice to meet those people you’ve been talking to online.

How do I use Twitter?  I use it in so many different ways.   I ask and answer therapy questions through Twitter.  We have a whole network of SLPs called the #SLPeeps.  We have specialty people in various areas: literacy, fluency, technology, apps  and dysphagia.

I use Twitter to announce changes to my website, new blog posts, exciting news like earning my BRS-S, and to share links to videos or websites that I find relevant or interesting. I use it to share important information at ASHA from professional development sessions that I attend, or CEU events that I attend outside of ASHA.  If I find a really great session, I share that.  If I find a new product, I’m excited to talk about it and let others know.

So many people say they don’t have time for Twitter.  I can access Twitter on my phone and on my iPad, allowing me to post a Tweet any time of day.  I can post on Twitter in just a few minutes.  It’s really only as time-consuming as I allow it to be.

When I talk to people about Twitter, I tell them that’s it’s an excellent learning opportunity for me and a way that I have met many new friends that I may not have otherwise met.    I proudly wear my “I Tweet” and “#SLPeeps” ribbons on my badge and tell everyone who asks me about Twitter that it has been one of the most life-changing opportunities I have experienced.

(Tiffani is one of the official ASHA Convention bloggers. These three bloggers were selected to blog about the ASHA Convention in exchange for complimentary registration. Stay tuned for more insights from her and the other bloggers before, during and after convention.)

 

Tiffani Wallace,CCC-SLP, has been an SLP specializing in Dysphagia for over 11 years.  Tiffani has been very active in the social media world, creating 2 Facebook groups, Dysphagia Therapy Group and Dysphagia Therapy Group-Professional Edition.  Tiffani is also the co-author of the app Dysphagia2Go, available on iTunes.  She is preparing to travel nationally and speak on the topic of Dysphagia.  Tiffani writes a blog called Dysphagia Ramblings and is the author of www.dysphagiaramblings.com.  She is a 5 time ACE awardee and recently obtained her BRS-S.

Pre-ASHA Convention Blog Roundup

2012 ASHA Convention logo

At long last, the 2012 ASHA Convention is upon us! If you’re either already in Atlanta or heading there, here are some links to helpful posts by fellow attendees, both past and present:

  • Tara Roehl gives instructions on how to create your convention schedule using Google Docs.
  • Aubrey Klingensmith has reated an “#ASHA12 Survival Guide” of apps that might come in handy during Convention.
  • Ruth Morgan has scoped out Atlanta for gluten-free options and offers some great suggestions for those who can’t just grab a quick bagel or a muffin during Convention.
  • While Kristin Mosman unfortunately won’t be attending this year, she has compiled a great list of things she wishes she’d known before attending past ASHA Conventions.
  • Ready to finally bite the bullet and learn what all this social media stuff is about, but not sure where to start? Lucky for you there will be many resources at Convention to help. There is an invited session on Thursday at 10:30 am (Session #1003) “A How-To of Social Media: Technologies, Trends and Traps.” I will be attending Convention from Thursday through Saturday and happy to help give hands-on help with the ASHA Community and/or any other social media question you may have. I’ll be splitting my time between the Volunteer Village, the exhibit hall and various events including the ASHA Tweetup on Friday at 5 pm in the Leader Lounge. Finally, the #slpeeps and #audpeeps have paired up with Pediastaff and will be offering many different social media resources including a learning lab, a social media learning center, and several “Tweet & Greet” sessions.

If you aren’t attending this year’s convention, stay tuned to ASHAsphere for updates from the official ASHAsphere Convention bloggers, as well as follow-up posts from other attendees. You can also watch from afar on Twitter by following @ASHAconv and the #asha12 hashtag. And you don’t have to suffer alone–there’s even a hashtag for those who aren’t able to be at Convention: #ashaless!

 

Maggie McGary is the online community & social media manager at ASHA, and manages ASHAsphere.

Southern Charm at #ASHA12

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Where the food is fried and the tea is sweet, Atlanta promises to be a great host for the 2012 ASHA Convention. It’s only appropriate that my first-ever ASHA Convention is in my home state. I’ve been living in a Graduate School cocoon for the past year, so it will be fun to take off my speechie training wheels and revel in the knowledge and fun. I have been reading and listening to the #ASHA12 hype on Twitter and blogs, which makes me even more excited for the three-day event. I keep finding sessions I want to attend, like the First Timers Orientation, the pre-convention session “The iPad & Your Therapy: Apps, Accessories, Accessibility, & Features,” or “Laryngeal Manipulation: Why, When, & How.” Then there are the vendors I don’t want to miss like Pediastaff (Booth #1823), LessonPix (Booth #617), and Tactus Therapy (Booth #828). So many excellent sessions and vendors to choose from; how are you deciding which ones to attend?

The annual ASHA Convention seems like the best opportunity to learn the newest techniques, listen to what others have been doing, and determine the best way to not seem overly creepy with excitement for this profession. Since I am almost done with graduate school, everything seems to revolve around my enthusiasm for our diverse profession. I’m just trying to take advantage of all these amazing sessions and vendors in one place without overwhelming myself. How are you keeping it all straight? I’ve received the most support from the #slpeeps on Twitter. Based on their stories and advice, I think I can control myself enough to attend sessions and still have equal amounts of fun.

I’m also looking forward to dining around the Georgia World Congress Center. There are so many great places to choose from like Googie Burger, Taco Mac, Der Biergarten, Park Avenue  Deli & Market, and so many others right around the convention center. If you are new to the Atlanta area and plan to leave time to venture further out, consider The Varsity, Max Lager’s Wood-Fired Grill & Brewery, The Vortex, or Ormsby’s. Wherever you choose, I hope you enjoy the beautiful city of Atlanta.

I would also like to take a moment to impart some southern charm upon the excitement of #asha12. Especially to those who have also never been, or to those may not be as excited as they’ve been in previous years:

  • To all of the seasoned, flavorful, and spicy SLPs, I look forward to meeting you at the convention. I will giving away handshakes if you can find me (@SLP_Echo) during the convention (Get ‘em while they’re hot)
  • To my fellow SLP graduate and undergraduate friends, let us convene upon Atlanta with our eagerness to learn and willingness to volunteer for anything.
  • To my fellow #slpeeps, may we entice new SLPs to join the Twitterverse.
  • To those who slaved over a poster presentation, oral session, technical session, or any other session, may those who attend the sessions bring enough enthusiasm it’s worth every minute.
  • To those attending the Wednesday workshops by GSHA , may the extra day in Atlanta make you want to eat peaches and  drink Coca-Cola till you have a southern accent.
  • To those who are dancing in the flash mob (aka #ashamob), may people appreciate the happiness it brings as well as the eloquence of the ‘booty roll’.
  • To the adventurous #asha12 attendee, may you fill up on southern comfort food and fall prey to using “Ya’ll” at least once while you are here.

Keep track of all the happenings before, during, and after the convention on Twitter and ASHAsphere. Wait, what’s that? You don’t use Twitter?? Well, don’t be shy; join the ranks and check out how to get started here.  Can’t wait to see everyone at the 2012 ASHA Convention in Atlanta, GA!!

(Katie is one of the official ASHA Convention bloggers. These three bloggers were selected to blog about the ASHA Convention in exchange for complimentary registration. Stay tuned for more insights from her and the other bloggers before, during and after convention.)

 

Katie Millican, B.S. Ed., is a second year graduate student in Speech-Language Pathology program at the University of West Georgia (UWG). Katie is the current UWG local NSSLHA chapter President.  She is active with the #slpeeps and #slp2b on Twitter (@SLP_Echo) and on Pinterest, and she writes her own blog SLP_Echo: Just another SLP in the Making. Katie has a passion for using technology and sharing evidence-based ideas. 

 

#ASHA12 Infographic

If you’re following the 2012 ASHA Convention hashtag #ASHA12 on Twitter, you know that the excitement has reached a fever pitch with just one week to go. Here, in infographic form, are some tips to help you navigate Convention.

For more detail on how to customize your own planner as I mention in tip 1 above, here’s another post detailing how I did it.

(Jeremy is one of the official ASHA Convention bloggers. These three bloggers were selected to blog about the ASHA Convention in exchange for complimentary registration. Stay tuned for more insights from him and the other bloggers before, during and after convention.)

 

Jeremy Legaspi, CCC-SLP, is a Speech-Language Pathologist at Foundations Developmental House. He concentrates on autism, AAC, apraxia, articulation,phonlogy, and some feeding. You can follow him on twitter @azspeechguy and check him out on azspeechguy.wordpress.com and www.therapyapp411.com