Coaching Parents to Foster Their Child’s Expressive Language Skills

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I recently had the opportunity to provide tele-speech-language services to a toddler with autism spectrum disorder. I knew it would be difficult to have him sit in front of a computer for long periods, so I decided that I would employ a “parent coaching” approach, empowering his parents to more effectively help their son.

I started by having the parents videotape their daily interactions with him, which revealed that they were aware of their son’s difficulties and in-tune with his communication needs. However, even though this little boy appeared quite bright, it was difficult to distinguish when he was answering a question from what he had learned, or if it was a rote response. The parents had specific goals they wanted their son to achieve, so how was I going to help them?

I provided the boy’s parents with information about expressive language development and explained that their expectations appeared to be beyond this child’s current capabilities (determined by the boy’s age, as well as his disability). Next I took the language and vocabulary skills the parents wanted their son to learn—such as labeling an apple—and broke them out into smaller steps. These are the types of activities I suggest parents use to help a child grasp a language concept:

  • Present the child with several apples, preferably of different colors.
  • Talk about the outside of the apples: color, shape, size, smell, taste and texture.
  • Cut open the apples (“What do you see?”) , and eat some of each, talking about how it sounds and tastes as you bite into each piece.
  • Cut an apple in half horizontally and use washable tempera paints to make apple prints on paper using the different colors apples can be.
  • Find a simple recipe to make applesauce or another food from apples.
  • Eat apple slices with peanut butter and talk about how it tastes, and about the messiness and stickiness.
  • Make a pretend apple out of PlayDoh.
  • Compare the “fake” apple with the real one, explaining that you can eat a “real” apple but not the “pretend.” This models analytical thinking.
  • Bring in another fruit, such as an orange, and do the same steps.
  • Try making and drinking homemade orange juice.
  • Compare an apple to an orange.
  • Show video clips of people picking apples and oranges, showing how both grow on a tree.
  • Add bananas, doing the first seven steps (tastes great with peanut butter).
  • Roll the items across the floor and talk about how they roll. Compare.
  • Use this method to teach about common fruits you either purchase or see in the market.

Of course, just relating these steps to parents isn’t enough, because they have a tendency to take over for their child if they see the child struggling. For example, it’s tempting for them to place the child’s hands on the paper to make the apple prints, which removes the child from the process and leads to a loss of interest. To help parents avoid this, I explain that learning involves making mistakes. Other suggestions I provide include:

  • When speaking to your child, keep your sentences simple and to the point (approximately three to four words per utterance: “Are you hungry?” versus “Are you ready to go have some sandwiches for lunch?” Expanding utterances will come along a bit later!
  • Speak slowly because it may take the child additional time to process the information.
  • Do not require the child to look you in the eye when you are speaking to him. A glance at your face, especially at this age, should suffice. Toddlers are busy-bodies and need to keep moving and exploring.
  • If you ask a child a comprehension question, he or she may provide a quick or rote answer to be able to do what he wants to do.
  • Allow time to just play with your child. Let the child direct the play. Have a few toys out to choose from and follow his or her lead.
  • Make simple remarks about what is going on, but avoid asking questions to probe for an answer: “What color is your truck? How about that car? What is this part of the car called?” This is play time, not teaching time.
  • Model out loud how to think about items: “You have a big, blue truck! Wow! Mine is small. I have a small, yellow truck. “
  • Model out loud how to problem-solve (over-and-over-and-over again): “Oops! The wheel came off my truck. Hmmm. How can I fix it? {looking over the whole truck while thinking….} If I get something to help the wheel stay on, I should be able to fix it. If I use glue, the wheel may not spin.”
  • Allow some “quiet” play time as well and let your child do the talking (or not if he so chooses). This is a great opportunity to just sit and listen to what your child is saying (to you and/or the toys).

I have parents send me some YouTube video of them performing some of these activities with their child. In subsequent sessions, we discuss what works well (and not so well) with the child, and I share more activity ideas and literature with them.

Tracy Sippl, MS, CCC-SLP, is a Seymour, Wisc.-based speech-language pathologist and tele-therapist with Cumberland Therapy Services. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 18, Telepractice. This post was adapted from a post on the Cumberland Therapy blog,  Right Therapy–Right Results–Right Now.

Planning a Play-Based Therapy Session

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The big laminate-top kidney tables that many of us have in our school-based “speech rooms” are a great place to run through flashcards, worksheets, read and map stories, answer questions, and teach brand new skills. However, unlike infant–toddler SLPs, for whom playing on the floor is standard, school-based SLPs often overlook opportunities for such play-based therapy.

With play-based therapy, you can really capture a child’s attention and make memories that will extend beyond the therapy session. These memorable moments support learning and retention, and are essential when treatment sessions are infrequent.

Play is flexible, non-literal, episodic and process-oriented. During play, the child is actively engaged and intrinsically motivated. True play has no extrinsic goals, but we sacrifice some of that to ensure that target skills are practiced. When designing play-based lessons, the less you deviate from true play, the better. Here’s how:

Required targets

The first step of planning a play-based therapy session is to select targets to teach. Next, you’ll identify a way to require those targets during play. Start with the lesson, not with the toy or game! You may think in terms of how to give access to something the child wants following skill demonstration. This “something” can be toys, food, parts of a whole (for example, puzzle piece, song phrase, portion of a motor sequence), social interaction, or a funny or amusing consequence. You’ll also have suggested targets that are encouraged but not required. This is because requiring target demonstration at too high a frequency quickly turns the play session into drill-based “work” and begins to peel away the benefits of playful learning.

Example: “Sleepy Sue,” target = /s/-initial words. Let the student choose dolls for each of you. Make your doll’s name “Sue.” Explain that Sue has a pesky tendency to fall asleep (*insert snoring*). When she dozes off, the child’s job is to wake her up by saying, “Sue! …Sue!” You assist with correct articulation, then commence with doll play until Sue falls asleep again. In a short period of play, the word “Sue” will be required many times, but you may also model things Sue and her dolly friends like to do, like sew, sing, or sit—targets that will be suggested but not required.

Memorable episode

The more episodic and story-like your play-based session is, the better. This is because associated events scaffold memories. Later that day, if a child can’t tell mom “what I did in speech today,” you aren’t reaping the benefit of repeated recall. Consider the “Sleepy Sue” example above—the more related the activities that Sue and her doll friends do, the better. It’s too easy to *think* you’re using playful learning, when in reality you’ve set up a nonassociative work–reward–work–reward structure (as with many games).

Memorable targets

In addition to the play episode being memorable, it’s perhaps even more important that the targets be memorable. I’ve used “Sleepy Sue” with a five-year-old who called me out the next session because I accidentally called Sue, “Sam.”And that was great! But a lot of kids wouldn’t remember that target, just like they won’t likely remember many of the target words in a series of flashcards. So I’ve also had “Sleepy Sue” do a cooking episode.

Example: “Sue Makes Soup,”target = /s/-initial words. Sue loves to cook, and the student can help Sue by choosing the ingredients for her soup. The child can add salsa, sausage, seeds, soy sauce, syrup, sour cream, and such. Of these targets, some can be the real thing! And how much fun is it to put real salt or real seeds in the soup bowl? “Salt” and “seeds” can be your required targets, and you hold the shakers until the student needs them. The student may even take some of the “targets” home to show dad. The other words may be required or suggested targets, depending on the student.

Play-based learning can be done with children of any age. What would play-based learning look like for a fifth grader? Start by considering how fifth graders play with one another (for example, talking about their favorite TV show), and design from there. Play-based learning is also excellent for students with autism—check out this article and this one. Whatever the child’s age or skills, always ask yourself—“Could we be playing with this?”


Meredith Poore Harold, PhD, CCC-SLP,
is a speech–language pathologist and independent scholar in Kansas City, Missouri. She works primarily with infant-toddler and elementary-aged children, and provides resources for parents and clinicians at www.meredithharold.com.

Snap and Post Photos of Your Day to the ASHA Leader Instagram Contest

instagram blog 2Say “cheese!” The new ASHA Leader is commemorating its inaugural year by celebrating YOU. We’re putting together a book of photographs that showcase what our members do best—helping people communicate. And we want your Instagram photos to be a part of it!

Ah, Instagram. I never go on a walk without my phone/camera, just in case a moment presents itself. There’s a walking loop near ASHA’s headquarters that’s about a mile long, and on nice days it’s a great way to blow off some steam, get some fresh air and remember there is a world outside your cubicle. But it’s also inhabited by trees, birds, flocks of geese, various corporate buildings and some shockingly obnoxious D.C. metro intersections, all of which make great fodder for Instagram.

Maybe you do it, maybe you don’t, but unless you’ve been living in a cave in the wilderness, you’ve undoubtedly heard about Instagram. It’s a photo app that allows users to filter, modify, and edit their photos any way the imagination allows. Many Instagrams start out looking like any digital photo, but end up looking like anything from quirky postcards to beautiful pieces of art. Check out the app and download it to your phone at Instagram.com. Then hop on over to Webstagram online to see millions of snapshots of life from around the globe. For Instagram examples from the Leader staff, go to Webstagram and look under the hashtag #ashaigers. Hey, sometimes your inner artist works, sometimes it doesn’t, but it’s always fun to try!

Because it’s so cool and we know you all have great stuff to share, we want to see your Instagrams. We know you work hard, have fun and blow off steam—show us! We want to see Instagram photos of your typical day as a speech-language pathologist, audiologist or researcher. How do you start your day? What moments during the work day or after hours are especially meaningful? Joyful? Or even particularly frustrating? Be creative and unique with your camera shots—capture the essence of your day and the landscape in which you live it (search the hashtag #ashaigers to see some staff examples).

The dates of the contest are May 12-18. The theme is “A Week in the Life of the Professions.” Upload your photos (put whatever filters or edits on them as you see fit) and be sure to include the hashtag #ashaigers in the caption.

Don’t have Instagram? E-mail your photos to leader@asha.org with the subject line “Instagram” and we’ll upload them for you.

After May 18, we (the Instagram-delirious Leader staff) will select the most memorable photos for inclusion in an orderable book. We’ll also feature as many of those selected as we can in our July issue! Everyone included in the book will receive credit and recognition; through a random drawing, 20 contributors will receive a free copy.

And we’re going to keep the photo fun going after May 18, selecting from photos you continue uploading to #ashaigers for a new recurring “Glimpses” feature in The ASHA Leader.  So c’mon folks! Grab your cameras, fancy-frame your subjects and settings, and get snapping and uploading! We want the book to be a memorable, lasting revelation of one week in the lives of speech-language pathologists, audiologists and speech-language scientists making a difference.

#ashaigers

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Gary Dunham, is editor-in-chief of The ASHA Leader and can be reached at gdunham@asha.org.

Tricks to Help Speech Lessons Carryover into Daily Life

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How can our clients better incorporate new skills into their speech in their daily lives? It seems that they are often limited by their social interactions with caregivers, parents or spouses, so that they can’t practice or complete speech homework between sessions.

Some of my adult clients will avoid practice sessions with their spouses altogether. How can we encourage use of newly acquired skills between visits? Wouldn’t the duration of therapy be reduced and functional communication improved? Research has supported more intensive therapy approaches to promote a more efficient, complete healing process. Because time and funding often limits therapy frequency, we send patients home with work for practice. Follow-through with homework generally rests on the motivation of the client or the client’s family. We need to find ways to make the therapy process efficient and functional.

In Pam Marshalla’s 2010 book “Carryover Techniques (in Articulation and Phonological Therapy),” she defines the term carryover are referring to “a client’s ability to take an individual speech skill learned in the therapy room and to apply it broadly in all speaking situations.”

Getting our students and clients to use their articulation and communication skills outside the therapy environment requires that we begin the process of carryover as soon as the skill is demonstrated in a variety of environments. For children, it might mean saying a fluent word or phrase during a game to get to the next square, or using the correct production of /r/ and /l/ during a short conversation about sports. For adults, the rules of learning after a stroke or traumatic brain injury still may require learning a new skill, like writing the first letter for phonemic placement or using cognitive-semantic linking to ask for coffee.

We need to get more creative to promote carryover across all our clients because of additional sensory, physical, psychological or cognitive difficulties that may impede the process. Charles Van Riper in 1947 wrote that while we cannot rush carryover, we must facilitate its progress.

Pam Marshalla listed some functional ways to promote carryover in children and adolescents, including use of:

  • Fill-in sentences or fill-in stories to stimulate spontaneity.
  • Idioms to stimulate spontaneity.
  • Negative practice to help break the incorrect speech habit.
  • Nonsense syllables and words to strengthen the carryover process.
  • Over practice to cause a hyper-awareness of the goals of therapy.
  • Rapid-fire questions and answers to promote naturalness.
  • Reading aloud as a step between word productions and conversational speech.
  • Rhyming to capture a client’s attention and encourage practice outside of therapy.
  • Riddles because they cause a client to combine practice material with creative thinking.
  • Shortening productions to encourage naturalness.
  • Singing to help children remember their speech work and to encourages effortless practice.
  • Spelling out errors to help the client think about what she is saying and how she is saying it.
  • Story-telling and re-telling to cause stimulate spontaneity and to cause a breakthrough in carryover.
  • Tongue twisters to teach children how to control their articulation.

More on promoting carryover in speech-language treatment can be found on Pam Marshalla’s website.

Many of these techniques are useful for adults as well as children. Here are some additional carryover ideas for adults:

  • Create a script to practice at a favorite restaurant.
  • Use the carryover phrases and substitute other items at a counter deli or a department store.
  • Make a to-do list (or grocery list) each day. Practice writing and reading.
  • Talk about the programs you will watch.
  • Use carryover phrases for conversation, such as, “Hi. How are______?” “What is____?”  “I’m _____.” “Who is____?”
  • Use a calendar and an 8 by 10 dry-erase board to practice drawing,writing and gesturing.
  • Use your smart pad, apps, whiteboard, AAC, text-to-speech, and speech-to-text to send emails and do alphabet board, speech tutor and naming practice.
  • Play your favorite brain games daily. They will help you with focus, learning, word-finding and memory.

If you encourage your clients to engage in games and functional activities daily, the overall quality of your clients’ understanding and speech production will improve because you are encouraging the growth of new neural connections. Your clients are naturally acquiring and using the new skills in their daily lives because they are using them. Becoming more functional can be the most motivating effect of carryover.

 

Betsy C. Schreiber, MMS, CCC-SLP, is a clinical supervisor at Ladge Speech and Hearing Clinic at LIU/Post on Long Island, and a partner at Hope 4 Speech Associates, P.C. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Groups 2, Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, and 18, Telepractice.

 

Helping Clients With Aphasia Retrieve Words—On Their Own

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Eric Broder Van Dyke / Shutterstock.com

“I can’t hear it!” This was said by Mrs. A, a 67-year-old woman with aphasia, who actually hears fine. What she meant to say is that she can’t recall the sequence of sounds to express a particular word or idea. When we have that tip-of-the-tongue loss of a name, how do we try to remember it? What strategies are we using to get to that word that we can’t remember?

Our success depends on our ability to hunt and gather—and on the number of neural connections we can tap into to access the information. These skills are cognitive, not simply learned operantly.

In my last blog post, I talked about establishing cueing hierarchies and functional activities for our adult clients. This post looks at using the cueing hierarchy to stimulate the rewiring process. Sometimes I think that I am a sort of electrician rather than an SLP. I work on finding the connections based on observed behavior from evaluations or activities (like writing, gesturing or drawing) that require least intervention.

How do we develop these skills? How can we teach strategies for short and long-term functional success?

Sometimes, we spend the therapy session working on the most disabled aspects of the communication disorder: comprehension, word retrieval, writing and reading. But if we don’t tap clients’ best abilities to foster some success, and if we don’t address whether they are continuing to practice these skills outside the therapy room, how will compensatory skills, adaptive skills and new connections work for them?

Let’s look at Mrs. A, who said, “I can’t hear it.” She was telling me about the very connection that she lacks due to her aphasia: re-auditorization. She can’t hear the words or the phonemes that make up the words in what I call “her mind’s ear.” If given the first phoneme, or a carrier phrase, she almost always names the word. She is able to write the word about 75 percent of the time but can only read it aloud about 30 percent of the time. She will often be able to speak complex multisyllabic words or a short phrase when discussing a topic. Auditory and reading comprehension is 75 percent for paragraphs. She is very intact cognitively, but her affect varies emotionally from congenially engaged to depressed and angry.

She is about two years post-stroke and has an all-in-one AAC that she doesn’t use. Our goals must address her frustration by establishing immediate successful compensatory strategies for communication. Then we need to build skills that will help in the rewiring, so that she begins to cue herself. The rewiring will be difficult here because she doesn’t link the phoneme to the letters she is able to write. But if she can write the word and then read it aloud more often, she can develop a clear strategy for verbalization that will reduce her frustration.

We will begin by simply reviewing phonetic placement in monosyllabic words. I like to use real words—which have semantic value—rather than nonsense syllables. Consonant-vowels alone don’t work as well as consonant-vowel-consonants that mean something. Mrs. A started relearning that a /b/ means that the lips come together when starting a whole word like “beer.” We chose beer for the visceral, emotional connection it has for many people. We talked about when she might drink beer, such as at a baseball game, which lends itself to picture assistance to boost cognitive links. We initially used a mirror to model the placement while sitting next to her. We highlighted the first letter and said it with her. She saw the picture, then wrote the word.

Mrs. A can now produce the whole word “beer” after seeing a picture of it. Looking at the Cueing Hierarchy, we have moved from most clinician involvement to independent self-cueing for this phoneme. She is moving on to more phonemes rapidly so that we may not need to review every letter after a period of time. Mrs. A. is beginning to generalize the link to other sounds. New neuro-behavioral links and relinks are helping her associate the orthographic letter with a physical movement and the sound that is produced. New cognitive links and self-cueing has begun!

Next, she will need to use the strategy in controlled conversation and small groups to increase her comfort level and functional use outside of treatment. This is a big hurdle. Families and caregivers are crucial players and need to be instructed how to encourage communication without frustration. When possible, teach the caregivers and families how the strategy works. They will use it more readily at home and will see how it can work in a variety of situations, such as in restaurants.

Another client, Mrs. C, had a similar functional ability to write but not verbalize. With time, she was able to trace the first letter in the air to cue herself to say a word.

In both cases, skills that had been present were improved, then used to create a compensatory strategy for functional communication. We must teach our clients strategies for improving the scope of their communication without our cues, using their own strategies, thereby making them more independently functional. While available strategies are unique to each client, they usually take the form of low tech gesturing, drawing, writing, even circumlocution.

We want our clients to be learning and improving communication dynamically. If we always fill in all of the sentences or speak for them, they cannot make their own connections. When allowed to use strategies independently, they then blossom, not only communicatively but socially.

Betsy C. Schreiber, MMS, CCC-SLP, is a clinical supervisor at Ladge Speech and Hearing Clinic at LIU/Post on Long Island, and a partner at Hope 4 Speech Associates, P.C. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Groups 2, Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, and 18, Telepractice.

Speech Therapy and Aging: Brain Plasticity and Cueing Hierarchies

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Given our knowledge of the plasticity of the brain, are we as clinicians or caregivers, able to help to develop new links with a behavioral model, by using gradated cueing hierarchies?  Could this low-tech and pharmaceutical-free form of treatment  have neurologically based implications for rehabilitation and adaptation in communicatively challenging settings?

Perhaps more testing with fMRI scans may be necessary to really prove the theory. Therapy approaches using cueing models have been well documented in the literature in speech therapy treatment for aphasia.  However, the way we use clinician originated cues can help create new links and expedite a broad area of cognitive and linguistic improvement, or maintain the functional status quo, unless we analyze the kinds of cues we are using and the amount of independence we are carefully eliciting from the client.

By looking at each task and cue needed on a continuum from simple to complex, concrete to abstract, you can construct a grid of where on the continuum the client functions and how you can provide a cue or help them provide their own cues for success.

The idea that the damaged axons and dendrites in the brain are looking for connections and stay active when the brain is activated, prompted me to want to create a cueing continuum (see http://carmichaellab.neurology.ucla.edu/integrated-view-neural-repair-after-stroke.) On the theory that the client can develop new pathways , if we always fill in the missing word or provide the first phoneme, then the client will never have to learn where to get it, via their own written word, for example.  But how do we get from writing the word for the client to having the client write the word in the air and say it? It all depends on the residual abilities, but the concept can be applied to everyone.

We have a 60 year old gentleman with TBI who is learning how to semantically cue himself to find a word. Initially, he had severe speech and cognitive impairments. Now, in conversation, he often uses circumlocution to get his point across. However, sometimes specific words are warranted, and this is difficult for him. He can sometimes spell the word aloud even though he cannot speak it. We had him do this several times with great success. Our next task was to remind him that he could do this to help himself.  Later we only asked him what he would like to do.  We are helping him build those dendritic links ( and learn to use a skill) by carefully reducing the amount of clinician prompting or cueing during the sessions and writing down the strategies for him to practice at home. Although there are many approaches to cueing, none of them seem to describe cueing in a continuum from most invasive to most independent. Many clinicians describe the cues as semantic or phonemic.  I found that there were nuances in cueing that I had learned over the years to allow the client to gradually become independent. When I had difficulty transmitting these ideas to my students, I created a loose continuum to mark where our clients fell given specific objectives, and how we could get their neurons to get closer together behaviorally if not actually by breaking the cues down.

Along with the goals we establish for our clients, no matter their abilities, we must always be evaluating their behavior and trying new materials and varied activities to facilitate language.

As we converse with others, we derive cues from the environment and from the people with whom we are speaking (that is part of the reason why conversation amongst the adult neurologically language-impaired looks better than when we test them by looking for specific words and longer utterances).

Our goal with cueing is to develop self-cues and elicit more language. A self-cue can be as basic as a gesture or a drawing, but if the client is doing it and communicating to me what he did for the weekend, then he has been successful. Often when the stress is lower or the focus is away from speaking, the words and incidental phrases flow more freely. The best reward is to see the expression on our client’s face when he says a few words effortlessly because he was engaged in the activity. But this is not we what we are trying to do. We are trying to give him real tools for those times he cannot utter a word.

When the client leaves the therapy room, we want him or her to be able to use their own skills, rather than rely on others. Since they may not be able to develop their own means of self-cueing, we include self-cue skill development as part of the therapy plan.  The client may or may not have the ability to provide his or her own cues, yet. But throughout the therapy and rehabilitation process, we work toward the skills of self-cuing no matter the level, such as writing, gesturing, drawing pictures, and talking about the item or activity with words that are available.

The Cueing Hierarchy Continuum is by no means linear, but will generally go from simple and most dependent to complex and independent. They follow the behavioral branches that may be used in clinic therapy logs. They are separated on my behavior grid in 3 categories: Clinician Assisted Cues, Clinician prompting (or reminding the client to use a strategy) and Self Correcting. This approach requires that the client learn about his strengths and how to implement them to improve what we would consider weaknesses. By identifying which cues are more dependent, we can be cognizant of allowing the client to work at a documented realistic level achieve the objective.

It is well documented that there is enough plasticity in almost any brain to stimulate, heal and renew brain function after a stroke or TBI. For cognitive loss during normal aging, the dementias and the progressive dementias, there is less clear documentation for which approaches are the most effective and pragmatic for our clients. However, similar principles can be used to establish functional objectives along with the family and caregivers.

How to develop skills? How to develop strategies for short and long-term functional success?  Sometimes, we spend the therapy session working on comprehension, word finding, writing and reading using a variety of materials.  But, if we don’t address what they are learning outside the therapy room, which they may visit one or two times a week, how will compensatory skills, adaptive skills and  new connections be utilized?   That will be the topic for next month’s post.

Betsy C. Schreiber, MMS, CCC-SLP, received a BA in Psychology and MMS Master of Medical Science in Speech Pathology from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. Her CCC was earned during the 3 years she worked at Hitchcock Rehabilitation Center in Aiken, South Carolina where she had the opportunity to learn about NDT and Sensory Integration with the original, Jane Ayres, working with LD and CP children and neurologically impaired adults. She is currently a clinical supervisor at Ladge Speech and Hearing Clinic at LIU/Post on Long Island, and a partner at Hope 4 Speech Associates, P.C. She has also served as an ASHA Mentor and hopes to participate in ASHA’s  Political Action Committee in the coming year. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Groups 2, Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, and 18, Telepractice.

Winter Literacy

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I love following bloggers and using their lesson plans that are paired with children’s books!  They have inspired me to create some of my own plans for my elementary aged clients.  Over the winter break, I pulled out some of my seasonal books and created simple, functional lessons to pair with the stories.  I also purchased and printed some great winter literacy plans from a couple other sites.

The first book, Tracks in the Snow by Wong Herbert Yee, is a nice read for my 1st and 2nd grade clients.  This year, much of my caseload is working on irregular past tense verbs, so I decided to use this short and sweet winter story to target verbs.  I decided to create a list using sentences with present tense verbs from the story.  Children will take turns changing the target verb into the past tense and earn an animal track card or tokens for correct responses.  The person with the most tracks or tokens wins! You can grab your list here for Tracks in the Snow.

My next book, The Missing Mitten Mystery by Steven Kellogg is a funny story about a little girl who retraces her steps outside in search of a missing mitten.  I found this book by Scholastic for a quarter at my local library sale!  I needed a lesson for some 3rd graders that focused on simple comprehension questions following a short reading and this book fit the bill!  If you can find this book at your local library or bookstore, then you can use these comprehension questions!

Another score at the library sale was, In the Snow: Who’s Been Here? by Lindsay Barrett George.  I highly recommend borrowing or purchasing this book because each page gives clues about a winter animal that has crossed the trail in the woods just prior to the children’s walk.  Great for vocabulary building and answering who/what questions!!

If you have not seen the FREE templates at www.makelearningfun.com that go along with the stories, The Mitten and The Hat both by Jan Brett, then you should follow this link to take a look!

Finally, I recently found some great worksheets for the award winning story,Owl Moon by Jane Yolen at this blogger’s TpT site.

I hope that you have found these resources to be helpful!  If you have, then please take a moment to follow [my] blog and/or like my Facebook page, speech2me.  I would LOVE to hear about some of your favorite winter literacy units, so feel free to comment below!  Happy New Year!!

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This post originally appeared on The Next Chapter in my Speech World.

Nanette Cote, MA, CCC-SLP works contractually for Staffing Options and Solutions and has her own practice, Naperville Therapediatrics.  She is a pediatric Speech-Language Pathologist in Naperville, Illinois who was recently certified in Interactive Metronome Therapy.   Her blog, speech2me, was named one of the top Speech-Language blogs for 2012.  For more information about this practitioner, please visit the blog at www.speech2me.blogspot.com or the Facebook page.

Therapy Fun with Ready Made Fall and Halloween Bingo

 

There are many fun therapy activities you can do with your preschool and school aged clients in the fall. One of my personal favorites is bingo. Boggles World, an online ESL teacher resource actually has a number of ready made materials, flashcards, and worksheets which can be adapted for speech language therapy purposes. For example, their Fall and Halloween Bingo comes with both call out cards and a 3×3 and a 4×4 (as well as 3×3) card generator/boards. Clicking the refresh button will generate as many cards as you need, so the supply is endless! You can copy and paste the entire bingo board into a word document resize it and then print it out on reinforced paper or just laminate it.

Fall vocabulary words include: corn, crops, farmer, scarecrow, apples, acorns, oak leaf, maple leaves, ginkgo leaves, grapes, mushrooms, salmon, geese, squirrel, jacket, turkey, Jack-O’-Lantern, rake, pumpkins, harvest moon, hay, chestnuts, crow, and sparrow

Halloween vocabulary words include: witch, ghost, skeleton, skull, spider, owl, Jack-O’-Lantern, devil, cobweb, graveyard, clown, pirate, robot, superhero, mummy, vampire, bat, black cat, trick or treaters, alien, werewolf

Now the fun begins!

Some suggested activities:

Phonological Awareness:

  • Practice Rhyming words (you can do discrimination and production activities): cat/bat/ trick/leaf/ rake/moon
  • Practice Syllable and Phoneme Segmentation  (I am going to say a word (e.g., ghost, spider, alien, etc) and I want you to clap one time for each syllable or sound I say)
  • Practice Isolation of initial, medial, and final phonemes in words ( e.g., What is the beginning/final  sound in mummy, vampire, robot, etc?) What is the middle sound in bat/cat/geese/rake etc?
  • Practice Initial and Final Syllable and Phoneme Deletion in Words  (Say spider! Now say it without the der, what do you have left? Say trick, now say it without the /t/ what is left; say corn, now say it without the /n/, what is left?)

Articulation/Fluency:

  • Practice production of select sounds/consonant clusters that you are working on or just production at word or sentence levels with those clients who just need a little bit more work in therapy increasing their intelligibility or sentence fluency.

Language:

  • Practice Categorization skills via convergent and divergent naming activities: Name Fall words, Name Halloween Words, How many trees  whose leaves change color can you name?, how many vegetables and fruits do we harvest in the fall? etc.
  • Practice naming Associations: what goes with a witch (broom), what goes with a squirrel (acorn), etc.
  • Practice providing Attributes via naming category, function, location, parts, size, shape, color, composition, as well as accessory/necessity.  For example, (I see a pumpkin. It’s a fruit/vegetable that you can plant, grow and eat. You find it on a farm. It’s round and orange and is the size of a ball. Inside the pumpkin are seeds. You can carve it and make a jack o lantern out of it).
  • Practice providing Definitions: Tell me what a skeleton is. Tell me what a scarecrow is.
  • Practice naming Similarities and Differences among semantically related items: How are pumpkin and apple alike? How are they different?
  • Practice explaining Multiple Meaning words:   What are some meanings of the word bat, witch, clown, etc?
  • Practice Complex Sentence Formulation: make up a sentence with the words crops and unless, make up a sentence with the words skeleton and however, etc.
  • Or you can just make up your own receptive, expressive and social  pragmatic language activities to go along with these games.

So join in the fun and start playing!

(This post originally appeared on the Smart Speech Therapy LLC blog)

 

Tatyana Elleseff MA CCC-SLP, is a bilingual speech language pathologist with a full-time hospital affiliation (UMDNJ) and a private practice (Smart Speech Therapy LLC) in Central, NJ. She received her MA from NYU and her Bilingual Extension Certification from Columbia University. She specializes in working with bilingual, multicultural, internationally and domestically adopted at risk children with complex medical, developmental, neurogenic, psychogenic, and acquired communication disorders.

Making the Most of Summer Fun: Language-Based Activities for Children & Their Families

With summer just around the corner, many parents and teachers are already making plans for summer fun. Do you need ideas for speech-language activities during the summer break? Read on!  Here are my top suggestions for fun, language-based activities that target communication skills in memorable ways.

Take a walk – A walk that incorporates language skills can be as simple as a stroll around the block, or as complex as an afternoon hike to a scenic destination. As you walk, encourage conversation by asking open-ended questions or observations like, “I wonder what this is!”  Take note (out loud) of things that you see, hear, discover and enjoy, encouraging your child to do the same. You could also create a game or scavenger hunt for your walk, prompting your child to search for and label objects using a picture checklist:

Plan Day Trips – Take trips to local beaches, parks, museums or amusement parks. These excursions are not only fun, but they give your child the gift of developing background knowledge, or schema – an important database of personal experiences that become essential for reading comprehension. Providing your child with a variety of life experiences gives them a broader vocabulary base and fosters personal connections to text and stories. These connections will prepare children for higher level skills as they are introduced to new reading material and participate in group discussions. Day trips are also good practice for language formulation, planning and organization skills, and they offer many opportunities to reinforce conversational behaviors, language use and comprehension. Here are some select visuals that target these skills:

Take a Road Trip – If you are planning a vacation this summer, take advantage of the many built-in opportunities to develop communication skills. Trapped in the car for hours? Resist the urge to “autoplay” your ride with DVDs or handheld electronic devices. Why not target speech-language skills with games that kids love and will very likely remember for years? “I Spy,” license plate games or find-the-alphabet contests all target verbal skills and a variety of language concepts. You could also create a Seek-and-Find activity for your trip, like this downloadable version:

 Make a Treat – What activity is more rewarding than one that ends in a fun treat to eat? Simple recipes can target a variety of language skills and are a favorite with kids. Practice following directions, using descriptive concepts, sequential vocabulary and more with real tools and materials.  Here is a super easy treat I’ve made with my own children and students, with visual directions that allow for review after you are done:Go to the Movies – ‘The movies’ are not exactly the first thing that comes to mind when one thinks about fostering communication skills. How can sitting passively in a dark theater target speech-language goals? But let’s face it – many parents can become desperate to find an enjoyable activity for the kids on those stifling hot, lazy days of summer. Enjoying an air-conditioned theater for a two hour respite can be just what you and your child need. (For children with sensory issues that make trips to movie theaters a challenge, look for sensory-friendly movie times, like those offered in AMC theaters.) In addition to creating motivating content for future discussions and activities, movies also generate opportunities for language before and after your excursion. Decide with your child what you will seewhere and when you will see it. After the show, review with your child the movie plot, characters and sequential events. Ask questions like, “What was your favorite part? Why?” to help your child formulate and support their opinions. Offer your own opinion, too! Encourage critical thinking skills by asking “why”  “how” and “what if” questions. Some families I know even keep a log of movies they see throughout the year, giving each movie a rating after a family movie discussion.

Schedule Playdates – Effective speech-language therapy often includes group sessions to promote socials skills and to create opportunities that reinforce generalization of skills. Foster peer interaction, interactive play, functional communication and other skills by arranging a short playdate. Around two hours is a good length of time for a get-together, allowing ample opportunities for play, exploration and a small snack. Offer a few summer activities (bubbles, balls, sand toys, etc) and encourage conversation/interaction, but do resist the urge to organize their activities. Children need time to develop play with each other and discover what is motivating or fun in the moment.

Read, Read, Read – Reading with your child is one of the best activities you can do to promote language and literacy skills. Studies show that time spent reading with your child is the best predictor of overall academic success. The AmericanAssociation of School Librarians reported a study, (Wells, 1988) where researchers found that “the amount of experience that five-year-old children had with books was directly related to their reading comprehension at seven and eleven years old. Wells stated that of all the activities considered possibly helpful for the acquisition of literacy, only one—listening to stories—was significantly associated with later test scores.” Read more.

Not sure how to incorporate language into reading? The U.S. Department of Education outlines things you can do to help your child develop language and literacy skills. Read more.

Whatever your plans this summer, do take time to engage with your child in real ways using everyday activities. For more ideas/activities that target communication skills, please visit my speech-language blog at LiveSpeakLove.

(This post originally appeared on LiveSpeakLove)

 

Lisa Geary, MS,CCC-SLP, is an SLP working in the Baltimore County Public Schools in Baltimore, MD. She also recently establishing her own private practice to supplement her school-based position. Lisa enjoys a diverse student caseload, servicing preschool and elementary school students in general and special education settings. Lisa especially enjoys working with students on the Autism spectrum and with students using low-tech communication supports and/or AAC/AT devices. With personal interests in the application of technology and in the creation of speech-language resources, Lisa maintains a blog highlighting these efforts.

Spring Flowers: An Arts and Crafts Activity for Toddlers and Preschoolers

Spring has sprung! And, so have many beautiful flowers. Here’s an easy but fun arts and crafts activity to facilitate your child’s speech and language. I have included some tips and strategies to help stimulate vocabulary development.

Coloring Flowers with Bingo Markers

Materials:

Bingo markers

Regular markers

Paper

Procedure:

Draw a flower. Include its pedals, stem, and leaves. Keep it simple and make the parts easy to identify. This is especially good for children who need help in identifying parts from a whole. As you are drawing the flower, narrate what you are drawing (TIP # 1). For instance, “I’m drawing a flower. Now, I’m drawing the leaves…the pedals…stems….etc.” This may seem obvious, but it’s amazing at how quiet some parents are when they are playing with their children. If you’re expecting a child to verbally communicate, it’s important to use language during these intimate experiences because it teaches them that communicating is fun and exciting! Be animated and add inflection to your voice (TIP #2) – especially when introducing new vocabulary. For instance, if you are drawing the stem, stress the new word to alert your child’s attention to it (e.g. “I’m drawing the stem”. Repetition is also important. Children need multiple repetitions (TIP #3) and various contexts (TIP #4) to fully understand the meaning of a new word. Enriching, hands-on experiences and multiple yet different interactions really help the child to fully understand. I’m not a huge fan of using flashcards for younger children, like toddlers, because they are one-dimensional and can be easily misunderstood. So, repeat new vocabulary many times during the activity (“I drew the stem.” “The stem is green”. “The stem is long.”). Then, after the activity, take the child on a stroll through your backyard or neighborhood and point out flowers and name their various parts. Lastly, avoid asking the child too many test-like questions (TIP #5) – “What’s this?” or “What’s that?” Children are usually pretty aware that you are “testing” them and it takes the joy out of learning new things.  Once you have drawn a flower (or two or three or more flowers) let the child “color” them with the bingo markers! It can look something like this:

Some Possible Target Words:

 

Summary of Tips:

1: Narrate your actions (Feel free to narrate your child’s actions too!)

2. Be animated and add inflection to your voice

3. Provide multiple repetitions

4. Expose the new word in various settings and contexts (see extension activities for examples)

5. Avoid asking too many “test-like questions”. Two words: NOT FUN!

Extension Activities:

Go on a nature walk

Arrange some flowers in a vase

Plant a flower in the yard or grow some seeds in a styrofoam cup

Kimberly Scanlon, M.A. CCC-SLP, is a speech language pathologist practicing in Bergen County, NJ. She provides home based speech therapy for children and adults through her private practice Scanlon Speech Therapy, LLC.  To learn more about Kimberly visit www.scanlonspeech.com.