How One Bold Adventurer Survived the Opening of Exhibit Hall at Convention (We Think)

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At approximately 8:35 pm on the evening of Thursday, November 14, a sheath of papers and an undeveloped roll of film were recovered by a custodian working in the Posters section of the Exhibit Hall at McCormick Place in Chicago. Tucked snugly under a (still warm) seat cushion, the yellowed, tattered handwritten manuscript and frayed […]

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Tips for Assessing Bilingual Children As a Monolingual SLP

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Even bilingual speech-language pathologists will encounter situations in which the client’s primary language is unknown. There are standardized, evidence-based tests for the Spanish-English population. But what about Russian, Vietnamese, German and so on? What do you do?

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Collaboration Corner: Supervision 101

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  As a school-based clinician in the Boston area, I’m grateful to have access to some of the greatest learning institutions in the country. As an off-site clinical supervisor, I feel particularly obligated to make all that learning translate into something meaningful. In a public school placement, the school day can become insanely busy. This […]

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Audiologists: As Hearing Aid Competition Stiffens, Show How Your Services Add Value

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Audiologists, of course, know that their health care training is necessary for proper selection and fitting of hearing aids. But the value-added of an audiologist’s services is often unrealized by consumers. Thus, said Abrams, as distribution channels expand, the key is to demonstrate that the audiologist channel is the quality channel because it’s centered on the patient and focused on positive outcomes.

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Kid Confidential: Tips for Working with Students with Hearing Impairment in the Schools

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This month I revisited the topic of classroom difficulties and possible accommodations and modifications for students with hearing loss in the School Matters column of the ASHA Leader.  As there is so much to discuss on this topic, I was unable to share some of the inside tips I have learned when working with students […]

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Don’t Beat Yourself Up—Your Client’s Behavior is Not Your Behavior

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What were people talking about—about this not being emotionally involved? Well, over the years I have come to understand what this means, and I have tried to pass this information along to the clinical fellows and externs I supervise. To me, it is about not having your ego caught up in the clients’ performance, but to have it grounded in your own performance.

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Planning for Holiday Meals with a Picky Eater

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  As an SLP  focused on the treatment of pediatric feeding disorders,  there is one common denominator among all the families on my caseload:  The stress in their homes at mealtimes is palpable.   Now that Thanksgiving and other food-centered holidays are approaching,  the anticipation of an entire day focused on food has many parents agonizing […]

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Coaching Parents to Foster Their Child’s Expressive Language Skills

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I provided the boy’s parents with information about expressive language development and explained that their expectations appeared to be beyond this child’s current capabilities (determined by the boy’s age, as well as his disability). Next I took the language and vocabulary skills the parents wanted their son to learn—such as labeling an apple—and broke them out into smaller steps that would help the child grasp the concept:

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How to Use The Language of Baking

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Do you want to spice up your therapy sessions? Try this no fail recipe for pumpkin brownies. They are moist, full of chocolate flavor and absolutely delicious. You will not miss the additional oil or eggs in this recipe. There are only two ingredients, which make it easy to make and fit into a therapy […]

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When Is Treatment for Stuttering ‘Completed’?

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Both parents and speech therapists alike find themselves struggling to decide when treatment is complete for someone who stutters. Therapy for a child who has difficulty saying their “r”s has a distinct beginning and end (when a child meets criterion for 90 percent accuracy in conversation), however, stuttering is much more variable, by nature. In fact, once a child reaches the age of 8, it is much more likely that their stuttering is going to persist, in some form.

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