NIMTR: Not In My Treatment Room!

poison

You’ve heard of NIMBY, “not-in-my-backyard” haven’t you?  Well there’s a new acronym, NIMTR or “not-in-my-therapy-treatment-room!”  Speech-language pathologists are inundated by catalogs filled with wonderful colorful, fragrant, pliable toys as treatment materials.  We use these every day with our students, our clients in clinics, our bedside patients.  But how much do we really know about the […]

Continue reading...

Step Away From the Sippy Cup!

sippy

Sippy Cups became all the rage in the 1980s, along with oversized shoulder pads, MC Hammer parachute pants and bangs that stood up like a water spout on top of your head.   A mechanical engineer, tired of his toddler’s trail of juice throughout the house, set out to create a spill-proof cup that would “outsmart […]

Continue reading...

How 2013 Taught Me To Be a Better SLP

2013

We have successfully completed another year owning a private practice in a location that is densely populated with speech language pathologists. And by “we” I mean myself and my husband. We are implementing a business plan that he poured sweat and tears over (everything just short of the blood…) and the doors to our business […]

Continue reading...

Continuing Education: The Options; The Reality

conted

Kids, my own or those I work with, are often slightly astonished that I like school—genuinely like school.  They can’t believe I willingly went to school beyond college and even now happily sign up for multi-day seminars. Apart from the fact that it’s required for us to maintain our certification (30 hrs or 3.0 CEUs/3-year […]

Continue reading...

Aphasia: How a Video IS Worth a Thousand Words

words

  I have been a practicing speech-language pathologist for the past 40 years. My last position prior to my retirement in September of this year was as an out-patient SLP at Virginia Commonwealth University Health System (VCUHS) rehab clinic working primarily with stroke and head injury patients. Ours is a rewarding profession but during the […]

Continue reading...

Collaboration Corner: “Out of my Mind” Speaks Volumes

When-I-was-the-speaker

This year, I worked with a fifth grade class who was reading “Out of my Mind” by Sharon Draper. The story is about a nonspeaking 11- year-old girl with cerebral palsy. Her classmates, teachers, and even  her doctors underestimate her abilities. Little do they know she has a photographic memory. One day after months of fighting […]

Continue reading...

How to Provide Bilingual Services (Even When You’re Monolingual)

vogl

Evaluation is one huge hurdle to working with English Language Learners (ELL). The second is providing therapy. Once you’ve determined there is a disorder, what do you do? Do you provide treatment in English? What goals do you target? Can you provide competent treatment in English only? It may be easier to address some of […]

Continue reading...

How to Navigate the Profession One Binder at a Time

binder1

  My entire professional career can be summarized by what binder I was holding, and where I was while holding it. I waltzed into my interview for graduate school with a small binder, and a ton of nerves; I entered the current school I’m working in (my first job, ever!) holding my giant binder containing […]

Continue reading...

Kid Confidential: Using Thematic Instruction in Speech Therapy

pirate

I have seen many speech and language activities labeled as “themed” therapy activities just by the mere coincidence that they may sport graphics or clip art associated with a particular theme or holiday.  However, simply pasting an associated picture on a stimulus card while asking a student to perform a generic speech or language task […]

Continue reading...

Remembering Sandy Hook: How to Live Like a First Grader

sandyhook

As a speech-language pathologist who works with young children in their homes and schools, it’s impossible for me not think of the heartbreak at Sandy Hook Elementary School this time of year. Shortly after the tragedy in 2012, I made a list of some simple things I can do to honor those precious lives taken […]

Continue reading...