Learning About New Foods Without Eating: 5 Surprising Tips for Parents

new food

Wait … isn’t the idea to get the kid to eat Brussels sprouts?  Yes, ultimately.  But exploring food with all of our senses is often the first step to eventually, tasting new foods.  Whether your child is in feeding therapy or you’re just trying to raise a more adventurous eater, here are 5 strategies for encouraging kids to discover various sensory aspects of new foods before they muster the courage to take that very  first taste:

  1. Still Got Easter Eggs?  The plastic ones, that is.    Take the 2 halves and line an egg carton with red, yellow, green and/or orange eggs.  Cut up fruits and vegetables into dime-sized pieces and practice matching colors.  Each time your child picks up the new food, tell him “Red tomato with Red Egg!” and help him find the red egg so he can drop in the tomato.  Now you have a kiddo who is picking up all kinds of fruits and veggies, even the slightly wet, cut-up pieces, which many kids hesitate to touch.
  2. Pop in a DVDCopy-Kids created a DVD of adorable kids eating fruits and vegetables, “because children learn best from other children.”  Sit down and watch it with your child, along with a colorful snack tray of bell peppers, broccoli, avocado, blueberries…you get the idea.  Keep it positive and don’t emphasize the eating part.  Just pick up the same food you see on the TV and say something silly about it.  Roll it down your cheeks and talk about how it feels.  Give it a big kiss and proclaim your love for orange, red, yellow and green peppers!  It’s not always about biting into a new food – that comes later.  But, if taking a bite happens in the course of playing and watching a silly DVD, then that’s terrific!
  3. Create Your Own Food Network Show with your kid as the host!  If the best he can do is direct the show behind the camera while you cook, that’s still a great start.  At least he’s in the kitchen, interacting with the food (albeit from a distance)  in a positive, fun way.  Later that evening, invite the whole family to watch his creation together and serve the food you made on film.  Soon, he’ll be hosting the show and cooking new dishes while you operate the camera.
  4. Watch More TV.  Before you think I’m obsessed with television, let me share 2 terrific resources that will help your kids explore new cuisine.  The Good Food Factory is the Emmy award-winning kids’ cooking show televised in California.  But, you can still watch vintage episodes as well as 2 newer episodes on line.   Or, check out the tiny tasters on the Doctor Yum videos.  Created by a pediatrician, the website includes lots of how-to videos featuring kids doing the cooking.  Using videos to introduce the joy of food to your kids is just that – an introduction.  Afterward,  head to the grocery store.  Pick out that new produce you saw on a Doctor Yum video – like a prickly pear or a lychee or a dragon fruit.  Cut it open…take a lick…one thing might just lead to another!
  5. Make Handprint Pictures Using Purees.  First, include your child in the process of making the edible “paint” puree.  Anything will do: yogurt, pudding or even cauliflower blended to a smooth paste.  Add a touch of color to the cauliflower by using natural food dyes or blending in real food, such as carrot juice or spinach leaves, letting your child pick up the spinach and add it through the safety top of the blender.  Spread the puree onto a cookie sheet or flat plate.  For the child who is tactilely defensive, you may notice that he will touch the puree with either just the side of his thumb or the tip of one finger.  That’s a fine place to start!  Over time, he’ll progress to tolerating his entire hand flattened into the plate of puree and then, pressing  his messy little hand onto paper to make a handprint.  For ideas on various animals you can create with hand or even footprints, click here.

Egg Carton Color Matching

What do all of these strategies have in common?  They’re fun and they involve YOU – the most important person in your child’s life!  Be silly, be positive and join in!  Get your hands messy,  model healthy eating and praise what your kiddo can do on that day.  Learning to try new foods involves all of our senses and remember,  tasting  often takes time.

 

Melanie Potock, MA, CCC-SLP, treats children birth to teens who have difficulty eating.  She is the author of Happy Mealtimes with Happy Kids and the producer of the award-winning kids’ CD Dancing in the Kitchen: Songs that Celebrate the Joy of Food!  Melanie’s two-day course on pediatric feeding is  offered for ASHA CEUs and includes both her book and CD for each attendee.  She can be reached at Melanie@mymunchbug.com.

Dynamic Assessment: How Does it Work in the Real World of Preschool Evaluations?

dynamic evaluation

 

In a disability evaluation, we ask a child to point “to the triangle” or “to the author” as part of test developed to identify disorder.  An evaluator who uses this kind of test to identify disability must assume that all children being evaluated have had similar exposure to “triangle” and “author” including similar family, cultural, and educational experiences. It follows then, that if a child cannot identify “triangle” or “author” it is because that child has some kind of learning problem. But what if a child does not have a disability but simply did not have the same exposure to “triangle” or books as the majority of children his age? Dynamic assessment offers evaluators an approach to see whether a child can acquire new linguistic information from the environment. Here are some clinicians examples of how to translate the dynamic assessment research into their own disability evaluations, including some “dynamic” approaches to increase the accuracy of our preschool disability evaluations.

First, Let us consider nonword repetition tasks, one type of dynamic assessment. Nonword repetition tasks assess whether a child can hear, retain briefly, and then repeat nonsense syllables of varying lengths. Nonword repetition tasks give us insight into why a child may have a weak vocabulary. If the child has difficulty with nonword repetition tasks it may indicate a disordered ability to learn new words from the environment and will also affect the child’s ability to understand directors and spoken stories. Here are two modules analyzing videos of several children, both with and without language impairments, doing the same nonword repetition task. By seeing how different children of different abilities perform as they acquire the new words, clinicians acquire clinical judgment. Nonword repetition tasks are not classic dynamic assessment because there is no pre and post-test. But because we watch the child learning new syllables in front of us, it is dynamic rather than static.

Another dynamic approach is fast word mapping. In fast word mapping we evaluate whether a child can learn new words. Because the words are completely made up, no child has more or less experience with these words. In these videos of 4-year-olds, one child is typically developing, one child has low average to mildly delayed skills, and one child has mild to moderate delays. What is especially helpful with more dynamic approaches to assessment, we see a much greater range of information about a child’s skills, rather than simply did he identify the “triangle” or not?

A child’s cognitive skills, including the ability of children to describe cognitively challenging tasks, can also be seen through dynamic assessment. Here is an example of how a psychologist used dynamic assessment to evaluate the nonverbal cognitive skills of a 2 year 10 month old boy with Autism Spectrum Disorder (See 8:25 to 10:50). The psychologist described in his report what he saw as: Dynamic assessment demonstrated that George is intelligent and learns quickly. The evaluator showed George how to make a rubber duck fly into the air by placing the duck on the flat end of a spoon placed on the table and hitting the round end. George smiled and laughed and searched for the duck, although he did not make eye contact with the evaluator. George tried and had difficulty the first time, but after a second demonstration George was able to make the duck fly and seemed happy he made it happen.”

David’s dynamic assessment task reminds me of one that a great trilingual SLP, Barbara Dittman, showed me. She used the disappearing egg in the cup trick. Barbara would show the trick to the student and tell him how to do it. Then she would bring another person–a parent, teacher, or peer—and have the student do the trick and then explain to the person how to do it. Barbara learned about cognition and also about the student’s ability to explain a somewhat challenging task.

Recent articles demonstrate similar effectiveness of dynamic assessment in distinguishing bilingual preschoolers with and without disabilities. These dynamic assessment tasks for bilingual preschoolers include fast word mapping and a graduated prompting task with a novel word learning, semantic, and phonological awareness component.

Based on research going back several decades, the importance of dynamic assessment in accurate identifying a language disorder is well established. New studies continue to support its value. In addition to the videos on dynamic assessment and preschool assessment in general, the LEADERSproject.org has many resources available to anyone looking to sharpen their disability evaluation skills including test reviews, discussion of current law, regulations, and policies, and model evaluations.

Catherine J. Crowley, CCC-SLP, JD, PhD, Distinguished Senior Lecturer in speech-language pathology at Teachers College Columbia University, founded and directs the bilingual/multicultural program focus, the Bilingual Extension Institute, and the Bolivia and Ghana programs. An experienced attorney, Cate is working with NYCDOE on a multi-year project to improve the accuracy of disability evaluations. The LEADERSproject.org is a website dedicated to supporting quality clinical services and is funded by the Provost’s Office and several foundations.  Cate, an ASHA fellow, received the “2012 Humanitarian Award” from the National Council of Ghanaian Associations, and ASHA’s certificates for Contributions to Multicultural Affairs and for International Achievement.

Pragmatic Language Intervention for Adults with Autism

autism

 

A man enters the room, apparently comfortable with his surroundings and with those around him. Despite his large physique, he exudes a gentle demeanor and a genuine kindness as he approaches the other adults in the room. He curtly nods to a few people in the room, and then takes a seat in his usual spot. As he scans the papers in front of him, his face lights up and he points to a picture representing the day’s refreshments. He smiles at the woman sitting next to him and carefully produces the words, “Want…snack.” He nods again and smiles with noticeable satisfaction.

This man’s name is Jim, and he is an adult with autism. Jim attends one of the two Adult Language and Pragmatics Skills (ALPS) programs offered at Towson University’s Hussman Center for Adults with Autism. Like many other individuals on the autism spectrum, Jim struggles to communicate verbally and to engage in meaningful social relationships. These difficulties represent unique challenges for Jim and other adults on the spectrum. To address these challenges, Jim attends the ALPS group each week and participates in meaningful activities designed to explicitly address areas of need. The activities target communication in a variety of social contexts, and participants show subsequent improvements areas of need.

In addition to the positive changes observed with group participants, the ALPS programs also are gaining positive attention from families in the greater Baltimore community. Jim’s mother recently expressed her appreciation for the ALPS group and for the noticeable improvements she sees in her son’s communication. She wrote, “There are not enough words to express my gratitude to you and your team. Jim’s communication did significantly increase with the Fall session. I know that your program is critical to Jim’s continued progress.”

So what makes the ALPS programs at Towson University effective and attractive? Some would say the impressive amenities available at Towson University’s Institute for Well Being facilitate the programs’ success. Admittedly, the rooms equipped with multi-media technology and the fully furnished apartment in which adults can practice skills are indeed helpful. But the ALPS groups also offer experiences purposefully designed to incorporate evidence-based practice techniques for optimal success:

  1. Mentor/Peer Role Models – The use of peer role models is well-supported in the literature as an evidence-based practice intervention (Llaneza, DeLuke, Batista, Crawley & Frye, 2010; McGee, Almeida, Sulzer-Azaroff & Feldman, 1992; Orsmond, Krauss & Seltzer, 2004). Mentors from the ALPS groups include graduate student clinicians earning clinical hours in the speech-language pathology program, as well as undergraduate mentors earning service learning hours. Mentors plan the group sessions as well as individualized activities to target specific goals agreed upon by mentors and participants. The mentor-participant relationship emerges as a mutually-beneficial partnership in which each party experiences growth and personal satisfaction. Participants learn from the mentors through direct modeling experiences, and the mentors gain invaluable experience with adults on the spectrum. Often, the student mentors indicate that their perceptions of autism significantly change as a result.
  1. Relevant Topics – To foster meaningful learning experiences relevant to the unique challenges that adults with autism face, topics are selected that directly relate to participants’ everyday lives. Topics vary from semester to semester, but generally include practical themes such as nonverbal communication, managing emotions in moments of conflict, dating and relationships, self-advocacy, communication in the workplace, and increasing independence. Many participants suggest ideas for topics, and sessions are planned with the participants’ specific needs in mind.
  1. Universal Design for Learning Standards – To target specific strengths and needs of participants in the group and to incorporate learning style preferences, sessions are planned utilizing Universal Design for Learning (UDL) guidelines. The UDL approach asserts that to best meet the individual needs of diverse groups of learners, clinicians should offer (a) multiple means of presentation, (b) multiple means of response and (c) multiple means of engagement (Rose & Gravel, 2010). The ALPS groups at Towson University incorporate UDL standards in several specific ways:
    • Technology Tools – to increase engagement and to provide additional visual representation, ALPS groups routinely incorporate multi-media videos, interactive whiteboard activities, iPads, smartphones, and personal communication devices into learning experiences.
    • Response systems – to facilitate and maintain engagement of the group and to include nonverbal responders, discussions are often supplemented with systems that allow all participants to answer questions and express opinions simultaneously. Pinch cards, signs, color-coded paddles and gestures are all used to facilitate each participant’s communication of ideas and opinions.
    • Kinesthetic and tactile experiences – to include kinesthetic/tactile learning styles and to address participants’ need for movement for regulating sensory input, all sessions include activities requiring the participants to move. Sometimes the movement also serves as a mode of response (e.g., moving to a designated location in the room to indicate a choice), further integrating UDL guidelines.
    • Differentiated supports – to meet the needs of individual learners in a diverse group, activities are adapted specifically for each participant. Student mentors often create and implement visual supports, and provide hierarchical prompts to promote the highest levels of success and independence.
  1. Experiential Learning Opportunities – to address multiple learning styles and to provide hands-on practice, sessions often include functional activities that utilize social communication skills. Group members participate in role play activities, everything from acting out scripted dyadic communication to real-world experiences like ordering food in a restaurant. Participants do not simply listen to an instructor talking about strategies for successful communication; rather, participants engage in direct and relevant experiences that target effective communication and self-advocacy.
  1. Social Connection Opportunities – ALPS sessions are comprised of a variety of social experiences, encouraging participants to connect with others through structured practice. Whole group, small group and individual experiences are offered weekly as group members discuss ideas and opinions relevant to the session topic. Activities that foster partnership and cooperation are also utilized, encouraging participants to step out of their comfort zone as they practice social skills.
  1. Reflection and Review Experiences – All participants are encouraged to reflect on their experiences and to review important strategies. Each week, participants and mentors discuss progress and identify goals for the participant to consider in the week ahead.
  1. FUN – As one participant freely offered, “I don’t learn much when I’m bored. But I always remember the fun parts!” A preference for fun is certainly not unique to the autism population. Don’t we all remember the fun parts? To maintain an enjoyable and social atmosphere, sessions are planned using central themes. Activities, snacks, and even attire may revolve around the designated theme. Past selections include favorite movie, sport, travel and holiday themes. To further the fun, ALPS groups end each semester with a celebration party in which each group member is recognized for personal achievements.

All of these techniques are integrated into meaningful ALPS sessions for the advancement of pragmatic language and social skills. Future projects at the center include studies to objectively evaluate treatment efficacy and functional outcomes of the participants and mentors. While the ALPS groups continue to adapt and improve, the current success of the programs remains readily apparent. As we work to document improvements and successes, we are continually inspired by the adults who come to our center. Adults like Jim, entering our rooms with nods and smiles, looking for fun and friendly faces. Our hope is that these special adults feel equally inspired, and that they leave our rooms feeling successfully connected.

 

Lisa Geary, M.S., CCC-SLP, serves as Clinical Assistant Professor in the Department of Audiology, Speech-Language Pathology and Deaf Studies at Towson University. In addition to teaching and supervising graduate students in the on-campus Speech-Language Center, Lisa serves as program facilitator for the Adult Language and Pragmatic Skills Groups at Towson’s Hussman Center for Adults with Autism. Her teaching and research interests include Universal Design for Learning, Autism through the Lifespan, Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC), and Instructional Technology. Lisa can be reached at lgeary@towson.edu

 

References

Orsmond GI, Krauss MW, Seltzer MM. Peer relationships and social and recreational activities among adolescents and adults with autism. Journal of Autism Dev elopmental Disorders, 2004; 34:245–256.

LLaneza DC, DeLuke SV, Batista M, Crawley JN, Christodulu KV, Frye CA. Communications, interventions and scientific advances in autism: a commentary. Physiol Behav. 2010;100:268–276.

McGee, G. G., Almeida, M. C., Sulzer-Azaroff, B., Feldman, R. S. (1992). Promoting reciprocal interactions via peer incidental teaching. Journal of Applied Behavioral Analysis. 25 117–126.

Rose, D.H. & Gravel, J.W. (2010). Universal design for learning. In E. Baker, P. Peterson, & B. McGaw (Eds.). International Encyclopedia of Education, 3rd Ed. Oxford: Elsevier.

 

 

 

Rockin’ the ASHA Health Care & Business Institute

gary blog 2


Where the heck is everyone? Oh. I get it.

So…here’s a tale to share, OK? Yours truly, this intrepid, Down Easterner editor-in-chief for the ASHA Leader news magazine, is attending his first ASHA Health Care & Business Institute. It’s Vegas (baby!), glistening with probabilities and paradox: palm-tree-lined streets press against yellow-brown desert; a chiming, smoke-filled casino perches an escalator-ride above a bustling, professional conference. And there’s me, all nimble-like, sprinting the gauntlet of one-armed bandits, dashing down the escalator, caught up in a dizzying quest to nab an interview or two. It’s the perfect time, ay-uh. Sessions are running now, but—if my experience at hundreds of other professional conferences holds true—there’ll also be a fair number of folks milling and networking outside the meeting rooms or chatting up the exhibitors.

Nope. The hallway stands silent. I duck into the exhibit hall.

Nada. There be tumbleweeds a’ blowin’. Heck, even a fair number of exhibitors are nowhere to be found.

My goodness—everyone’s in the meeting rooms. Yes, folks, the sessions at the ASHA Health Care & Business Institute are that darn good.

Packed with more sessions and CEU opportunities than ever (hey, check out the awesomely convenient and affordable PLUS Package recorded courses CE option), the 11th ASHA Health Care & Business Institute attracted a near-record-breaking crowd from April 11—13. It’s not difficult to understand why.

  • Tons and tons of practical advice. Interested in the most effective strategies for contracting with employees and third parties? How about the six principles of influence to best leverage yourself and your brand? The impact of using mainstream versus less mainstream speech on your career? Tips for reading the body language of your clients and colleagues? Want candid advice from an entrepreneur on how to build your own practice? The sessions on business management and strategies were packed!
  • Up-to-the-minute coverage and tips. Want to learn the best way that your program or practice can thrive under the Affordable Care Act? What about the latest, greatest apps for pediatric populations and adults? Need to know about Medicaid for children in 2014 or this year’s billing procedures and codes for SLPs? What about the newest requirements for securing health information? Attendees had at their fingertips the most recent goings on affecting communication sciences and disorders at these popular sessions!
  • The latest advances from the frontlines of treatment. Session after session, many featuring legendary CSD researchers and clinicians, showcased the latest approaches to assessment and treatment for clients affected by a wide range of communication disorders—aphasia, dementia, dysphagia, childhood apraxia of speech, and autism spectrum disorder, among others. Some of these sessions were so well attended that folks were sitting in the aisles and on the floor in the hallway outside—I gave up my chair many times…

1HCBI1

So, with such a gang buster conference going on, what was this editor-in-chief supposed to do? When in Rome….I immediately jettisoned the interview-heavy approach to coverage and swore a courageous but ultimately foolhardy vow to cover the sessions as completely as possible through the Leader’s social media channels.

Picture this: It’s early Friday morning, and I begin hopping like a killer rabbit (beloved Holy Grail reference required) from one session to another, tweeting and posting photos at #ashaigers on Instagram. Listen, snap and tweet; listen, snap and tweet. Whew! By lunch I was stretched rather thin, and then I had to do it all again that afternoon, the next day, and the morning of the third day. I didn’t waver. My grandmother was right—when a notion takes my noggin’, I get as set and fixed-purposed as an old New England stone wall.

And now it’s time for a slice of humble pie. In the end, I must admit that the Great Social Media Effort was nobly conceived but executed imperfectly, because 1.) there were so many wonderful sessions going on that I simply could not do justice to all of them; and 2.) in many cases, I found myself so drawn in by a presenter, subject, and/or an audience’s enthusiasm and engagement that it was very difficult to leave the room. Grrrr. I. Just. Couldn’t. Cover. It. All.

At long last, with the Luxor and its Strip kin fading behind, I had time on the flight back to reflect on an outstanding conference. The attendees LOVED it and learned much. Those I spoke with were uniformly excited about the sessions; many pronounced the meeting as the best yet. They’ll be back next year, I reckon. Come hell or high water, I’ll be there, too. Perhaps leading an army of Leader editors to help cover it ALL next time. Ay-uh.

Gary Dunham, PhD, is ASHA publications director and editor-in-chief of The ASHA Leader.

 

Beyond Skype for Online Therapy: Protecting Student Privacy

Privacy

 

The trend for kids online is sharing more, not less. Today’s kids consciously and unconsciously share so many aspects of their life using Facebook, Skype or even newer tech tools like Snapchat. But, as educators, we hold ourselves to a much higher legal and professional standard for protecting the information of these very same students. We’ve all heard about the laws—FERPA, HIPAA, COPPA— that set the standards for privacy of student records and personally identifiable information, but what do the laws mean in the context of delivering speech-language therapy online?

HIPAA: Protecting Individually Identifiable Health Information

Created by the Department of Health and Human Services in 1996, The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is a federal law that protects patient medical records. HIPAA specifically protects “individually identifiable health information,” which includes:

  • the individual’s name, address, birth date and Social Security number.
  • the individual’s past, present or future physical or mental health or condition.
  • the provision of health care to the individual.
  • the past, present or future payment for the provision of health care to the individual.

HIPAA gives patients a variety of rights regarding individually identifiable health information. With consent, HIPAA permits the disclosure of health information needed for patient care, such as speech therapy.

FERPA: Protecting Education Records

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is a federal law that protects student education records. FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children’s education records until they turn 18 or transfer to a school higher than the high school level, thus making them “eligible students.” The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education. Under FERPA, parents or eligible students have the right to:

  • Inspect and review the student’s education records.
  • Request a school to correct records they believe to be inaccurate or misleading.
  • Prevent a school from releasing information from the student’s education record without written permission (with some exceptions).

COPPA: Protecting Children’s Personal Information

The Federal Trade Commission instituted COPPA (Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act) in April, 2000 to protect children’s personal information on websites and applications that target children under the age of 13. Under the legislation, websites and apps that collect this information must notify parents directly and get their approval prior to the collection, use or disclosure of a child’s personal information. The FTC describes personal information as:

  • A child’s name, contact information (address, phone number or email address.
  • A child’s physical whereabouts.
  • Photos, videos and audio recordings of the child.
  • A child’s “persistent identifiers,” like IP addresses, that can be used to track a child’s activities over time and across different websites and online services.

Recommendations for Online Therapy

Clinicians and educators often focus on the capabilities of individual pieces of technology, and, indeed, a secure therapy platform is highly recommended both to ensure the privacy of sessions as well as student data. However, it is the information, and the sharing of that information by the adults responsible for the care of each child, that these laws focus on. So educators need to focus on a systems approach that considers the end-to-end process of handling and securing student data.

While clinicians are trained in student identity protection, non-disclosure methods and the maintenance of student record confidentiality, it is ultimately the school’s responsibility to ensure agreements they have in place with online therapy service providers support them in protecting student privacy. So what are the practical considerations in this end-to-end approach to protecting the privacy of students receiving online therapy?

  1. Ask what type of security is in place. Solutions with bank-level security offer the strongest protection of data. This includes 256-bit encryption using TLS 1.0, restricted physical access to the servers on which data is stored, and 24/7 on-site security personnel.
  2. Use a secure platform for therapy. Secure platforms use an invite-only, encrypted, secure connection. In this model, only the online clinician and the student assigned to that particular appointment time are permitted to enter the password-protected “therapy room.” Parents may also view a session with a prior written request.
  3. Use a secure server to store data. Make sure all student files containing individually identifiable health information and education records are stored on a secure server using industry-leading security.
  4. Restrict access. Only online clinicians, authorized school administrators and parents should have access to this password-protected information, thus further protecting student privacy.

This “big picture” thinking will let educators take advantage of new online delivery models for therapy services AND stay compliant with privacy laws. And leave Snapchat to the students.

Melissa Jakubowitz, MA, CCC-SLP, is the Vice President of SLP Clinical Services at PresenceLearning. She is a Board Recognized Specialist in Child Language with more than with more than 20 years of clinical and managerial experience. She is the past-president of the California Speech-Language-Hearing Association and is active in ASHA, serving as a Legislative Counselor for 12 years.

Can Speech-Language Pathologists Diagnose Autism?

Posted response

On February, as part of its Posted series, the ASHA Leader asked on Facebook, “Do you, as an SLP, diagnose autism spectrum disorder independently or as a team?” The response we received was varied and indicated there is some confusion in the profession about what is proper, expected, or even legal. The biggest question that appeared over and over was, “How can an SLP diagnose independently?” The answer bears some explanation.

When it comes to assessing and diagnosing ASD, interdisciplinary collaboration is important due to the complexity of the disorder, the varied aspects of functioning affected, and the need to distinguish ASD from other disorders or medical conditions. Ideally, the SLP plays a key role on an interdisciplinary team, whose members possess expertise in diagnosing ASD.  In cases when there is no appropriate team available, however, an SLP who has been trained in the clinical criteria for ASD and who is experienced in the diagnosis of developmental disorders, may be qualified to diagnose these disorders as an independent professional. For more information check out ASHA’s new Practice Portal and/or position statement on autism.

In most cases, a stable diagnosis of ASD is possible before or around a child’s second birthday (Chawarska, Klin, Paul, Macari & Volkmar, 2009). An early, accurate diagnosis can help families access appropriate services, provide a common language across interdisciplinary teams, and establish a framework for families and caregivers within which to understand their child’s difficulties. Any diagnosis of ASD, particularly of young children, should be periodically reviewed, as diagnostic categories and conclusions may change as the child develops. Interdisciplinary collaboration and family involvement is essential in assessing and diagnosing ASD.

Assessment, intervention, and support for individuals receiving speech and language services should be consistent with the World Health Organization’s International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (2001) framework. This framework considers impairments in body structures/functions; the individual’s communication activities and participation; and contextual factors, including environmental barriers/facilitators and personal identity. There are recommended knowledge and skills for SLPs who are planning on working with individuals with autism spectrum disorder:

Knowledge required:

  • Federal and state laws and regulations regarding scope of practice, referral, and placement procedures.
  • Diagnostic criteria for ASD and related conditions (e.g., DSM-5).
  • Prevalence.
  • How to obtain information regarding etiology and related medical conditions.
  • Importance of early diagnosis and the role of the speech-language pathologis.t
  • How to evaluate the validity of diagnostic tools.
  • The necessary information to gather in a diagnostic evaluation about the child’s health, developmental and behavioral history, past intervention and academic history, and medical history of the family.
  • Other related diagnostic categories and when to make appropriate referrals to identify or rule out related conditions
  • How to rule out or confirm hearing loss while working with an audiologist.
  • The types of speech and language impairments that can co-occur with ASD, including features of language disorders, apraxia, and dysarthria.
  • How to share information about diagnosis with parents.
  • The challenges of determining eligibility for services for individuals with ASD, especially high-functioning individuals.
  • The needs of culturally and linguistically diverse populations, including the selection and/or adaptations of diagnostic instruments (ASHA, 2004b).

Skills required:

  • Observation, recognition, and interpretation of diagnostic characteristics of ASD.
  • Selection and correct use of valid diagnostic tools for ASD.
  • Appropriate referrals to other professionals to identify or rule out related conditions.
  • Diagnosis of the types of speech and language impairments that can co-occur with ASD, including features of language disorders, apraxia, and dysarthria.
  • Integration of findings from diagnostic tools for ASD, diagnostic evaluation, and information from other professionals or members of an interdisciplinary team, to determine diagnosis.
  • Documentation and communication of findings about diagnosis to family members, individually or in conjunction with a collaborative team.
  • Effective, delicate, and empathic communication when informing family members that the child has ASD.
  • Decision making about eligibility for services.
  • Appropriate recommendations and referrals for services and assistance to families in navigating the educational and health care systems, as well as promotion of self-advocacy.

Some state laws or regulations may restrict the scope of practice of licensees, however, and prohibit the SLP from providing such diagnoses. SLPs should check with their state licensure board and/or departments of education for specific requirements.

 

Understanding Autism: Restaurant Meltdowns

asd

I sat in a popular restaurant chain and watched an 8 year old boy have a major meltdown at his table.  His mother cringed as lunch time patrons stared.  An irritated couple at a nearby booth got up and moved, but only after glaring at the mother.  I’ll be honest, the child was disrupting my lunch too, but one thing I suspected was that this child had autism.  He appeared to be just like any other child, but the intensity of his outburst was out of proportion to the issue he was yelling about: The waiter had served him waffle fries and he had expected “skinny fries” just like the french fries served at home.

April is National Autism Awareness Month.  The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that 1 in 68 children are reported to have autism (ASD) and most are boys. Chances are, you know someone with autism.

What distinctive characteristics of ASD can affect a child’s ability to adjust to unexpected life events, even something as incidental as waffle fries?  Let’s look very briefly at some of the central features of ASD, while keeping in mind that this a spectrum disorder, with symptoms ranging from mild to severe and this list does not encompass all of the elements of a diagnosis. Just some of the central features that kids with ASD have difficulty with are:

  1. Social interaction, often including social reciprocity or that back and forth communication exchange known as conversation.
  2. Restricted behaviors and the need for “sameness” or the inability to be flexible with change.
  3. Hypersensitive and/or hyposensitive “to sensory aspects of the environment” which can hinder their ability to tolerate different tastes, temperature and/or textures of food and deal with change in general.

As a pediatric therapist,  I assess and treat a child’s ability to allocate specific cognitive resources in the brain to manage day-to-day life.  As adults, we too have to utilize many different parts of our brains throughout the day.  But what happens when we are bombarded with sensory input and suddenly, we have to adjust to unfamiliar stimuli? To understand what it’s like, consider this example:

You are driving the minivan full of kids to soccer practice, radio blaring, kids chattering.  Your brain is operating relatively smoothly, filtering auditory, visual, tactile and other sensations, while remembering to use your turn signal, maintain the speed limit, etc.  Suddenly, the weather changes and it starts to hail.  What’s the first thing you do?  Turn off the radio and tell the kids “Shush…Mommy needs to concentrate on the road.”  Perhaps you even slow down so that you can focus on the sudden change in driving conditions.  You have eliminated as much sensory input as possible so that you can concentrate on the task at hand – driving safely.  Isn’t it interesting that  you were driving perfectly fine until one unpredictable event changed in your environment?

Now consider the child with autism as he attempts to engage in mealtimes.  The reality is that daily life changes as easily as the daily weather report and for him, some days are just like driving through a hailstorm.  This child is already challenged by poor sensory processing; he has limited ability to take in information through all of the senses, process it and filter out the unimportant info, and then act upon only the relevant sensory input.

Now, bring that child to the family dinner table, which is all about social interaction and conversation.  Put a plate of food in front of him which looks and smells completely different from the last meal he was served.   Then, tell him to try that steamed broccoli for the very first time.  He doesn’t get to turn down the sensory input bombarding him at the table and focus just on the broccoli.  Because he has autism, he can’t always filter out which stimuli might be inconsequential and it feels so much safer to follow rigid behavior patterns and never try anything new.  Life for a child with autism is all about sticking to sameness. My role as a therapist is to help the child learn to deal with change.

A 2013 study from the Department of Pediatrics at Emory University indicated that kids with ASD are five times more likely to have feeding problems compared to their peers.  Once feeding difficulties are addressed in the home, restaurants are the next step for their families.  Here, the visual input is completely different and it changes constantly, the inconsistent auditory input can be overwhelming, the fluctuating smells may be interpreted as noxious, etc.   Every input to every sense has changed.   Once again, the child with autism is encountering a hailstorm and has to learn to tune out the distractions and focus on the task at hand – in this case, eating a meal away from home.  In this young man’s case, waffle fries were just too much to handle after managing all of the other sensory stimuli at the restaurant.

Perhaps you are a parent of a child with ASD.  Perhaps you have observed a child whom you suspect may be dealing with the daily challenges  of autism.  Thank you for considering what mealtimes feel like for him and his family.  It does get better, but it is a journey that requires patience from family, friends and the community.

Please share this article with a friend so that we can continue to raise awareness of autism spectrum disorder and if you know someone who loves a child with ASD, do something special for them this month in honor of National Autism Awareness Month – thank you!

Melanie Potock, MA, CCC-SLP, treats children birth to teens who have difficulty eating.  She is the author of Happy Mealtimes with Happy Kids and the producer of the award-winning kids’ CD Dancing in the Kitchen: Songs that Celebrate the Joy of Food!  Melanie’s two-day course on pediatric feeding is  offered for ASHA CEUs and includes both her book and CD for each attendee.  She can be reached at Melanie@mymunchbug.com.

Kid Confidential: The Latest on Treatment of Ear Infections

ear infection

For those of us speech-language pathologists who serve the birth-5 year old population (or have young children of our own), it is always important for us to know the most recent health and safety regulations that can affect our clients/students. Here are the newest regulations regarding the medical treatment of ear infections.

As otitis media affects three out of four children by the age of three, and there is a correlation between chornic otits media and communication delay, it is likely that we as SLPs will treat students with acute or chronic otitis media.  As a result we must understand the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines regarding the medical treatment of this condition.

Although, these regulations were initially released in 2004, it appears there is still much confusion among the medical community and, as a result, a second publication of the same AAP medical regulations for treating otitis media was released in 2013.

The regulations were written in response to antibiotic overuse and resistance in children.  Traditionally children are treated with antibiotics as the first line of defense for acute otitis media.  As there are a number of causes for ear pain, it is crucial that pediatricians firstly make an accurate diagnosis of otitis media prior to administration of antibiotics.  Doctors are urged to diagnose otitis media only when a moderate to severe bulging of the tympanic membrane (i.e. ear drum) is present.  Mild bulging and recent ear pain (i.e. meaning within 48 hours) exhibited along with other signs of ear infection (e.g. fever) also may be diagnosed appropriately.  Therefore, if the pediatrician is unsure of the diagnosis of otitis media he/she is discouraged t to prescribe antiobiotics.

Although pain is present, antibiotics are not necessarily to be considered the first course of action. In fact, in response to ear pain and/or low grade fevers, pain relievers are to be recommended initially as “about 70 percent of kids get better on their own within two or three days, and giving antibiotics when they aren’t necessary can lead to the development of superbugs over time” reports Dr. Richard M. Rosenfield, professor and chairman of otolaryngology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn.

Antibiotics are only to be prescribed when the child is exhibiting several signs or symptoms of otitis media (e.g. pain, swelling for at least 48 hours, fever above 102.2 degrees Fahrenheit, etc.).  Immediate prescription of antibiotics should be recommended in the event a child’s tympanic membrane ruptures.

Although it is important to understand the medical treatment of otitis media, perhaps it is more important for us to understand the simple preventive measures a parent can take to help avoid the development of ear infections in the first place.  In addition to this medical treatment plan, the guidelines also stress avoidance of tobacco exposure, receiving the influenza vaccination, and breast feeding exclusively for the first 6 months (if possible) as additional ways to prevent infant ear infections.

Medial guidelines for “silent ear infections” (i.e. middle ear fluid without presence of other symptoms typically following acute otitis media or colds) consist of “watchful waiting.”  If a child is diagnosed with “silent ear infections” also known as otitis media with effusion the pediatrician should initially provide no medical treatment.  A follow up reexamination should take place three to six months later.  If fluid persists for more than three months, the pediatrician should recommend a speech/language and hearing assessment.  If middle ear fluid persists more than four months and signs of hearing loss are evident, a pediatrician may recommend placement of PE tubes or refer their patient to an ENT for further assessment.

I very much appreciate the AAP for adding in the guideline of further assessment in the areas of speech/language and hearing if fluid persists longer than three months.  This demonstrates the AAP’s understanding of the important of communication development and the need for a quick resolution to such delays rather than the typical “wait and see” attitude that parents often report to encounter particularly in instances of “late talkers.”  Now we, as SLPs, have guidance and support from the AAP for our clients/students with long-term persistent middle ear fluid.

Please refer to the resources below for further information.

Resources:

Jaslow, R. (2013, February 25). Antibiotics for ear infections: Pediatrician release new guidelinesCBS News.

New guidelines for treating ear infections. (2004). The Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide.

 

Maria Del Duca, M.S. CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in southern, Arizona.  She owns a private practice, Communication Station: Speech Therapy, PLLC, and has a speech and language blog under the same name.  Maria received her master’s degree from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.  She has been practicing as an ASHA certified member since 2003 and is an affiliate of Special Interest Group 16, School-Based Issues.  She has experience in various settings such as private practice, hospital and school environments and has practiced speech pathology in NJ, MD, KS and now AZ.  Maria has a passion for early childhood, autism spectrum disorders, rare syndromes, and childhood Apraxia of speech.  For more information, visit her blog or find her on Facebook.

Collaboration Corner: In Defense of the Whole Child

wholechild

I treat children with autism. I’ve been doing it for a while now. As the numbers of children with autism peak a staggering 1:88 (Center for Disease Control, 2014), the demand for trained staff has gone through the roof. Many districts have specialized paraprofessionals whose primary job is to teach and support children with autism. In the Boston area, graduate and certificate programs related to ABA are cropping up everywhere, churning out new and enthusiastic graduates by the boatload.

Before I go on, there are three things you should know about me: 1) I have never been a diehard, one-shoe-fits-all clinician, 2) I embrace whole-heartedly the principals of ABA. It’s as an evidenced-based approach, and it works wonders for all sorts of kids, not just ones with autism, and, 3) If I couldn’t be silly with my students, I would just close up shop.

As an SLP, I know there are mountains of other kinds of research, and that child language and cognitive development that are important too. In this age of ABA, I find myself wanting to shout from the rooftops, “Wait! Stop! There’s more to this kid than just autism!”

Our role as SLPs and educators

Working with so many professionals “trained in autism” made me realize that, as SLPs, we bring to the table our knowledge of childhood language development, learning, motivation and context. Never before has this been more evident to me. We also bring the friendly reminder the importance of a playful approach and rapport building.

I’ve found myself shifting discussions to the whole child, and what we know about children and learning.

Here are some pointers I frequently share with staff:

  1. Appeal to the inner child first (yours and theirs). The individual comes before the label.
  2. Not every behavior can be attributed to one definitive cause. Environments, emotional state/regulation, personality, medical/biological components, all should be up for consideration.
  3. Assessment and intervention is a daily process, which is sometimes messy and dynamic (see #2). We won’t always get it right the first time. Or even the second time.
  4. It’s possible (and OK!)  to be structured and silly at the same time. Sometimes silliness increases engagement.
  5. Watch and learn from your kindergarten teachers (see #4). I’ve learned a lot from them about having fun while being structured, thoughtful and flexible.
  6. Use visuals even if the child is verbal or becoming verbal. We can model language through PECS, topic boards and Aided Language Stimulation techniques, within natural play activities.
  7. Strive to meet every child “where they are” in all aspects of learning: attention, behavior, communication and language development.
  8. We can’t make someone ready to learn or communicate; we simply lay the foundation.
  9. Learning can’t happen in a bubble. Context is just about everything. I know what a zoo is, because I’ve been in one, not because I’ve seen a flashcard of one.
  10. And finally, my favorite: Provide random acts of praise and compliments. Make daily deposits into that relationship bank. It’s a worthwhile investment.

 

Kerry Davis Ed.D., CCC-SLP,is a speech-language pathologist in the Boston area, working with children who have significant communication challenges. She conducts trainings and workshops, and serves as a volunteer speech pathologist and consultant for Step by Step Guyana, a school for children with autism in South America. The opinions expressed in this blog are her own, and not those of her employer.

Apps with Elders

elderapps

I am a tech savvy person. Use of technology is integrated into my life, and I am always learning something new. Currently, I am learning basic coding and web design to help private practice owners with their websites. Your website should tell your story and technology can make that happen. Perhaps I was a little naive, but it never occurred to me that maybe I should not use an iPad in my work with my geriatric patients in the SNF setting.

In the SLP social media communities I saw many SLPs using iPads or other tablets with their school or pediatric clinic caseloads. I saw what they were doing and thought, “Hey, I could do that with my patients.” And so I did. A few years ago when I got my CCC’s I gifted an iPad to myself.

And then I started using my iPad in therapy. There were a few bumps along the way, but I am still using it today. The iPad will by no means do therapy for you, but it is an excellent tool.

Five Tips to make using an iPad in therapy easier

Be confident to reduce the intimidation of technology. I start by asking if a patient has used an iPad. Then I briefly explain that it is a “little computer”, and we are going to use it to have a little fun in therapy. I gloss over the technology aspect and go straight to the fun. And then I choose an easy but interesting game, so they will have success when they are learning to use the tablet.

Use a stylus. A stylus is a pen-like instrument that the tablet will recognize similar to a fingertip. I pick them up for super cheap at stores like Marshalls or Ross. Some of the ladies I work with have gorgeously lacquered long fingernails. This almost always causes a problem, since tablets respond to fingertip taps rather than fingernail taps. A stylus will solve this problem.

Make it fun. Some of the games and apps can be quite challenging (just as any other task). When frustration starts to rise, I remind my higher level patients that we are just experimenting. If the solution or answer is not correct, we just figure out why and try something else. This approach seems to ease frustration. With my lower level patients, I do not allow that point of frustration to be reached. I use errorless learning and vanishing cues to increase success rate.

Keep your client relaxed. Because it is an unfamiliar technology there can be some anxiety about using it. I watch my patient’s body language. Is their brow furrowing, are their shoulders creeping up, are they tapping the stylus with great force? Sometimes I use subtle cues to help them improve insight into how they are feeling. Other times overt. These are great moments to talk about the effect of emotions (including anxiety) on cognitive function. Then I teach the strategy of doing something less taxing during these moments and moving back to more challenging tasks when they are feeling calmer.

Get a case. Get a case that allows you to prop up the tablet at different angles. This is really helpful for reducing the glare caused by different patient positions as well as making the tablet more accessible to those with mobility impairments.

Favorite Adult SLP Apps

Memory Match: If you are looking for an app to exercise use of memory strategies (visualization, association, verbalization) then Memory Match might be an app to check out. It’s $0.99 and available for iPad and Android. This is only suitable for clients that are able to generalize memory strategies and need activities to learn strategies.

ThinkFun Apps: Rush Hour and Chocolate Fix are great problem solving brain teaser apps that require use of deductive reasoning and logic for visual tasks. First, we identify the problem. Then, we work backward to solve it.

Tactus Therapy: This company makes some great apps. I have several, but my favorite is Conversation TherAppy. It is so versatile. I seldom use the scoring function of the app. The app has picture stimuli and a variety of prompts to target specific skills. I love not having to carry around a deck of picture cards. Have you dumped a box of stimuli cards on the floor? I have, too many times to count.

Google: Access the Google search engine via Chrome or Safari for endless possibilities. Do you have a client working on word finding tasks and needs a visual cue? Google it. Need a restaurant menu or a prescription label as a stimulus for functional questions? Google it. And I’ve been known to use it as a task motivator. Do your dysphagia exercises, then we’ll look up information about moose. (True story.)

Dropbox: Scan those 3-inch binders full of worksheets, protocols, and other information. Create PDFs and put them into Dropbox and have them anywhere you go with your iPad.  If you buy digital versions of books or tests to use on your iPad you will resolve the problem of original documents getting raggedy.

If you have an iPad or another tablet at home and haven’t used it for therapy, I recommend checking out what it can do. You might be pleasantly surprised.

Rachel Wynn, MS CCC-SLP, is speech-language pathologist specializing in geriatric care. She blogs at Gray Matter Therapy, which strives to provide information about geriatric care including functional treatment ideas, recent research, and ethical care. Rachel’s projects include: Gray Matter Therapy newsletter, Research Tuesday, and Patient Education Handouts. Find her on FacebookTwitter, or hiking with her dog in Boulder, Colo.