Want to Work in Acute Care Pediatrics? 5 Traits for Success

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It’s hard to believe I’ve been an SLP for 38 years! For most of that time, I’ve worked in an acute-care pediatric setting. I’m employed at the Florida Hospital for Children in Orlando, where I provide pediatric/neonatal swallowing and feeding services for multiple acute-care services, including neonatal intensive care, pediatric intensive care, newborn nursery, general pediatrics, oncology, epilepsy, ears, nose and throat, gastrointestinal, congenital heart surgery, plastics, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Thinking on my feet, but carefully considering both the evidence base and interdisciplinary perspectives, is a must every day.

Sometimes people ask me: What are you passionate about? What drives you?

I am passionate about the neonatal intensive care unit and our tiny patients. Being a part of this wonderful team and fostering the parent-infant relationship through supporting safe and successful feeding continues to fill my heart with joy after all these years. I am a lifelong learner and am passionate about creating opportunities to learn from physicians, nurses, respiratory therapists, my rehab colleagues and the families I serve.

Are you interested in working with these tiny and fragile patients? If so, here are some questions to ask yourself:

  1. Do you like to solve a puzzle? Problem-solving is essential in acute care! Critically thinking about a patient’s medical history and co-morbidities, then looking at the data and making sense of the information is key. Is the infant/child safe to feed? If so, what is the best approach? How can the child best communicate? What is interfering?
  2. Are you passionate about evidence-based practice? Physicians want to know why you are recommending what you are and what evidence there is to back it up. Sometimes the highest level of evidence is our clinical experience and wisdom. But we need to be aware of what hard evidence exists and bring it to the physicians.
  3. Do you work best in a team setting? Looking at the critically ill child works best in the context of multiple perspectives. Physician specialists, bedside nursing, respiratory therapists, dieticians and our rehab colleagues bring information that helps us make better clinical decisions. Through team interactions, we jointly problem-solve.
  4. Do change and unpredictability give you a buzz? Some days we need rollerskates! The day can change quickly with new consults, children being discharged, and changes in the patients we are treating. Being ready for change and staying focused are key to riding the wave.
  5. Are you well-grounded in normal and atypical development? This knowledge allows us to problem-solve and recognize what symptoms deserve our focus. Experience in birth-to-3 is invaluable for preparing to become a pediatric acute-care SLP.

Do the traits above sound like you? If you are thinking about moving into acute-care pediatrics, stay tuned for more to guide you on your journey!

 

Catherine S. Shaker, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, works in acute care/inpatient pediatrics at Florida Hospital for Children in Orlando. She offers seminars on a variety of neonatal/pediatric swallowing/feeding topics across the country. Follow her at www.Shaker4SwallowingandFeeding.com or email her at pediatricseminars@gmail.com.

 

Just Flip the Lip! The Upper Lip-tie and Feeding Challenges

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While many pediatric professionals are familiar with a tongue-tie, the illusive lip-tie hides in plain sight beneath the upper lip. Because I focus on feeding difficulties in children and an upper lip-tie can be a contributing factor if a child has trouble feeding, then I probably encounter more lip-ties than some of my colleagues. Still, I’d like to encourage my fellow SLPs to just flip the lip of every single kiddo whenever assessing the oral cavity. And document what you observe. Help increase general knowledge among professionals on different types of upper lip-ties by raising awareness of how they may impact the developmental process of feeding.

Upper lip-ties refer to the band of tissue or “frenum” that attaches the upper lip to the maxillary gingival tissue (upper gums) at midline. Although most babies should have a frenum that attaches to some degree to the maxillary arch, the degree of restriction varies. So it’s important to flip the lip of every child we evaluate in order to gain a better understanding of the spectrum of restriction – especially if you are an SLP who treats pediatric feeding.

During the feeding evaluation process, consider four things: 1) The mobility of the upper lip for breast, bottle, spoon and finger feeding; 2) How well it functions in the process of latching and maintaining the latch; 3) If the lip provides the necessary stability for efficient and effective suck-swallow-breath coordination; and 4) If the lip is an effective tool for cleaning a spoon, manipulating foods in the mouth and contributing to a mature swallow pattern.

Dentist Lawrence A. Kotlow has created an upper lip-tie classification system to better identify, describe and consider the need for treatment. The tie is classified according to where the frenum connects the lip to the gums, known as “insertion points.” Envision a child with a very big “gummy” smile and the upper gum line exposed. Divide the gums into three zones, as described in this article by Kotlow:

“The soft tissue covering the maxillary bone is divided into 3 zones. The tissue just under the nasal area (zone 1) is called the free gingival area; this tissue is movable. Zone 2 tissue is attached to the bone and has little freedom of movement… Zone 3 extends into the area between the teeth and is known as the interdental papilla. This is where the erupting central incisors will position themselves at around 6 months of age.”

Now, consider the insertion points. A Class I lip-tie inserts in Zone I and (unless extremely short and tight) does not inhibit movement of the upper lip and should not interfere with breast or bottle feeding. However, if the lip itself is retracted to the degree that a child cannot flange his upper lip for adequate latching and for maintaining suction, further consideration of this type of lip tie may be necessary. Class II lip-ties have an insertion point in Zone 2, where the tissue is attached to the bone. Kotlow describes the Class III tie as inserting in Zone 3, where “the frenum inserts between the areas where the maxillary central incisors will erupt, just short of attaching into the anterior incisor.”  A Class IV lip-tie “involves the lip-tie wrapping into the hard palate and into the anterior papilla (a small bump located just behind where the central incisor will erupt).”

How might an upper lip-tie impact the developmental process of feeding?

The impact of the upper lip-tie can vary according to its classification and, in my professional experience, the fullness of the upper lip also comes into play. But, in general, consider these key points:

Breastfeeding and Bottle Feeding

  • Breast – Inadequate latch: An infant must flange the lips to create enough suction and adequate seal around the tissue that includes the areola and not just the nipple. It is essential that babies take in enough breast tissue to activate the suckling reflex, stimulating both the touch receptors in the lips and in the posterior oral cavity in order to extract enough milk without fatiguing. When the baby suckles less tissue, painful nursing is also a result. One sign (not always present) is a callus on baby’s upper lip, directly at midline. While not always an indicator of a problem, it’s typically associated with an upper lip-tie. It’s simply a reminder to flip the lip!
  • Bottle – Inadequate Seal: Because bottles and nipple shapes are interchangeable and adaptations can be made, it’s possible to compensate for poor lip seal. However, these compensatory strategies are often introduced because all attempts at breastfeeding became too painful, too frustrating or result in poor weight gain…and the culprit all along was the upper lip-tie. It is then assumed that the baby can only bottle feed. I’ve assessed too many children held by teary-eyed mothers who reported difficulty with breast feeding – and no indication in the chart notes that the child had an upper lip-tie. But, upon oral examination, the lip-tie was indeed present and when observing the child’s feeding skills, the tie was at the very least a contributing factor. Releasing the tie resulted in improved ability to breast feed and progress with solids.
  • In addition, an inadequate latch and/or a poor lip seal may contribute to the following partial list of symptoms:
    • Gassiness; fussiness; “colicky baby”
    • Treatment for gastroesophogeal reflux disease, yet to be confirmed via testing
    • Fatigue resulting in falling asleep at the breast
    • Discomfort for both baby and mother, resulting in shorter feedings
    • Need for more frequent feedings round the clock
    • Poor coordination of suck, swallow, breathe patterns
    • Inability to take a pacifier, as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and noted here.

Spoon Feeding

  1. Inability to clean the spoon with the top lip
  2. Inadequate caloric intake due to inefficiency and fatigue
  3. Tactile oral sensitivity secondary to limited stimulation of gum tissue hidden beneath the tie
  4. Lip restriction may influence swallowing patterns and cause compensatory motor movements which may lead to additional complications

Finger Feeding

  1. Inability to manipulate food with top lip for biting, chewing and swallowing
  2. Possible development of picky, hesitant or selective eating because eating certain foods are challenging
  3. Lip restriction may influence swallowing patterns and using compensatory strategies (e.g. sucking in the cheeks to propel food posteriorly to be swallowed) which may lead to additional complications

Oral Hygiene & Dental Issues

  1. Early dental decay on upper teeth where milk residue and food is often trapped
  2. Significant gap between front teeth
  3. Periodontal disease in adulthood
  4. Possible changes in dentition with certain compensatory methods to propel bolus posteriorly for swallowing, such as finger sucking.

After documenting what we observe during the evaluation, clear communication with parents and other professionals will help to determine next steps. In feeding therapy, our role is to provide information for involved parents and professionals (this may include pediatricians, lactation consultants, otolaryngologists, gastroenterologists, oral surgeons and/or pediatric dentists). Our primary role is to determine, document and communicate to what degree the restricted top lip is influencing a child’s difficulty feeding.

For detailed information and additional photos, please read Kotlow’s article, Diagnosing and Understanding the Maxillary Lip-tie as it Relates to Breastfeeding, published in the Journal of Human Lactation in May 2013.

In a future post for ASHA, we’ll discuss tongue-ties (ankyloglossia) and the impact on feeding. Upper-lip ties are frequently associated with tongue-ties, so please remember to look for both during oral examinations.

Have you had an experience with an upper lip-tie impacting the feeding progress of one of your clients? If so, please tell us in the comments below.

 

Melanie Potock, MA, CCC-SLP, treats children birth to teens who have difficulty eating.  She is the co-author of Parenting in the Kitchen: How to Raise Happy and Healthy Eaters in Our Chicken Nugget World (Aug. 2015), the author of Happy Mealtimes with Happy Kids and the producer of the award-winning kids’ CD Dancing in the Kitchen: Songs that Celebrate the Joy of Food!  Melanie’s two-day course on pediatric feeding is  offered for ASHA CEUs.  She can be reached at Melanie@mymunchbug.com.  

 

 

Know Your CAS

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When I was pregnant, I remember dreaming about my new baby. My husband and I wondered aloud if she would be a musician like him, an athlete like me, or have some individual talent all her own. We had absolutely no doubts about what strong communications skills she’d have, however. Her mother was an SLP after all.

During her first year, my daughter lagged in all developmental milestones. I went to at least five different conferences on early intervention, but I couldn’t figure out why my daughter wasn’t a chatterbox. She met her first word criteria at one saying “hi” to everyone she met.

My husband’s mother reported he was late to talk and didn’t really say much of anything until after two. I had heard of late talkers, but because I worked at the elementary level, I never treated preschool kids. I brushed aside my pediatrician’s suggestion to seek treatment because I was convinced my daughter must be like her Daddy and that I could help her.

I finally took her in for an evaluation when she was close to three and received a diagnosis of childhood apraxia of speech and global motor planning deficits. After starting therapy based on motor learning principles, she made progress immediately.

Upset that I missed this diagnosis in my own child, I went on to endlessly and obsessively research childhood apraxia of speech. I was disappointed to find maybe eight pages on the subject in my graduate school materials. I know CAS is rare, but SLPs need to know about it and need to have the tools to diagnose and treat it correctly.

That summer I attended the national conference for CAS. The next summer I applied and was accepted into the Apraxia Intensive Training Institute sponsored by CASANA, the largest nonprofit dedicated exclusively to CAS. I was trained under three leading experts: Dr. Ruth Stoeckel, David Hammer and Kathy Jakielski.

If I could get one message out to pediatric SLPs, it would be for them to research and become familiar with the principles of motor learning and change their treatments accordingly for a client with CAS or suspected CAS. I know many like me get so little training or even information on it in graduate school. I’ve met other SLPs who were told it was so rare they would probably never treat it or even that it didn’t exist.

ASHA recognized CAS as a distinctive disorder in 2007. Taking the time to learn more about how treatment for childhood apraxia of speech differs from other approaches for speech and language disorders is crucial for kids with this motor speech disorder.  The importance of a correct diagnosis leads to a successful treatment plan. To briefly summarize, sessions should focus on movement sequences rather than sound sequences taking into account the child’s phonetic repertoire and encouraging frequent repetition.

For more information visit apraxia-kids.org and become familiar with ASHA’s technical report on the subject.

 

Laura Smith MA, CCC-SLP is a speech/language pathologist in the Denver metro area specializing in childhood apraxia of speech. CASANA-recognized for advanced training and expertise in childhood apraxia of speech, she splits her time between the public schools and private practice. She speaks at conferences and consults for school districts or other professionals. Email her at lauraslpmommy@gmail.com, Like her on Facebook, follow her on Pinterest, or visit her website at SLPMommyofApraxia.com.

 

 

Ten Speech and Language Goals to Target during Food/Drink Preparation

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Food and/or drink preparation can be an excellent way to help facilitate speech and language goals with a variety of clients that span different ages and disabilities.

Below are 10 speech and language goals that you can target during food or drink preparation:

  1. Sequencing: Because recipes follow steps, sequencing can be an ideal goal. If there are too many steps in a recipe then break them up into smaller steps. Take pictures of each step and create a sequencing activity using an app such as Making Sequences or CanPlan.
  2. Literacy: If a recipe has complex language that your client has difficulty reading and processing, modify it. I often rewrite recipes with my clients or use a symbol based writing program like the SymbolSupport app.
  3. Expanding vocabulary: Recipes often contain unfamiliar words. When beginning a recipe, target new vocabulary. If your client is an emergent reader, create visuals for the vocabulary words and use aided language stimulation as you prepare the food and/or drink with her.
  4. Articulation: Target specific sounds during food preparation. Are you targeting /r/ during sessions? Prepare foods that begin with r like raspberries, radishes and rice, or even a color like red!
  5. Describing and Commenting: Food/drink preparation can be an excellent time to describe and comment. Model language and use descriptive words such as gooey, sticky, wet, sweet, etc. Encourage your client to use all five senses during the activity (e.g. It smells like ____, It feels like ______).
  6. Actions: Actions can be an excellent goal during food and/or drink preparation. For example, when baking a simple muffin recipe, the actions such as measure, pour, fill, mix, bake, eat, can be targeted.
  7. Answering “wh” questions: As you are preparing food, ask your client open ended “wh” questions, such as “What are we baking?” or “Why are we adding this sugar to our recipe?” and more.
  8. Problem Solving: Forget the eggs? Hmm, what should we do? How about forgetting the chocolate in chocolate milk? Ask your client different ways of resolving specific problems with food preparation, such as: “What do you do if you are missing an ingredient?” or “What do you do if we add too much of one ingredient?”
  9. Turn Taking: Whether you are working with one or two people, turn taking occurs naturally during baking and/or food preparation. If you are working in a group, make assignments before beginning.
  10. Recalling Information: As you prepare the food/drink, ask your client to recall specific After you are done with the recipe, model language and then ask your client to recall the steps of the recipe.

Preparing even a simple beverage such as chocolate milk can be an excellent activity to engage in during a session. Although it’s made up of only two ingredients, you can still work on a variety of speech and language goals including sequencing, describing, problem solving (e.g. what to do if you put in too much chocolate), actions, turn taking and recalling information.

Here are some helpful apps to use during or after food/drink preparation:

I Get Cooking and Create Recipe Photo Sequence Books

Making Sequences

CanPlan

Kid In Story

SymbolSupport App

For more suggestions, check out my post here on getting a child with special needs involved in the kitchen.

 

Rebecca Eisenberg, MS, CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist, author, instructor, and parent of two young children, who began her website www.gravitybread.com to create a resource for parents to help make mealtime an enriched learning experience. She has worked for many years with both children and adults with developmental disabilities in a variety of settings including schools, day habilitation programs, home care and clinics. She can be reached at becca@gravitybread.com, or you can follow her on Facebook; on Twitter; or on Pinterest.

Six Vocal Myths: Practical Therapy Applications

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We all have a tree of knowledge that represents the intricate experiences that make each of us different and wonderful. Our branches stretch, flower and die only to grow into a more complex labyrinth of information. Once this tree is rooted in ideals, it is difficult to pull out any of the roots, especially if they have been supporting a perfectly healthy tree for many years.

I like science. I find a certain solace in knowing that a randomized control trial was completed in order to prove that I’m not just making you hum through a straw for fun. On the other hand, I completely give merit to the occurrences you can’t explain or rationalize. Some very important moments in my life, especially in my speech-language pathology career, cannot be measured and explained scientifically.

When I was younger, I was petrified that eating before a performance would screw it all up. I can remember vividly, sitting at a Texas Music Educators Association competition as a kid near me consumed an entire slice of pepperoni pizza before disappearing into his audition room. He leaned over and smiled, “It’s always good luck for me.” I was aghast, and I hope my face did not reflect what was going on in my head. Food? I thought. Before singing? NEVER! But, why did I believe so strongly that the voice gods would shun me if I ate a bite of anything? Should superstitions be revered? Is it really all in my head?

I posed that question to a few forums I belong to, both vocal pedagogy and vocal pathology. Along with comments and emails that flooded my inbox, the University of Minnesota and Truman State University brought me a study by Julia Edgar and Deirdre Michael that surveyed almost 400 singers about their beliefs in vocal health. The only thing everyone could really agree on? A whopping 97 percent believed that warming up before performing benefits the voice. That’s it. The rest of the answers were as scattered as an Admission, Review, and Dismissal team after the final meeting before summer break.

I pulled together the most interesting beliefs and did my best to find scientific evidence to aid in proving or refuting. I have questions from the professional singers I treat about many of these subjects, so what better way to debunk the myths? What I found was that many people hold their beliefs dear and are not willing to lend an ear to anything that might refute what gets them through a gig. So, what are we as SLPs to do? Do we believe in Grandma Sue’s recipes? Do we believe in science? Do we believe in experience? Do we believe in life after love? Sorry, Cher kind of snuck in there.

  1. Smoking marijuana and vaping is not damaging to the vocal folds like cigarettes are Reinke’s Edema, tissue damage in the form of gelatinous goo just below the top layer of the vocal folds, commonly occurs from smoking.  A study here discusses the effects of cigarette smoke on the delicate tissues of the vocal folds. Even the vocal folds of rats changed after passive inhalation of smoke. So that sets you straight…right? Not quite. A student told me that an alarmingly high number of voice performance students at her school claimed smoking marijuana and vapor cigarettes will not damage the vocal folds. Although there are not yet any published studies specifically about the effects of vaping on the vocal cords, a study here found that electronic cigarettes contain less carcinogenic ingredients than their tobacco counterparts, however less does not mean none. There is also concern that propylene glycol irritates the respiratory tract. (PG is just a fancy word for stage smoke.) Despite more than 1,000 studies on electronic cigarettes, conclusions cannot be made on their safety or danger because of contradictions and inconsistencies in methodology. Get it together people…I think people are learning this and deciding ECs are safe to smoke because of the lack of evidence. Perhaps they are fishing for an excuse. Perhaps they are avid consumers of research. In my clinical opinion, you are still inhaling something that is manufactured and exposing your most delicate tissues to foreign materials that may or may not be toxic. An article in the Guardian states that those who smoke ECs think the water vapor is safe, they brush off the PG as an irritant, and smoke them anyway. As for the marijuana, aside from altering perception and most likely performance, it is heated just like cigarette smoke and any smoke will irritate your tissue.

Bottom Line: Smoke can change the composition of your tissue. If you don’t inhale foreign material, your vocal folds will likely maintain their health.

  1. Throat Coat Tea and Entertainer’s Secret are a sore throat cure-allA 2004 study on the effects of laryngeal lubricants, like Entertainer’s Secret, revealed that even if a spray affects the vocal fold vibratory pressure, after 20 minutes it is like you never used it. Throat Coat tea contains slippery elm bark, a demulcent that soothes irritated tissue, and is not FDA approved to cure anything. There are no studies on how it directly affects the voice, but the steam from a hot beverage most likely will topically hydrate your vocal folds as you inhale, so that’s a plus. A hydrating beverage will provide you with internal hydration to lubricate the vocal folds from within the body. Like any pain, though, if your throat is hurting, don’t mask the problem by using numbing spray or another band-aid.  Your body is trying to tell you something and if you silence it, you could injure yourself further. Know your body.  I’m all for throat coat tea, ginger tea, lemon water, whatever–If you say it helps you feel better. I am against using any of that to hide pain so you can perform. If you are not giving your body time to heal, you’ll end up with a bigger problem.

Bottom Line: Using any crutch will usually get you through a performance, but “getting through” something may backfire on you. Instead, try to maintain a balance by keeping your body healthy, listening to it, and caring for your vocal folds even more fervently because you can’t see them.

  1. Whispering is a good idea to save your voice when on vocal rest. I was informed when I received voice therapy myself that I was not allowed to talk or whisper for a week following my surgery. Some people say the real myth is that whispering is as bad as shouting. Is it? For her own voice issues, an SLP who received treatment like me, was told that whispering would save the voice, but she found it to increase fatigue and pain for her. Go figure. Shouting and whispering differ in placement and technique, but whispering can sometimes turn into a hyperfunctional breathy voice where vocal production is made with an incomplete vocal fold closure. Ah, there’s the danger. A study in 2006 examined 100 patients with a fiberoptic camera. Only 70 percent of the patients showed supraglottic hyperfunction while whispering, meaning some of them had no hyperfunction at all. Other muscles are involved in whispering, and people whisper differently, so some studies suggest that whispering, when low in effort, can be considered for post-op patients.

Bottom Line: Whispering could turn into a poor vocal production habit in the majority of patients, so better to avoid it or monitor it closely on a case-by-case basis. If you were to whisper with a completely relaxed larynx, it’s hard to get adequate volume anyway. Tell them to text. Don’t we all have smart phones glued to our thumbs?

  1. Dairy products thicken my mucus. Recent publications have demonstrated that dairy products do nothing to chemically increase mucus production or viscosity, but why does the myth remain? A group of investigators from New York examined 21 individuals, half with asthma and half without, to see if milk increased mucus. It suggested that airway resistance was not altered by milk consumption, so no thicker mucus here. Perhaps if there is a milk allergy, the body will have a reaction to it? That might explain the widely-held belief that mucus will “gunk up vocal cords” and should be avoided. Unfortunately, I could not find any research studies about mucus thickening after eating or drinking dairy. Another study states that some people with asthma may see an improvement after eliminating dairy from their diets, however, it does not definitively prove that mucus production increases because of dairy products.

Bottom Line: You can throw science at your patients, but they may remain convinced that milk will gunk things up. You might be fighting a losing battle, but hey, at least calcium comes from other sources.

  1. Eating or drinking certain foods (or abstaining from them) will improve your performance. Okay, here we are with pizza singing boy again. He obviously thought that the pizza was his golden ticket for the American Idol of Texas choir competitions. Some performers believe licorice before a gig helps improve vocal range. One singer would consume an entire bag of licorice prior to a performance. Is this a placebo? After discussing, he stopped and the range remained the same. Hmm…. What about those singers that tell you eating Lays potato chips will lubricate their throats? Is this only in Nashville? What you eat and drink will not touch your vocal folds, it only touches the tongue, soft palate, throat walls and esophagus. If it is touching your vocal folds, you are aspirating! A recent post on a professional voice teaching thread inquired about what teachers advised singers to drink to lubricate their cords. Home remedies included vinegar, garlic, ginger, olive oil, sugar, and even aloe vera. None of these have scientific evidence that they are harmful to the voice, so if you think it helps, then by all means. Nothing really lubricates the cords from the outside, but drinking hydrating beverages lubricates from the inside, so this is kind of true…kind of…Just make sure you don’t become a yummy snack for your speech therapist if you come in smelling like an Italian dish.

Bottom Line: Hydration, Hydration, Hydration. There is no scientific evidence that certain foods or beverages will improve or hinder your performance. Water will always benefit the friction and heat created by your vocal folds by lubricating them on a cellular level. See also, my previous blog on beta-blockers and performance if your patient is considering anti-anxiety meds along with the olive-oil rub.

  1. Cold beverages, caffeine and alcohol are bad for your voice. A student at one of my lectures saw me drinking ice cold water in my handy Tervis cup. Those things are indestructible and I have one for every day of the week. Obsessed? Maybe. There is no evidence to suggest that cold water is bad for your vocal cords, I told him. Beer actually counts toward hydration, interestingly enough. These researchers found that when you are dehydrated, drinking beer will not only get you drunk, but hydrate you as well. Caffeine was found to usually not impact vocal acoustics if consumed conservatively (100mg), and this study showed that caffeine did not adversely affect voice production at all. Also, not related to voice specifically, this study suggested that coffee even hydrated similarly to water.

Bottom Line: Cold or hot, it’s your choice. And when there’s a choice, go with water over alcohol. Caffeine consumption should be examined along with other factors when recommending cessation in the therapy room. When I look at this, I think, Starbucks? Why not.

We have to be careful when presenting new information. Try hard not to claim information already known to be erroneous. Many established teaching professionals have been molding and creating performers for years, and trying to reveal a “new” truth might be unwelcome. Can we not bridge this gap between pedagogy and therapy? Between art and science? After all, the voice is both, isn’t it? Many SLPs told me they are afraid to challenge any voice teacher because they might get brushed off. I want to change this “challenge” to “suggest.”

If we are cognizant of the training and education of others, we can present information in a way that is not patronizing. And if we are open to new ideas from different sources, (I am so guilty of this too) then we might find that it works in our studios and clinics. One contributor had the most poignant response. “People become defensive sometimes when they are confronted by their own knowledge gaps, but hopefully they’ll internalize the information and emerge the better for having heard it.”

 

Kristie Knickerbocker, MS, CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist and singing voice specialist in Fort Worth, Texas. She provides voice, swallowing and speech therapy in her own private practice, a tempo Voice Center, LLC. She also lectures on the singing voice to area choirs and students. She belongs to ASHA’s Special Interest Group 3-Voice and Voice Disorders. She keeps a blog on her website at www.atempovoicecenter.com. Follow her on Twitter @atempovoice or like her on Facebook at www.facebook.com/atempovoicecenter.

CSD Students Use Their Skills in Ethiopia This Month

   

The CSD program at Teachers College Columbia University is in Ethiopia this month visiting schools for students with autism and a center for adults with intellectual disabilities. The TC Team—nine master’s students and three ASHA-certified SLPs: Lisa Edmonds, Jayne Miranda and I—used our experiences in Ghana and Bolivia to prepare for the trip.

At a vocational center for adults with intellectual disabilities the TC Team created “Seller’s Market Cards,” so the adults can independently sell their products. These low-tech Augmentative and Alternative Communication cards, laminated with packing tape, introduce the seller and list products for sale with their prices. We worked with the sellers to create the cards and then immediately tried them out at an impromptu market at the center!

At the Nehemiah Autism School, 20 teachers and our team spent the day collaborating to identify ways to bring more communication opportunities into an otherwise excellent school. We made 70 flash cards for weather, a large calendar, practiced social stories, and talked about ways to introduce literacy and math.

Right now, we’re presenting a five-day cleft palate speech institute at Yekatit 12 Hospital. Smile Train and Transforming Faces supported 14 cleft palate team professionals who attended from East and West Africa.

Please follow our adventures on the blog.  We love to see comments and are just halfway through our trip.

 

Catherine J. Crowley, CCC-SLP, JD, PhD, Distinguished Senior Lecturer in speech-language pathology at Teachers College Columbia University, founded and directs the bilingual/multicultural program focus, the Bilingual Extension Institute, and the Bolivia and Ghana programs. An experienced attorney, Crowley is working with NYCDOE on a multi-year project to improve the accuracy of disability evaluations. 

“Play It Again, Sam”: How the Use of Music is Reawakening the Minds of Many Individuals Battling Dementia.

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To say there has been a recent increase of videos on the web highlighting the power of music with individuals with dementia would be a vast understatement. From caregiver videos flooding YouTube to more carefully crafted films, such as Alive Inside, exploding on the scene, the individual stories being told are nothing short of remarkable.

But what does this mean for us as speech and language pathologists? And what does research say about the overwhelming number of anecdotal stories being touted on the internet? The answer to both questions is, A LOT! Many resources, such as the nonprofit organization MUSIC & MEMORY, now offer an extensive list of research citations that highlight the clinical benefits that listening to music can have on cognition and communication. It’s not just researchers taking notice of the mounting evidence. As the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services makes a push to decrease inappropriate use of antipsychotic drugs in long-term care settings, some of its efforts go toward funding personalized music programs to help address agitation and other behavioral concerns in a non-pharmacological way. Many states are also embracing this approach with great clinical outcomes to report.

So do we all switch professions and become music therapists? Of course not. The need for skilled speech therapists to directly target cognitive-linguistic deficits in long-term care settings is more important now than ever as the aging of our population and the dramatic rise in dementing illness converge, but the research and these dramatic personal stories should make us take pause and reconsider the environments in which we practice. As therapists we have a unique opportunity and perspective to be client advocates.

What information can we share, what videos can we show and whose life can we touch to be a catalyst for change in our communities? Consider your impact and take action today. Still need convincing? Let me leave you with one final image. Watch as Naomi Feil, founder of Validation Therapy, makes a power connection with Ms. Gladys Wilson. I wonder how many speech therapy screen forms were sitting in her medical chart stating she was “non-communicative” when this was filmed.

Robert Maxwell, MA, CCC-SLP is a speech-Language pathologist and clinical specialist for Genesis Rehab Services. He currently chairs the dementia special interest group for Genesis Rehab Services and has presented on the company, local, state and national level with regards to cognitive-linguistic and swallowing deficits related to the dementia population. He can be reached via email at: Robert.Maxwell1@genesishcc.com

Tales From Apraxia Boot Camp

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In August of this year, I was selected to be a part of The Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America’s 2014 Intensive Training Institute, otherwise known as “Apraxia Boot Camp.” Twenty-four speech-language pathologists, including myself, trained with three mentors–Ruth Stoeckel, Kathy Jakielski, and Dave Hammer–at Duquesne University over four days. In its third year, the goal of the boot camp is to spread a high level of knowledge about Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) assessment and treatment throughout the United States and Canada. This conference accomplished that and so much more.

This experience was different than any other continuing education seminars that I have attended. We did not listen to speakers discuss CAS. Instead, Ruth, Kathy and Dave became our mentors. This was powerful. They moderated discussions on evaluation and treatment approaches. We reviewed research papers and had long debates on the principles of motor learning. We highlighted and critiqued therapy methods for those brave enough to show videos of themselves. We problem solved and brought up more questions than we knew were possible.

In smaller groups, our mentors provided insights and personal perspectives on how they work. In this intimate setting, we felt comfortable asking questions and sharing our experiences. The mentors shared constructive criticism along with thoughtful suggestions. In all, they made me think, reflect and question everything I do. Why do I give that test? Why do I treat that way? What is the research behind it? They encouraged us to become critical thinkers.

As therapists, we often get used to using the same materials and therapy techniques we learned in graduate school or during our early experiences. Those methods are not always effective with every child we treat nor are they all proven effective with evidence based-research. Specifically, children with CAS require different therapy techniques than other children with articulation or phonological delays.

Ruth, Kathy and Dave provided valuable information in a small, engaging setting. Their mentoring and passion for CAS has inspired me and I hope to pass along this valuable information to others through mentoring, improving my competency in treatment and diagnosis of CAS, and, in the end, helping children to communicate.

Based on my experience, I’d recommend asking yourself a few questions when selecting your next continuing education event:

  • What am I passionate about? Is there a child or an area of speech pathology that truly inspires me?
  • How will it improve my skill set?
  • How will it help me better serve my clients?
  • Who is doing the most current, researched-based evaluation or therapy techniques?
  • How will it further our profession?

 

Amanda Zimmerman, MA, CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in Columbus, OH. She can be reached at azimmerman@columbusspeech.org.

How to Prepare to Speak at ASHA Convention for the First Time

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This year I will be presenting at the ASHA Convention for the first time. The first time I attended an ASHA convention was last year in 2013. I enjoyed the sessions I attended and set a goal to speak at an ASHA convention sometime during my career. Thanks to partnering with amazing SLPs across the country I was able to  propose five sessions for the 2014 convention. Even though I felt that each proposal was an exciting topic, I did not expect all five to be accepted as talks (or get accepted at all). But that is exactly what happened. My first time speaking at the ASHA convention, I will be involved in five sessions. Due to scheduling conflicts, I will be speaking at only four of the sessions (see below for details). So how am I going to prepare for this? Here are three things:

 

1. Stay organized. Juggling the preparation for five sessions is not easy, so organization is key. I am reducing repetitive and inefficient work by only working on presentations at specific times. To respect my fellow presenters, I am communicating when I will be able to complete individual tasks. I schedule my presentation work sessions based on established deadlines.

Working with many co-presenters (all across the country) means many emails about our presentations. I created a file folder in my email for each presentation. I file each email in the presentation’s folder. This keeps everything together in case I need to refer back to details such as deadlines, ideas, to-do lists, and plans.

I have coordinating file folders in Google Drive for document storage (e.g. proposals, slide deck drafts, my presentation notes, etc). All the documents for each presentation are kept together. Since it’s all in the cloud, I won’t leave it behind.

 

2. Reduce inconveniences. The worst part about conventions and traveling for training for me is food. I have Celiac disease and other food allergies. Convention halls aren’t the best venue for finding gluten free, healthy food. Last year I spent $20+ on lunch, when I bought a sandwich with no bread or fries (because they were fried in the same fryer as gluten) and put the meat on top of a salad. I essentially bought 2 lunches to create one lunch (and I was still hungry).

So this time, I am doing myself a favor and anticipating a busy schedule and poor food options. I found a company that will make premade meals and deliver them to my hotel (for a lot less than $20). My hotel room has a fridge, so I will keep the premade meals in the fridge and bring lunch with me. I will not waste time on long lines or risk  getting sick.

 

3. Prepare for fun. The ASHA convention isn’t my first speaking engagement as an SLP. I have been speaking about dementia and ethics in healthcare to my fellow SLPs, other healthcare professionals, students, and family members via webinars, courses, video conferences, etc. I keep doing it because it’s fun! I thoroughly enjoy creating a presentation for a specific audience to help them reach their goals. My career has evolved into spending the majority of my time in an education role. For a former teacher, this is a very welcome evolution.

 

The pre-presentation nervousness comes, but reminding myself that each speaking opportunity is an opportunity for fun and to inspire better dementia treatment and elder care relieves my jitters quickly. I am thankful for each and every opportunity, including the several at ASHA’s convention this year. See you there!

 

Rachel Wynn is one of four guest bloggers for ASHA’s convention in Orlando and will be speaking at the following sessions:

 

Friday, November 21, 2014

  • Clients at risk for suicide: Our experiences and responsibilities (Session Code 1310) 8:00-10:00 a.m.
  • Get out of that box! Four creative mold-breaking models of private practice (Session Code 1441) 3:30-4:30 p.m.

 

Saturday, November 22, 2014

  • Social media for SLPs: Leveraging online platforms to connect and advance your practice (Session Code 1704) 1:00-2:00 p.m. (Not presenting due to scheduling)
  • Dementia 101 for students and new clinicians: Changing lives through a functional approach (Session Code 1720) 1:00-2:00 p.m.
  • Productivity pressures in SNFs: Bottom up and top down advocacy (Session Code 1755) 2:30-3:30pm

 

Rachel Wynn, MS, CCC-SLP, specializes in eldercare, and, as the owner of Gray Matter Therapy, provides education to therapists, healthcare professionals, and families regarding dementia and elder care. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 15 (Gerontology) and an advocate for ethical elder care and improving workplace environments, including clinical autonomy, for clinicians.

Interviewing Rehab Companies: How to Find an Ethical Job

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The most frequent questions I see on forums about finding a job or interviewing are:

  • What do you know about X company?
  • What is a good hourly rate for SLP in X location?
  • What kind of questions will they ask during an interview?

These are good questions, but, given the concerns many of us have about ethical practices in skilled nursing facilities, I believe we could focus on better questions. Why? Well let’s take a look at the common questions:

What do you know about X company?
In my experience talking to therapists about ethical dilemmas, I have not come across one company that is through and through unethical. There are some really great directors of rehab who will buffer corporate productivity pressures and advocate for clinical autonomy. They are dedicated to patient-centered care. Make sure you are able to interview the person that would be your immediate supervisor.

That being said, there are some companies that foster patient-centered care from the top. I am interviewing them and featuring them on my blog Gray Matter Therapy as I am connected with them. (If you have suggestions, contact me.)

What is a good hourly rate for SLPs in X location?
I believe SLPs provide an outstanding value to their rehab teams and should be compensated appropriately, but as an advocate for patient-centered care rather than profit-centered care I think about my wage in a different manner. In talking with therapists who work for ethical companies, I find we have something in common. We get paid a little less, but we never feel pressured to work off the clock and we are allotted time to complete important non-billable tasks.

Use ASHA’s salary data as a starting point, but consider the entire compensation and benefits package. I consider my quality of life and work-life balance to be a benefit. And I feel better about myself when I can focus my energy on patient care rather than number games.

What kind of questions will they ask during an interview?
This varies drastically. Most companies asked me logistical questions such as: When can you start? Can you work weekends if required? Can you be X% productive? I have been to a few interviews where I was asked how I would handle a particular client situation. I like those questions. It is evidence to me that my interviewer cares about the quality of the therapy patients receive, rather than just the quantity.

Turn the tables: You ask the questions
Take another look at the title of this post, “Interviewing Rehab Companies.” That’s not a typo. It’s not supposed to say “Interviewing With Rehab Companies” or “How to Answer Interview Questions Perfectly.” In my previous career, I interviewed job candidates. The candidates who brought thought-out questions (writing them down is OK) were my favorite. They did a little research beforehand and thought about what they could give to the team. They were thinking about continual growth. They made great employees.

Another reason to ask questions is to learn the answer to the question I get most often: “Is this an ethical company?” The only way to find out is to ask. Ask the interviewers questions, such as:

  • How would you handle a situation when a patient is on a particular “resource utilization group” (RUG) level; however, at the end of their assessment period they have a stomach bug and don’t want to participate in therapy?
  • How are discharge dates (from each discipline and the facility) determined?
  • Will you provide an example of how activities and restorative nursing coordinate with therapy in order to best serve patients?

Your interviewer might be a little surprised if you ask tough questions. Don’t worry about this. One of three things will happen:

  • It will be a good surprise. Your interviewer will see your concern, care and critical thinking and know you’ll be a good team member.
  • They won’t like it. You might be considered someone who questions authority. You won’t get hired. That’s OK. One of the big complaints I hear from therapists is the lack of clinical autonomy they have in jobs. You’ve just screened a potential employer and avoided that situation.
  • They won’t like it, but they are desperate to fill the position. They offer you the job. That’s OK. Now you get to practice saying “no.” If the job doesn’t meet your expectations, don’t take it.

By agreeing to work only in ethical workplaces, you are advancing the bottom-up approach to affecting change. Thank you, from all of us!

If you are looking more suggestions on finding an ethical job, read the “Interviewing Tips for Finding Ethical SNFs” post at Gray Matter Therapy.

Please join us at the ASHA Convention in November for the session, “Productivity Pressures in SNFs: Bottom Up and Top Down Advocacy.” Check the program planner for details.

 

Rachel Wynn, MS, CCC-SLP,  specializes in eldercare, and, as the owner of Gray Matter Therapy, provides education to therapists, healthcare professionals, and families regarding dementia and elder care. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 15 (Gerontology) and an advocate for ethical elder care and improving workplace environments, including clinical autonomy, for clinicians.