@speechroomnews Speaks Out on #ASHA14

Jenna

I went to my first ASHA convention unsure of what to expect. I knew CEUs, exhibit hall swag, Orlando sunshine and lines at the ladies restroom were certain. While all these were true, the most important parts of the conference for me were friendships and renewed energy.  Throughout the convention you might have seen daily hash tags used to discuss and promote daily happenings. They turned out to be a good marker of all the different parts of my trip as I reflect on the weekend.

#asha14roots: I’ve only been an SLP for five years, so my roots don’t grow very deep in this field yet. At the conference, I got to hug clinical supervisors and undergraduate friends. Lunch with a fellow Ohio University Bobcat made me thankful for all the people who have played a part in my SLP history thus far.

#asha14branches: Branching out was my favorite part of ASHA. Specialist from all over the country taught the CE courses. It’s something you just can’t get at your local courses. Listening to sessions about hands-on research happening in different parts of the country got me so excited about the growth in our field. I look forward to following the results of the various projects funded through grants or universities.  In the exhibit hall, I got to put a face to the many names I email throughout the year. Although apps are nothing new, I was really impressed with the increasing level of complexity in new apps.  It’s not much of a secret that I love speech therapy materials. I have a closet-full at work and a closet-full at home. The exhibit hall had a variety of new materials. There is something special about a speech therapist that makes a tool that works for her clients, who then turns that into a business to make materials available for other professionals.

#asha14leaves: I’m leaving ASHA with some excellent plans for my preschool caseload. I’m going to increase my use of informational text and increase multi-step play routines to develop language within one level of play. I love leaving sessions with specific ideas for next week’s therapy.  I’m leaving ASHA with new networking connections. I did some planning with Yapp Guru to talk about cataloging app reviews.  I’m leaving with new ideas about Social Thinking from Michele Garcia Winner’s sessions. Most importantly, I’m leaving with new SLP friends. Sometimes being the only SLP in your building can feel isolating. Being amongst 12,000 fellow professionals has made me remember that I have connections all over the world. Our job is a unique blend of science and arts. The convention renewed my excitement for our field and my fellow SLPs. See you next year in Denver!

 

Jenna Rayburn, MA, CCC-SLP, is a school-based speech-language pathologist from Columbus, Ohio. She writes at her blog, Speech Room News. You can follow her on FacebookTwitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

 

My First ASHA Convention: The Perspective of a Graduate Student

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How To Get There

My exposure to the ASHA convention up until this year was limited to the experiences of others: faculty members who discussed their presentations; doctoral students who presented their work at the conference; and tales of bright-eyed graduate students who had attended their first convention. But amidst the busyness of the end of the semester I wasn’t prepared for just how amazing my first ASHA convention experience was going to be.

My journey to the 2014 ASHA Convention started earlier this year, when I saw a post on ASHA’s Facebook page announcing the Student Ethics Essay Contest. Like most other graduate students, I did not have an expendable income to support my conference attendance, so I figured it was worth a shot to enter the contest! I never expected to win and am so honored. It was a rewarding and enriching experience to examine the Code of Ethics in greater detail, and I encourage graduate students to enter the contest in future years.

Why Go as a Graduate Student?

I didn’t really know what to expect of the convention and I wasn’t sure how useful it was going to be for me, but it turned out to be an incredibly valuable experience. As a second year graduate student, I now have the level of knowledge and assuredness of which areas are most interesting to me to allow me the focus necessary to be productive at the convention.

Here are some compelling reasons to attend an ASHA convention as a graduate student:

• Perhaps the most exciting part of the experience was being surrounded by thousands of other people who have the same interests, passions, and who are doing similar work. It was validating and encouraging to be sitting in a room full of students, researchers, and clinicians who have the same questions that I do, and who were there seeking answers, knowledge, and ideas from other clinicians and researchers. There is so much to learn!
• It is a great way to network. For example, while at the convention I had the opportunity to meet a professor from another university whose project I am assisting with from a distance and discuss the next steps of the project.
• Jobs, jobs, jobs! There are so many recruiters in the exhibit hall, from all kinds of settings. It is the best feeling to walk around, peruse the different opportunities and locales, and feel confident that our field is in such a need that we can find work pretty much anywhere!
• It is a great opportunity to gain experience presenting research. Submit a poster and if it is accepted there are always ways to find funding, like through your local NSSLHA Chapter or your graduate program department.

 

What It’s Like

Once at the convention, I quickly had to accept the fact that it was impossible to see every presentation that I wanted to. So instead I strategized and attended talks that are relevant to my clinical placements and other intriguing topics that I won’t get the chance to learn about in my rotations. Things that stood out:

• The days are long and the presentations are many. I was faced with the choice of attending Short Courses (CEU courses), Sessions, Poster Presentations, and Technical Sessions – all of which co-occur! So having a sense of focus was important.
• The beauty of ASHA is that there are so many presenters that you are bound to find many presentations that you’re interested in. My two greatest areas of interest are voice and bilingual (Spanish/English) speech-language pathology, so that’s primarily where I focused my time, but I also stepped out of my comfort zone and attended a talk about using Passy Muir valves in the pediatric population, as well as a really interesting talk about qualitative research using ethnographic interviewing in the Mexican immigrant population in the US. My favorite talks were the ones that ended in great conversation and a common sharing of ideas and knowledge between clinicians and researchers alike.
• I was impressed with the NSSLHA Experience program, which is geared toward current and prospective graduate students in both speech-language pathology and audiology. Experienced clinicians, current clinical fellows, and leaders in our field presented about the ins and outs of preparing for the PRAXIS exam, how to secure a quality Clinical Fellowship experience, and the important differences between a mentor and supervisor.

I wasn’t ready to leave and I am still thinking about the wonderful people I met, all of the opportunity in store for the future of our field, and the next generation of speech-language pathologists and audiologists. See you next year, in Denver!

Christine Delfino is a second year master’s student in the Speech and Hearing Sciences Department at Arizona State University studying bilingual speech-language pathology. She was the first place winner of the 2014 Student Ethics Essay Award. She can be reached at cdelfino@asu.edu.

Lessons Learned from #ASHA14

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Before the convention, I wrote a blog post about how to prepare to speak at the ASHA convention for the first time. When I wrote the post, I had spoken at another convention; however, I attended that convention as a speaker rather than the primary goal to participate in continuing education. At the ASHA Convention I planned to do both.

As I write, it is Sunday morning after the convention. I am reflecting on what went well and what didn’t go well as a speaker and attendee (not in regards to the convention in general).

 

What Went Well

I stayed organized. I used the resources I mentioned in my previous post to stay organized with my presentations. I also designated a paper folder to put information I would need paper copies of (e.g. shuttle routes, tickets, speaker’s notes, and master schedule). My master schedule was a great compensatory strategy for someone with a tired and busy brain. I will use the same system next year.

 

My food was amazing! Not only did I not get “glutened” (I have Celiac’s disease), but also my food was delicious and I didn’t stand in line waiting for food and I could eat on my schedule. The premade meals I ordered (external source) were a major success. It was relatively inexpensive to have delicious food pre-made and delivered to my hotel. I felt like I beat the system! Traveling is usually full of extra energy finding food I can eat and worrying if I’ll get sick (and dealing with it when I do).

 

I had a ton of fun! I was able to reconnect with friends and colleagues I haven’t seen since last year. I made new friends and connections. Sessions were inspiring. Several sessions had amazing speakers that couldn’t hide their excitement for being there. I love to see that excitement in a presenter. I went to a few large group events and quieter, smaller events too.

 

What I’ll Do Different Next Year

Submit fewer sessions. As I mentioned in my prior post, I didn’t anticipate all of the sessions would get accepted. I will submit fewer sessions next year. With so many sessions, it was challenging to schedule meetings and focus on relationship building at the convention. There were some conversations that I really would have liked to continue in order to form professional partnerships. (Thankfully, I can reach out to those people via email to continue the conversation.) Next year I won’t submit as many.

 

Book better flights. In Chicago, I left too early. This year I’m leaving too late. My flight doesn’t depart until 8:40pm on Sunday. The buzz from the convention has halted and I’m ready to go home to my family. Of course, next year it will be in Denver. I live in Boulder, so the convention center is a 35-minute drive from my home. No flights necessary. Travel will be much easier next year!

 

Sleep more. I was so excited to present on Friday morning (and inspired by Thursday’s sessions) that I was wide-eyed in the early hours of the morning, which meant I got about 3-hours of sleep. Just like I tell my clients all the time, adequate sleep is so important for your brain. I was processing slower, tripping on my words, and lost my place in conversations and while speaking in sessions! Anyone have suggestions for turning down excitement and wonder?

 

Overall the 2014 ASHA Convention was an excellent experience. I feel so inspired from the sessions I attended, people I met, and presenting. I have so many ideas help make the first quarter for 2015 amazing for Gray Matter Therapy.

 

Rachel Wynn, MS, CCC-SLP, specializes in eldercare, and, as the owner of Gray Matter Therapy, provides education to therapists, healthcare professionals, and families regarding dementia and elder care. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 15 (Gerontology) and an advocate for ethical elder care and improving workplace environments, including clinical autonomy, for clinicians.

Tales From Apraxia Boot Camp

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In August of this year, I was selected to be a part of The Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America’s 2014 Intensive Training Institute, otherwise known as “Apraxia Boot Camp.” Twenty-four speech-language pathologists, including myself, trained with three mentors–Ruth Stoeckel, Kathy Jakielski, and Dave Hammer–at Duquesne University over four days. In its third year, the goal of the boot camp is to spread a high level of knowledge about Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) assessment and treatment throughout the United States and Canada. This conference accomplished that and so much more.

This experience was different than any other continuing education seminars that I have attended. We did not listen to speakers discuss CAS. Instead, Ruth, Kathy and Dave became our mentors. This was powerful. They moderated discussions on evaluation and treatment approaches. We reviewed research papers and had long debates on the principles of motor learning. We highlighted and critiqued therapy methods for those brave enough to show videos of themselves. We problem solved and brought up more questions than we knew were possible.

In smaller groups, our mentors provided insights and personal perspectives on how they work. In this intimate setting, we felt comfortable asking questions and sharing our experiences. The mentors shared constructive criticism along with thoughtful suggestions. In all, they made me think, reflect and question everything I do. Why do I give that test? Why do I treat that way? What is the research behind it? They encouraged us to become critical thinkers.

As therapists, we often get used to using the same materials and therapy techniques we learned in graduate school or during our early experiences. Those methods are not always effective with every child we treat nor are they all proven effective with evidence based-research. Specifically, children with CAS require different therapy techniques than other children with articulation or phonological delays.

Ruth, Kathy and Dave provided valuable information in a small, engaging setting. Their mentoring and passion for CAS has inspired me and I hope to pass along this valuable information to others through mentoring, improving my competency in treatment and diagnosis of CAS, and, in the end, helping children to communicate.

Based on my experience, I’d recommend asking yourself a few questions when selecting your next continuing education event:

  • What am I passionate about? Is there a child or an area of speech pathology that truly inspires me?
  • How will it improve my skill set?
  • How will it help me better serve my clients?
  • Who is doing the most current, researched-based evaluation or therapy techniques?
  • How will it further our profession?

 

Amanda Zimmerman, MA, CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in Columbus, OH. She can be reached at azimmerman@columbusspeech.org.

#ASHA14 Audiologist in the House

blogI have been attending the national ASHA convention since 2008 in Chicago, but this year is a special first for me–MY FIRST ASHA CONVENTION AS A CERTIFIED DOCTOR OF AUDIOLOGY!!! I started attending ASHA as undergraduate while still trying to determine if I wanted to study audiology or speech-language pathology. As an undergrad, ASHA was a little overwhelming. The graduate school fair and exhibit halls, as well as the many networking events, were greatly beneficial, but as I still didn’t have a concrete plan or field, my choice in sessions was eclectic and I don’t know how much I got out of them.

The next several years I served on the NSSLHA Executive Council as a delegate for Region 8 and then as a representative for Region 3, and even though I was “at convention” I was very busy with meetings and helping run NSSLHA Day and as such, didn’t get to many sessions. The networking has always continued to be phenomenal and I loved being emcee of the NSSLHA Battle of the Regions Knowledge Bowl, but I was missing out on sessions.

Last year, as a fourth year extern who was free of meeting and other responsibilities, I was finally able to attend as a regular attendee and found some great sessions (which after three-and-a-half years of grad school, I could understand), but this year will even top that as I now have a job as an educational audiologist and can search out sessions related to what I do on a daily basis.

I always look forward to continued networking and social events as well as the exhibit hall. I’ll be sure to check out Audiology Row, the opening plenary session and closing party (Where’s my owl with a letter inviting me to Hogwarts?). As I’ve been researching audiology sessions, I selected so many sessions and posters that were of potential interest that I’ve only got two slots that don’t have conflicting sessions. I’m working on whittling the list down, but there are some sessions I feel I need to catch. Management of School‐Age Children With Hearing Loss: From the Clinic to the Classroom (#1019) is one I feel will be particulary relevant. As I’m learning the ropes at my new job (I’m the only educational audiologist in a rural four-county area of Maryland), I’m rapidly discovering that regular follow-up with dispensing/managing audiologists is not something that always happens with my students due to geographic and socio-economic issues. As such, I’m starting to develop relationships with some of the audiologists at the Children’s Hospital a couple hours away where many students were initially fit.

I’m also looking forward to some sessions and posters on APD as working in the school, it is a “hot topic.” Disentangling Central Auditory Processing (CAP) Test Findings: A Road to Greater Clarity (#1110) , Differential Diagnosis & Intervention of Central Auditory Processing Disorders (#1405), and Treatment Efficacy of the Fast ForWord-Reading Program on Language in a Child With SLI/APD (6036 poster #136).

One final session I’m also very excited about is Noise Exposure & Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Among Rural Adolescents (#1492). The area in which I live and work has agriculture and aquaculture as two significant components of the local economy in addition to many recreational opportunities for noise exposure (hunting, shooting, ATVs, boating, etc) and I feel there will be opportunities to work on implementing some hearing conservation education at the high school level for many of the students I serve.

What are some of the sessions you’re looking forward to? See you in Orlando!

Caleb McNiece, AuD, CCC-A, is a new grad and educational audiologist for the Mid-Shore Special Education Consortium which serves four county school systems on Maryland’s eastern shore. Caleb is a former NSSLHA Executive Council member and is passionate about audiology students, audiology advocacy, pediatric audiology, and private practice.