Get Some Book Drive Know-How

July 25 (2)

 

In low-income neighborhoods, one book for every 300 children? In middle-socioeconomic status neighborhoods, 13 or more books for every child? I read this jarring statistic and had an epiphany. As a university professor, mother of a school-aged child, and part-time itinerant public school speech-language pathologist, I wondered if there was a way I could help effect change for the low-SES children in my own area?

SLPs all over the United States battle with the problem of students who present with cognitive, linguistic, and executive functioning deficits related to being from low-SES backgrounds. Sometimes these students have genuine, underlying language impairments and qualify for language interventions, but many times they are typically-developing language learners whose language deficits stem from their low-SES status and its accompanying disadvantages. As experienced SLPs, we all know that low literacy skills can have lasting and serious consequences. A shocking statistic indicates that in states such as California and West Virginia, prison cells are built based in part upon the number of third grade students who are reading below grade level. What could I do to help?

I decided to attack the problem of a lack of books for children in low-income homes. I started collecting new and gently-used children’s books in fall of 2008 for a graduate student’s thesis. We collected several hundred books, which she used, and then she graduated from our program. In April of 2009, my beloved mother, Beverly Roseberry, died of a heart attack. Mom had been a general education and Sunday school teacher. In the Philippines, where I grew up (my parents were missionaries), my mom always had books for my sisters and me despite the fact that we were quite poor. On one island we lived on, my mom even started a library for the Filipino children. She loved books, and made sure that my sisters and I did, too! I decided to keep the children’s book collection going in my mom’s memory. Today we have collected and donated more than 43,000 books to local children in under-resourced areas. There are 21 area agencies and organizations receiving our books as well as three elementary schools.

 

July 25

Third grade students at Whitney Elementary School receive books to keep and read during the summer.

It can be discouraging for SLPs who work with at-risk, low-SES children to address the seemingly insurmountable obstacles that these children face. One of these obstacles is the lack of access to age-appropriate reading materials. How can the average SLP gather children’s books to distribute to low-SES children to keep as their own? Here are some tips for being successful:

  1. Have a large, attractive, marked box in a central location that is easy for people to get to
  2. Make the collection time-limited (e.g., 1-2 months)
  3. Have a short flier explaining why books are being collected and who they will be shared with. On the flier, have a contact person with contact information (like an email).
  4. If possible, donate the books locally to groups of children that your audience of donors cares about. For example, the books collected by the Orangevale Rotary go to the Orangevale Food Bank. Books collected by moms in Davis go to Head Starts in Davis. People are most enthusiastic if books stay local and connected to them somehow.
  5. Be sure to pick up the books on a regular basis. Don’t let that box overflow and make a mess!
  6. Challenge your group to collect a certain number (e.g., 100-500 books). People love a numerical goal.
  7. Keep reminding people—announcing the book drive one time will not be sufficient.
  8. At the end of the book drive, celebrate with a treat! Share information about where the books went. If possible, share pictures of children who have received the books.

I have had several undergraduate students in our program gather between 300-800 books just by asking their friends. Members of service organizations such as the Rotary often like to take on a project such as a book drive. Churches are another great source. My own church, Bayside, has donated more than 5,000 beautiful books!

Most of all, remember: people love to donate books for a good cause. I have found that many, many people have children’s books sitting around in their homes gathering dust; however, the people are so sentimentally attached to the books that they cannot just give them to a faceless organization. Having a person specifically attached to the book drive—a face to identify with—helps people become more willing to part with books that hold precious memories. If you are the “face” of your book drive, most people will be very generous in their donations.

A book drive has several major advantages: 1) low-income children benefit greatly from having their own books, and their literacy skills improve; 2) your friends get to clean out those closets, and 3) you get the joy of seeing children own their own books—for many, these are the very first books they have ever owned. Collecting and donating children’s books is something I will do for the rest of my life, and I have been privileged to have tremendous support from my students, church, family, and friends. Good luck!

Celeste Roseberry-McKibbin, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is a professor in Sacramento State University’s Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology and also works directly with students ages 3-18  as a speech-language pathologist in the San Juan Unified School District and has writes a blog about her book drive. She can be reached at sacbookdrive@gmail.com.

The Bosnia Autism Project

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Over the years, Speech Pathology Group: Children’s Services International (SPG: CSI) and the government of Bosnia-Herzegovina have combined their efforts to establish and implement a ground-breaking program, The Bosnia Autism Project. Our mission has been to “teach the teachers” and provide sustainable aid to children with communication impairments.  Lisa Cameron has recently extended the SPG: CSI efforts to the Himalayan country of Bhutan, and Marci VonBroembsen remains active in South Africa. SPG: CSI is truly expanding and going international!

From 2009-2012, SPG: CSI sent specialized teams of professional volunteers to provide evidence-based assessment and treatment education to professionals, university students and parents in Bosnia- Herzegovina. This past summer, SPG:CSI  worked with a four-year old who was hidden in his house because his family was ashamed of his disability. We met a 12-year-old who had never been to school and whose parents would lock him in his empty “bedroom” (merely a concrete room and a bucket) because he was nonverbal and had become so aggressive that they did not know how to control his behaviors.

Because of the tireless efforts from professionals in Bosnia-Herzegovina, and SPG: CSI’s dedication, together we have achieved amazing results! We are ecstatic to tell you that in October 2012 both our four-year old and the 12-year old started attending school and are doing well. For the first time students with autism and other disabilities are receiving treatment, a home-based intervention program has been established, parents are being educated, and the numbers of treatment centers continue to grow. But our mission is far from complete.

We are now in phase three of the Bosnia Autism Project, which is providing advanced training to the community leaders and medical and educational specialists.  In an effort to maximize our efforts, we have invited seven key professionals and medical specialists to train with us in California for three weeks in the summer of 2013. These trail-blazing pioneers will receive advanced training in communication assessment and treatment strategies for children of all ages and stages, and go back to Bosnia to train other professional peers, leading them through a professional transformation.

For those of you who have wanted to participate with the non-profit but were unsure how, we invite you to get involved. Now is the time—and you don’t have to make the trek overseas!

  1. Visit our website and learn more about the Bosnia Autism Project.  Any and all help is welcomed, without long-term commitments.  Contact us at info@spgcsi.org or spg.csi@gmail.com if you have any questions or want to get involved.
  2. Friend us on facebook at  to follow the most up to date information, see pics and follow the progress of our Bosnian colleagues.
  3. Join us at California Speech Hearing Association Convention for a 90-minute informational seminar (Thursday, March 8th) and Happy Hour at the Hyatt Long Beach on Friday March 9th.  Check out our website for more information.

Larisa Petersen, MS, CCC-SLP is in her third year as a Speech-Language Pathologist.  Currently, she works for The Speech Language Pathology Group in Walnut Creek, California.  She provides speech-language services to students in Kindergarten through sixth grade.  She updates the blog for The Bosnia Autism Project and you can visit her at http://spgcsi.wordpress.com.  Also written by Anna Taggart, Leah Huang, and Raquel Narain.

The #ASHA12 Experience

I would like to start off by thanking ASHA by selecting me to be one of this year’s Official Bloggers. This year’s convention was a fabulous experience all around.  From Maya Angelou’s inspirational opening ceremony talk to the tear-jerking Annie Glenn award ceremony. To have followed Gabby Gifford’s recovery effort and then watch her accept the award was very moving.  This was all followed by a pretty awesome closing ceremony at the Georgia Aquarium, which totally blew last year’s “lawn party” out of the water, excuse my pun.   I mean who could beat watching some sharks swim by with a few thousand other SLPs?

In between all the events I mentioned above were, of course, some great sessions, a huge exhibit hall, and a maze of a convention center. I literally got lost a few times. The two highlights of the convention for me was getting to participate in NSSLHA Day and meeting all the fabulous #slpeeps that interact over Twitter all year round.

For NSSLHA Day I presented a crash course entitled iPads and Apps. This was a blast and I got to meet some awesome grad students who were eager to learn about some awesome apps to use in therapy. I also got this nifty certificate of appreciation and recognition. Thanks again NSSLHA!

Like I mentioned earlier meeting the #slpeeps from around country was so much fun. We learn a lot from each other throughout the year so it’s always such a neat experience to meet these great therapists in person. There were over 30 #slpeeps that met for dinner on the Wednesday before ASHA started and several more that met for ASHA’s official Tweetup. If you haven’t considered Twitter or social media I highly recommend that you look into it and start building your personal learning network (PLN)! Oh and in case you missed it there was also a flash mob that was organized by PediaStaff and two of the #slpeeps Aubrey Klingensmith and Mai Ling Chan.

One of my favorite sessions at #ASHA12 was Sara Ward’s on Executive Function. It was two solid hours of practical idea after idea. These were the type of ideas that could be implemented immediately and work.  One of the big takeaways from the session was here concept of “future glasses” that kids put on to help them envision what the final outcome of what they are working on should look like. This helps with organization and time management. Genius! That’s all I have to say.

So as I finish writing this post I will place on my Future Glasses and look forward to what #ASHA13 will bring us.

(Jeremy is one of the official ASHA Convention bloggers. These three bloggers were selected to blog about the ASHA Convention in exchange for complimentary registration. Stay tuned for more insights from him and the other bloggers before, during and after convention.)

 

Jeremy Legaspi, CCC-SLP, is a Speech-Language Pathologist at Foundations Developmental House. He concentrates on autism, AAC, apraxia, articulation,phonlogy, and some feeding. You can follow him on twitter @azspeechguy and check him out on azspeechguy.wordpress.com andwww.therapyapp411.com

A New Song

At the 2012 ASHA Convention in Atlanta I wondered at the unique set of peoples I encountered. Everyone was eager to join sessions, share ideas, and offer words of encouragement to the newbies like me. There wasn’t a hint of selfishness of information; what helps one professional has the possibility to help thousands more when shared. The amount of evidence displayed and excellence of clinical translation encouraged everyone who attended. Since this was my first convention, I was astounded at the amount of work others from around the country are doing to advance the science and techniques of the profession…and I thought I was busy?!

In Dr. Maya Angelou’s key note address, she said “A bird doesn’t sing because it has an answer, it sings because it has a song.” We all have a song to sing in the form of our profession. We perform our job based on evidence and training; yet it is more than that. There is a calling to help each patient, caregiver, and family, not out of a sense of duty; rather, from a sense of purpose and resolve to impact and further another person’s recovery and development.

Where is all the evidence going once it is presented in sessions or posters? When a presenter outlined an idea to change an approach based on new evidence, did you feel compelled to consider it? While I have yet to fully work as an SLP, I’m developing an idea of how easy it is to become complacent in “what works.” The theme for the convention “Evidence of Excellence” hinged on the idea that evidence drives our excellence as professionals.  Merely hearing the song of others’ research and results doesn’t seem like enough. Application and translation of research is what the ASHA Conventions are all about, no matter the theme. A time to gather as a profession and hear what is being done to improve and propel us all. I don’t want to sing the same song for the rest of my professional and personal life; I’m hoping I’m open enough to grow and develop along with our profession. Are you?

The 2013 ASHA Convention will be in Chicago, Illinois. I plan to attend in order to let my song be heard. Will you? Whatever the theme may be, you can rest assured the people met and sessions attended will give you a new song to sing with even greater enthusiasm and excitement. See you there!!

(Katie is one of the official ASHA Convention bloggers. These three bloggers were selected to blog about the ASHA Convention in exchange for complimentary registration. Stay tuned for more insights from her and the other bloggers before, during and after convention.)

 

Katie Millican, B.S. Ed., is a second year graduate student in Speech-Language Pathology program at the University of West Georgia (UWG). Katie is the current UWG local NSSLHA chapter President.  She is active with the #slpeeps and #slp2b on Twitter (@SLP_Echo) and on Pinterest, and she writes her own blog SLP_Echo: Just another SLP in the Making. Katie has a passion for using technology and sharing evidence-based ideas. 

Convention Must-Have: Twitter

I was really excited when I was selected to become an official ASHA blogger.  I blog anyway, so it was nice to get an official title.  I had planned on blogging a little everyday, but things have been crazy and before I know it, it’s time for bed.  I decided to go ahead and blog on Friday, the next to last day of the convention!

Throughout convention I kept hearing “how do you incorporate Twitter into therapy?” or “so how do you use Twitter?”  It seems there is either a lot of resistance to Twitter or people just really have no idea how to use it or how to get started.

Originally, I intended to write about my trip here, the sessions I attended, etc., but I think I’ll save that for later and instead write about Twitter.

I started my Twitter account about two or three years ago, around the time of my first ASHA Convention.  As much as I enjoyed the convention, I really didn’t socialize a lot or leave my hotel room other than to go  to sessions.   Through that convention, I started getting more involved in Twitter and started forming friendships there.

The 2011 convention was so much better having such a large group of friends to spend time with and share my ASHA Convention excitement.

This year has been a whole new experience.  I have a much larger group of friends, a really great roommate and amazing opportunities coming my way, all thanks to Twitter.   We had a great “Tweet up” this year with many new and familiar faces.  It’s always so nice to meet those people you’ve been talking to online.

How do I use Twitter?  I use it in so many different ways.   I ask and answer therapy questions through Twitter.  We have a whole network of SLPs called the #SLPeeps.  We have specialty people in various areas: literacy, fluency, technology, apps  and dysphagia.

I use Twitter to announce changes to my website, new blog posts, exciting news like earning my BRS-S, and to share links to videos or websites that I find relevant or interesting. I use it to share important information at ASHA from professional development sessions that I attend, or CEU events that I attend outside of ASHA.  If I find a really great session, I share that.  If I find a new product, I’m excited to talk about it and let others know.

So many people say they don’t have time for Twitter.  I can access Twitter on my phone and on my iPad, allowing me to post a Tweet any time of day.  I can post on Twitter in just a few minutes.  It’s really only as time-consuming as I allow it to be.

When I talk to people about Twitter, I tell them that’s it’s an excellent learning opportunity for me and a way that I have met many new friends that I may not have otherwise met.    I proudly wear my “I Tweet” and “#SLPeeps” ribbons on my badge and tell everyone who asks me about Twitter that it has been one of the most life-changing opportunities I have experienced.

(Tiffani is one of the official ASHA Convention bloggers. These three bloggers were selected to blog about the ASHA Convention in exchange for complimentary registration. Stay tuned for more insights from her and the other bloggers before, during and after convention.)

 

Tiffani Wallace,CCC-SLP, has been an SLP specializing in Dysphagia for over 11 years.  Tiffani has been very active in the social media world, creating 2 Facebook groups, Dysphagia Therapy Group and Dysphagia Therapy Group-Professional Edition.  Tiffani is also the co-author of the app Dysphagia2Go, available on iTunes.  She is preparing to travel nationally and speak on the topic of Dysphagia.  Tiffani writes a blog called Dysphagia Ramblings and is the author of www.dysphagiaramblings.com.  She is a 5 time ACE awardee and recently obtained her BRS-S.

Pre-ASHA Convention Blog Roundup

2012 ASHA Convention logo

At long last, the 2012 ASHA Convention is upon us! If you’re either already in Atlanta or heading there, here are some links to helpful posts by fellow attendees, both past and present:

  • Tara Roehl gives instructions on how to create your convention schedule using Google Docs.
  • Aubrey Klingensmith has reated an “#ASHA12 Survival Guide” of apps that might come in handy during Convention.
  • Ruth Morgan has scoped out Atlanta for gluten-free options and offers some great suggestions for those who can’t just grab a quick bagel or a muffin during Convention.
  • While Kristin Mosman unfortunately won’t be attending this year, she has compiled a great list of things she wishes she’d known before attending past ASHA Conventions.
  • Ready to finally bite the bullet and learn what all this social media stuff is about, but not sure where to start? Lucky for you there will be many resources at Convention to help. There is an invited session on Thursday at 10:30 am (Session #1003) “A How-To of Social Media: Technologies, Trends and Traps.” I will be attending Convention from Thursday through Saturday and happy to help give hands-on help with the ASHA Community and/or any other social media question you may have. I’ll be splitting my time between the Volunteer Village, the exhibit hall and various events including the ASHA Tweetup on Friday at 5 pm in the Leader Lounge. Finally, the #slpeeps and #audpeeps have paired up with Pediastaff and will be offering many different social media resources including a learning lab, a social media learning center, and several “Tweet & Greet” sessions.

If you aren’t attending this year’s convention, stay tuned to ASHAsphere for updates from the official ASHAsphere Convention bloggers, as well as follow-up posts from other attendees. You can also watch from afar on Twitter by following @ASHAconv and the #asha12 hashtag. And you don’t have to suffer alone–there’s even a hashtag for those who aren’t able to be at Convention: #ashaless!

 

Maggie McGary is the online community & social media manager at ASHA, and manages ASHAsphere.

Southern Charm at #ASHA12

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Where the food is fried and the tea is sweet, Atlanta promises to be a great host for the 2012 ASHA Convention. It’s only appropriate that my first-ever ASHA Convention is in my home state. I’ve been living in a Graduate School cocoon for the past year, so it will be fun to take off my speechie training wheels and revel in the knowledge and fun. I have been reading and listening to the #ASHA12 hype on Twitter and blogs, which makes me even more excited for the three-day event. I keep finding sessions I want to attend, like the First Timers Orientation, the pre-convention session “The iPad & Your Therapy: Apps, Accessories, Accessibility, & Features,” or “Laryngeal Manipulation: Why, When, & How.” Then there are the vendors I don’t want to miss like Pediastaff (Booth #1823), LessonPix (Booth #617), and Tactus Therapy (Booth #828). So many excellent sessions and vendors to choose from; how are you deciding which ones to attend?

The annual ASHA Convention seems like the best opportunity to learn the newest techniques, listen to what others have been doing, and determine the best way to not seem overly creepy with excitement for this profession. Since I am almost done with graduate school, everything seems to revolve around my enthusiasm for our diverse profession. I’m just trying to take advantage of all these amazing sessions and vendors in one place without overwhelming myself. How are you keeping it all straight? I’ve received the most support from the #slpeeps on Twitter. Based on their stories and advice, I think I can control myself enough to attend sessions and still have equal amounts of fun.

I’m also looking forward to dining around the Georgia World Congress Center. There are so many great places to choose from like Googie Burger, Taco Mac, Der Biergarten, Park Avenue  Deli & Market, and so many others right around the convention center. If you are new to the Atlanta area and plan to leave time to venture further out, consider The Varsity, Max Lager’s Wood-Fired Grill & Brewery, The Vortex, or Ormsby’s. Wherever you choose, I hope you enjoy the beautiful city of Atlanta.

I would also like to take a moment to impart some southern charm upon the excitement of #asha12. Especially to those who have also never been, or to those may not be as excited as they’ve been in previous years:

  • To all of the seasoned, flavorful, and spicy SLPs, I look forward to meeting you at the convention. I will giving away handshakes if you can find me (@SLP_Echo) during the convention (Get ‘em while they’re hot)
  • To my fellow SLP graduate and undergraduate friends, let us convene upon Atlanta with our eagerness to learn and willingness to volunteer for anything.
  • To my fellow #slpeeps, may we entice new SLPs to join the Twitterverse.
  • To those who slaved over a poster presentation, oral session, technical session, or any other session, may those who attend the sessions bring enough enthusiasm it’s worth every minute.
  • To those attending the Wednesday workshops by GSHA , may the extra day in Atlanta make you want to eat peaches and  drink Coca-Cola till you have a southern accent.
  • To those who are dancing in the flash mob (aka #ashamob), may people appreciate the happiness it brings as well as the eloquence of the ‘booty roll’.
  • To the adventurous #asha12 attendee, may you fill up on southern comfort food and fall prey to using “Ya’ll” at least once while you are here.

Keep track of all the happenings before, during, and after the convention on Twitter and ASHAsphere. Wait, what’s that? You don’t use Twitter?? Well, don’t be shy; join the ranks and check out how to get started here.  Can’t wait to see everyone at the 2012 ASHA Convention in Atlanta, GA!!

(Katie is one of the official ASHA Convention bloggers. These three bloggers were selected to blog about the ASHA Convention in exchange for complimentary registration. Stay tuned for more insights from her and the other bloggers before, during and after convention.)

 

Katie Millican, B.S. Ed., is a second year graduate student in Speech-Language Pathology program at the University of West Georgia (UWG). Katie is the current UWG local NSSLHA chapter President.  She is active with the #slpeeps and #slp2b on Twitter (@SLP_Echo) and on Pinterest, and she writes her own blog SLP_Echo: Just another SLP in the Making. Katie has a passion for using technology and sharing evidence-based ideas. 

 

#ASHA12 Infographic

If you’re following the 2012 ASHA Convention hashtag #ASHA12 on Twitter, you know that the excitement has reached a fever pitch with just one week to go. Here, in infographic form, are some tips to help you navigate Convention.

For more detail on how to customize your own planner as I mention in tip 1 above, here’s another post detailing how I did it.

(Jeremy is one of the official ASHA Convention bloggers. These three bloggers were selected to blog about the ASHA Convention in exchange for complimentary registration. Stay tuned for more insights from him and the other bloggers before, during and after convention.)

 

Jeremy Legaspi, CCC-SLP, is a Speech-Language Pathologist at Foundations Developmental House. He concentrates on autism, AAC, apraxia, articulation,phonlogy, and some feeding. You can follow him on twitter @azspeechguy and check him out on azspeechguy.wordpress.com and www.therapyapp411.com

11 Tips for the 2012 ASHA Convention

I am officially excited about ASHA 12. (Not that I haven’t been since last year in San Diego). I hope to meet many of my readers, Facebook and Twitter friends at ASHA in Atlanta this year. I figured it’s that time of year that I should post a little bit about my recommendations in preparation for ASHA.

  1. If you don’t already have one, create a Twitter and Facebook account. Join SLP groups and on Twitter, find the #Slpeeps. I am @apujo5 on Twitter. Benefits of social networking for the ASHA convention? You get all the heads-up on the behind-the-scenes info. You meet great new friends so that you don’t have to be at the conference alone. You can also find someone to share a room and save a little money. There is a “tweet-up” on Friday at 5 pm in the Leader Lounge where you can meet the people behind the Twitter handles. This year we are having a “pre-conference” dinner and there are several that met up last year staying in the same hotel.
  2. Pack comfortable clothes and shoes. Yes, as professionals we often dress nicely, but trust me, you will appreciate the Nikes and jeans. Last year I was away from my hotel room from 7 a.m. until about 11 p.m. I was EXHAUSTED and just missing my comfy clothes. You can learn new information whether you are in a dress or in a pair of jeans! (Besides, if this is your first convention, the exhibit hall is ENORMOUS!)
  3. Bring a backpack. I personally am not a huge fan of the infamous Super Duper bags. Not only do they stink, they are not all that comfortable to haul around. There are so many freebies at ASHA, you definitely need something supportive to carry your stuff. If your backpack is big enough, you can stuff a Super Duper bag into it.
  4. Bring your phone, tablet and your charging cords. No matter how great your battery is, you will more than likely need to charge it at some point during the day. Especially if you are one of those #Slpeeps who tweet throughout the entire convention. There are also chargers you can bring for your phone that you don’t have to plug in during a session. Last year I purchased the iGo Green charger. You plug it in to charge overnight and can use it to charge up to two devices while it’s charging. While you’re sitting in a course, you can plug in your phone (doesn’t have to be an iPhone) and charge it from anywhere in a room. No mad dash for a seat close to an outlet needed. Also, by bringing a tablet, you eliminate the need to haul around pens and notebooks.
  5. The scheduler for ASHA is finally up! So many people are so overwhelmed by the seeming millions of available sessions to attend. I am a very visual person, so I have to do everything a little different for scheduling. I have to make my own calendar, then highlight all the sessions I want to attend and put the session number on the calendar. I then narrow my sessions down to two per time slot. Be sure you select some alternate courses as there are times you get to the convention and some of the courses/posters have been cancelled.
  6. It’s never too early to start packing. The more you plan what you need to take, the more prepared you will be! I personally do much better if I pack early because I will inevitably remember things I need to take later on. Also, the more room you can make in your bag the better. (Remember, the exhibit hall is ENORMOUS and full of wonderful FREE items. You can also purchase many items at a discounted rate!)
  7. Make sure you sign up for all the freebies. The opening party, awards ceremony and closing party are actually a lot of fun. Better yet, they’re also free! You are already spending all that money on registration anyway. The conference also offers a box lunch for a small price (I think $7 a day). It really beats having to fight crowds at restaurants and all the waiting (giving you more time at the exhibit hall). The boxed lunches are pretty decent and quite affordable.
  8. Prepare to have FUN. The ASHA convention is a blast. It takes forever for it to come around every year, but once it starts, the time flies. There is so much to do and so many people to meet. Prepare for one of the greatest  convention experiences of your life!
  9. Don’t forget, leave some time for socializing and the exhibit hall. You won’t regret it. There is an enormous amount of knowledge to learn from all the exhibitors. (Did I mention that many give away free items?)
  10. If you really can’t find a session you want to attend during a certain time period, you can always do poster sessions. Remember you can do six posters for every 90 minute time slot!
  11. Also, I have found the greatest app. If you are attending ASHA with friends, and split up, download Voxer. It turns your phone into a walkietalkie and is available for both the iPhone and Android phones.

For first-timers, the ASHA convention can be very overwhelming, but in the end is definitely worth the exhaustion!

(Tiffani is one of the official ASHA Convention bloggers. These three bloggers were selected to blog about the ASHA Convention in exchange for complimentary registration. Stay tuned for more insights from her and the other bloggers before, during and after convention.)

 

Tiffani Wallace, CCC-SLP, has been an SLP specializing in Dysphagia for over 11 years. Tiffani has been very active in the social media world, creating two Facebook groups, Dysphagia Therapy Group and Dysphagia Therapy Group-Professional Edition. Tiffani is also the co-author of the app Dysphagia2Go, available on iTunes. She is preparing to travel nationally and speak on the topic of Dysphagia. Tiffani writes a blog called Dysphagia Ramblings and is the author of www.dysphagiaramblings.com. She is a five time ACE awardee and recently obtained her BRS-S.

It Really is a “Brave New World” for Speech-Language Pathology!

In 1931, Aldous Huxley’s novel A Brave New World told us a tale of what society in the distant future would look like… a place of advanced technology, new social structures and radical changes in how humanity interacts with each other… sound familiar?

Well, arranging the Georgia Speech-Language Hearing Association’s (GSHA) short course offerings has opened my eyes to how very fast the role of being an SLP is changing from year to year. We are now serving highly diverse populations of multiple nationalities, utilizing technology that just 10 years ago was science fiction and becoming more and more an integrated part of the healthcare community in general. From NICU to hospice, home health care to the public schools, SLPs are involved with communication and swallowing disorders across the lifespan. We are providing these services in a cost effective, evidence based manner that is making real and measurable change in the populations we serve.

It is with this “Brave New World” in mind, that GSHA would like to present to our fellow convention-goers three short course opportunities that are sure to make a positive impact on the clients, patients and students we all serve. ASHA has given the Georgia association the wonderful opportunity to provide ticketed pre-convention and convention related short courses on November 14th and 15th. Please join us on November 14th for-

Barbara Fernandes, M.S., CCC-SLP The iPad and Your Therapy – Apps, Accessories, Accessibility and Features

Jose Galarza, M.A., CCC-SLP Spanish Influenced English: What Every SLP Should Know

and on November 15th for-

Kate Krival, Ph. D. CCC-SLP Anticipation: Neural Bases and Clinical Implications in Swallowing in Adults

Our pre-convention activities on November 14th will include presentations from Barbara Fernandes, M.S, CCC-SLP and Jose Galarza, M.A. CCC-SLP. Barbara (better known as GeekSLP) will be presenting on all things Apple, Ipad and App related. Bring your Ipad and/or Iphone to her presentation and you will leave better understanding how to use it with your respective population. Jose’s presentation will address the needs of monolingual SLPs working with bilingual children in the school setting. Since school SLPs are increasingly faced with the communication needs of Hispanic children, his presentation is especially relevant to the English speaker attempting evaluation and treatment of those children. Barbara and Jose are both experts in their respective areas and will highly impact the attendee in a positive manner.

On November 15th, join GSHA in welcoming Kate Krival, Ph. D., CCC/SLP. Dr. Krival directs the Swallowing Research Lab at Kent State University and she is a Research Investigator in the Head and Neck Neural Interface Lab at Louis Stokes Veterans Administration Medical Center in Cleveland, OH. She is particularly interested in clinical research targeting sensory-based interventions for swallowing disorders in adults with neurogenic dysphagia. If dysphagia is your area of interest, Kate will leave you with tons of evidenced based ideas for use with your patients!

So, Join GSHA and ASHA in facing this Brave New World of ours with the confidence that these courses will keep you informed, up to date and ahead of the curve!!! See you in Atlanta…

 

Edgar V. (Vince) Clark, M. Ed., CCC/SLP, advocates for the importance of state association participation whenever possible. He is currently the GSHA to ASHA Liason for the 2012 convention, current GSHA CEU chair and is a past-president of GSHA. Professionally, he is interested in adult dysphagia, all things technology, and the use of social media for promoting the professions.

 

The ASHA Convention is quickly approaching! If you haven’t already registered, don’t delay–register today! Stay tuned to ASHAsphere in the weeks leading up to the ASHA Convention for posts by the official Convention bloggers–Jeremy LegaspiTiffani Wallace and Katie Millican. Not an official Convention blogger but want to write a post about it for ASHAsphere? No problem! Send posts to Maggie McGary at mmcgary@asha.org and it could be featured here.