New Global Campaign Takes on Noisy Leisure Activities

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Worldwide, the statistics are sobering:

  • 360 million people have disabling hearing loss.
  • 43 million people between the ages of 12–35 years live with disabling hearing loss.
  • Half of all cases of hearing loss are avoidable through primary prevention.

Of course, none of this likely comes as a surprise to ASHA members, particularly audiologists, who are on the front lines of care for people with hearing loss. The good news is that we are going to hear a lot more about this serious health issue with the help of a high-profile group.

Today, on International Ear Care Day, the World Health Organization is elevating the profile of hearing loss—specifically noise-induced hearing loss—by launching a new campaign called Make Listening Safe.

The campaign educates the public about hearing dangers posed by noisy leisure activities and promotes simple prevention strategies. Young people are the focus because an increasing number are experiencing hearing loss. As the creator of the highly successful Listen to Your Buds campaign, WHO asked ASHA experts to advise on Make Listening Safe. A role the association enthusiastically embraced.

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ASHA used Listen to Your Buds to provide an early warning on potential hearing dangers from misuse of personal music players and the need for safe listening. Today, as this technology is nearly ubiquitous, the campaign is going strong on a variety of fronts.

One of ASHA’s most successful ventures is its safe listening concert series. The series educates young children about protecting their ears in a fun, interactive way by bringing innovative musicians and performances to U.S. schools. A new video showcases the most recent concert series, which took place in six Orlando-area schools in conjunction with ASHA’s 2014 convention.

Misuse of personal audio devices is also a key area of focus for Make Listening Safe. According to WHO, among teenagers and young adults aged 12 to 35 years in middle- and high-income countries, nearly 50 percent are exposed to unsafe levels of sound from the use of these devices.

This is one of the new global estimates being released with the launch of Make Listening Safe. In addition to a high-profile unveiling in Geneva, WHO is issuing a variety of materials featuring statistics on the problem’s scope, the hearing loss consequences and action steps that parents, teachers, physicians, managers of noisy venues, manufacturers and governments can take to make listening leisure activities safer.

ASHA asks members to take up the campaign. Here are just a few ideas on how you can get involved:

  • Utilize the WHO’s eye-catching public education materials—including posters, a fact sheet, and an infographic—with peers, patients, friends and loved ones.
  • Engage in grassroots public education, such as sharing statistics and prevention tips on social media or holding a free hearing screening.
  • Approach local media to pitch a story. The campaign’s launch with accompanying statistics is a great news hook. You can tie the story to your local community by highlighting an event your practice is hosting or offer tips for safe listening at local noisy venues (e.g., stadiums, concert venues/clubs). This is also an excellent consumer health story for a television station, particularly because it offers “news you can use” such as easy prevention tips.

The focus on noise-induced hearing loss in young people is not limited to March. While the WHO campaign will be ongoing, ASHA will also poll the public about safe listening practices. Our results will provide more opportunity for outreach during Better Hearing & Speech Month in May and beyond. Stay tuned!

Click here for more information. Questions may be directed to pr@asha.org.

 

Judith L. Page, PhD, CCC-SLP, is ASHA’s new president. She served as program director for Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Kentucky for 17 years and as chair of the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences for 10 years. 

Happy New Year, ASHA Family!

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Happy New Year to my whole ASHA family – those dedicated to helping people achieve “human wholeness!” I am so proud to be part of this profession and believe I was predestined to be an SLP. The first movie I remember seeing in a theater was My Fair Lady. I’ve since become a modern-day Henry Higgins and even have worked with university teaching assistants on accent reduction! I was also a recipient of the care engendered by those in my as-yet-unchosen field when an amazing neurologist and SLP “asked me questions” (a child’s interpretation of diagnostics) and guided my family during my recovery from a head injury significant enough to require last rites in 1971. 

Although a practicing member for more than 25 years, I didn’t attend my first ASHA convention until 2013. I went to update my clinical and research skills, but also to visit school friends from Northwestern who still live in Chicago. I particularly enjoyed the courses presented by a then recent ASHA fellow and complimented her in our hotel elevator. I also asked a question about spring 2014 events. She not only answered my questions, but allowed my family to stay in her family’s home during our visit!

One Chicago friend (an organizational psychologist) was shocked at the friendliness and trust exemplified by even the offer of such hospitality and further astounded when I told her nearly 15,000 people attended the 2013 conference. I explained that ASHA members are friendly, helpful people. That presenter and new acquaintance was no fool, however, she did her due diligence and called my current work ‘family’ to vet my responsibility.  I, in turn, offered her the use of our Orlando lake home as she celebrated being named “Fellow” with her family.

That story shows how I, and many of my peers, view ASHA as a large extended family, which was reinforced by my encounters at the 2014 “Generations of Discovery” convention. Harry Belafonte, along with his daughter and granddaughter, highlighted how family focus has directed their lives. At the awards event, Annie Glenn explained how services such as her 1973 stuttering therapy, “save us from being solitary souls,” while father-son TV journalists the Geists received her “Annie” Award for their communication contributions. Honors of the Association recipient, Nan Bernstein-Ratner, gushed that obtaining the Glenns’ autographs on a photo and copy of  the Geists’ book, The Right Stuff, for her son were her most moving moments of the convention. Voice expert Daniel Boone shared how excited he was that his son and granddaughter were visiting from Tampa. We were saddened by Jeri Logemann’s passing, but her impact is ever present, from the pins at an exhibitor’s display to shared remembrances of a holiday party at her home.

None of us are “solitary souls” and our uniquely human abilities to enjoy conversing and sharing with our families and friends are a testament to the vital work each of us has chosen to undertake. For the new year, I wish my ASHA family wisdom (recalling John Rosenbek’s closing session’s  “Neuroplasticity” message that we “First do no harm”), a wealth of well-wishers (for our world has its woes), and work as we help heal the world in 2015!


Denise Dancull, M.A., CCC-SLP
is a pediatric SLP with more than 25 years experience specializing in cleft palate and cochlear implant services. Please feel free to contact this proud parent, bibliophile and theater fan at denise.dancull@nemours.org.

An Audiologist’s Experiences at Convention

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I have been an audiologist since December 1982 and joined ASHA in January 1983 obtaining my CCC-A in October 1983. During those 31 plus years I’ve attended 11 ASHA national conventions and with the exception of the 2014 event my typical reason for going was to either see a city that I never saw before or to go to a city with a warm November climate.

Yes, in truth, the warmth was also why I went to Orlando! I prepared to spend many a grueling hour at Disney World and other tourist attractions. However, when I registered, I observed that every day of the convention held multiple interesting courses either directly on audiology or concerning issues related to the changing medical environment. What a blast!! Even at 60, I still believe that to learn is to live!

Keep this up ASHA and you will start to see far more audiologists attending your conferences. I truly believe that if the conventions in the past were like the 2014 convention there would never have been the American Academy of Audiology, Academy of Doctors of Audiology or Audiology Foundation of America organizations. These organizations were created because we audiologists felt disenfranchised.

At this year’s convention I didn’t feel left out and believe in giving the “devil his due.” Good job ASHA, keep it up!

 

James M. O’Day, Au.D., CCC-A, is an audiologist managing the audiology department at Androscoggin Valley Hospital in Berlin, NH. where he has worked for ten years. O’Day works directly with ENTs in both private practice and in hospital settings. He’s owned a private practice for more than 20 years. You can contact him at james.oday@avhnh.org.

On the Road Again: ASHA Convention and Telepractice

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I admit it. I am an ASHA convention regular attendee. I am the SLP you see year after year collecting large yellow tote bags, company pens and my new favorite—nail files. This year, I even lined up to have my professional photo taken for my LinkedIn profile. I take in all that the ASHA convention offers, and my schedule allows, year after year.

One reason why the ASHA convention is so important to me is that I rarely stay in one place very long. I am the spouse of an active duty military officer. Therefore, I move a lot. With each move (eight so far), I’ve attended ASHA with a new job title: Department of Defense school SLP, hospital SLP, staff SLP, Lead SLP… This year, I attended ASHA as an SLP that works via telepractice. I deliver services and perform assessments via an online, custom built platform. I’m several states away from my students but I am licensed in the state where they reside and the state in which I reside. Using my home computer(s), a headset, webcam and high-speed internet connection with plenty of bandwidth, I treat, assess and collaborate with other SLPs, school staff and parents daily.

At this year’s convention, I encountered some surprising conversations regarding telepractice. I was met with responses ranging from: “Telepractice. I’m not so sure how I feel about that,” to “Yes, I’ve been looking into doing that. How does it work?” When embarking on a career in telepractice as a service delivery model, I was skeptical too. Was it ethical, effective and authorized? After researching ASHA’s rules and state bylaws, I put my feet in the water. That was four years ago.

During the ASHA convention, I was pleased to attend an increasing number of sessions focused on telepractice. However, these sessions highlighted the work and research still to be done to prove the effectiveness of telepractice as a service delivery model (especially with regards to culturally and linguistically diverse populations).

I still wonder, does an increase in sessions and visibility at the ASHA convention translate to increased acceptance/adoption by SLPs on the ground?

Telepractice is established and has been used in the medical field for more than 40 years. The American Telemedicine Association states that “telemedicine is the use of medical information exchanged from one site to another via electronic communications to improve a patient’s clinical health status. Telemedicine includes a variety of applications including two-way videos, smart phones, tablets, wireless tools and other forms of technology.” According to ATA, “the use of telemedicine has spread rapidly and is now becoming integrated into the ongoing operations of hospitals, specialty departments, home health agencies and private physician offices as well as consumers’ homes and workplaces.”

I am looking forward to next year’s ASHA convention in Denver. I am already wondering about the sessions, networking opportunities and of course the pens and highlighters. Most of all, I’m looking forward to attending ASHA again as a SLP working via telepractice and the discussions that will surely follow.

Lesley Edwards-Gaither , MA, CCC-SLP, is a Speech-Language Pathologist in the Washington D.C. area.  She is a Lead SLP with PresenceLearning and an affiliate of Special Interest Group 18, Telepractice. She can be reached at legaitherslp@gmail.com

 

Why “Why Not?” Is a Worthwhile Attitude

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November 8, 2014: eleven days before the ASHA Convention in Orlando, Florida.

After talking with my CSD professors and mentors about convention and exploring the ASHA website, I knew there was nothing more that I wanted than to attend. My chances of being able to go, however, were slim. After all, it was only a little more than a week away and I hadn’t figured out transportation or housing, much less how to pay for the actual convention.

I noticed the “Student Volunteer” link on the ASHA website, and my eyes lit up. At least until I saw the deadline to apply was two months ago. After a twinge of disappointment, I decided to email the volunteer contact anyway—I figured, “Why not?”

When I got a response back asking if I could work on November 18th from 10 am to 7 pm in exchange for complementary attendance, I practically fell out of my chair. I said yes, and after moving several pieces of the logistics puzzle around, my arrangements were set.

Now that I am fortunate enough to have attended my first ASHA convention, I can say with confidence that it was one of the most eye-opening, inspiring experiences I’ve had. Throughout the week, as I walked from session to session, I often found myself shaking my head in pure astonishment that the whole plan actually came together. The “Why Not?” mentality—grounded in drive, openness and ambition—encourages the pursuit of opportunities that seem beyond reach. Committing to this mindset will not only enable you to “shoot for the stars,” but to land among them.

When approaching your aspirations with a “Why Not?” attitude, here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Communicate in a professional tone. Whether you are writing an email or interacting in person, be mature in your presentation to show that even as a student, you will be able to fit in seamlessly with experienced professionals.
  • Providing too much information is better than too little. This is the part where you make it easy for them to say yes. Emailing to inquire about a volunteer position? Attach a resume before they ask for one. Tell them why you are the best possible fit. Hold nothing back when pursuing an opportunity.
  • Be persistent. Professionals are busy, so don’t take lack of response personally. If you do not hear from anyone after a few days, send a polite follow-up email to ensure that they saw your previous message. Persist also in setting deadlines for yourself. If you say you will do or send something, then follow through.
  • Become comfortable with being uncomfortable. This is one of my life mottos after being an avid gymnast for 14 years and I find it applies to almost every challenge I encounter. Asking yourself “Why not?” forces you to get out of your comfort zone and pursue opportunities not easily attainable. The more you put yourself out there, the better you will become at it.

Pursuing opportunities with the “Why Not?” mentality serves me well in attaining my ultimate goal of becoming an SLP, and affords me a variety of experiences, including the writing of this article. After receiving a hand-out to write for the ASHA Leader at the convention, I chuckled at the idea. When I took out the folded piece of paper from my backpack days later, however, I opened up my laptop, started typing, and thought: “Why not?”

 

Robyn Croft is a third year undergraduate student in the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department at the University of Texas at Austin studying Speech/Language Pathology. She is a Student Clinician at the Michael and Tami Lang Stuttering Institute. She can be reached at robyncroft00@gmail.com.