5 Ways to Raise Awareness of Our Professions for Better Hearing and Speech

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I will always be thankful for a young communication sciences and disorders (CSD) student who propelled me into my chosen career. Like many undergraduates, I spent part of my early college experience in a major that didn’t end up a “good fit.” At the moment I (finally) realized it wasn’t for me, I didn’t have a major to replace it. Fortunately, an acquaintance nudged me in the direction of speech-language pathology. Years later, there still hasn’t been a day I regretted my career choice.

May is Better Hearing and Speech Month. I enjoy seeing the creative things that our colleagues do to promote better communication. This month is also a great opportunity to promote the professions themselves! As ASHA’s membership grows, our ability to respond to communication disorders becomes stronger. This is particularly true as our professions grow in diversity and include a greater variety of perspectives. For this reason, one of the objectives listed in ASHA’s Strategic Pathway to Excellence is to increase the diversity of the association’s membership.

So what can we do to help people become interested in CSD? Many of us work right where these future professionals spend most of their day. Audiologists and speech-language pathologists working in schools enjoy prime opportunities to raise awareness. Those working in clinical or university settings also frequently encounter students, colleagues and even clients seeking advice about their future.

Here are a few ideas for making the most of opportunities for promoting our professions in our work settings:

  • Incorporate a discussion into an intervention activity. “What I want to be when I grow up,” for example, contains a lot of language skills for school-age kids.
  • Volunteer to give a guest presentation on acoustics in your school’s physics class, or on anatomy or physiology in your school’s biology class.
  • Organize or participate in a school career day or university career fair.
  • Relate your field to other activities! I’ve discussed language concepts needed for arithmetic at a school Math Night. AAC and audiometry are great topics for technology fairs.
  • Share information with your school’s guidance counselor or university career center.

ASHA also provides resources for helping us develop a discussion or presentation. These include:

May is a great time to focus on the future of communication sciences and disorders. As we raise awareness of the professions themselves—particularly among individuals from underrepresented communities—we invest in a stronger, more diverse ASHA and many Better Hearing and Speech Months to come.

 

Nate Cornish, MS, CCC-SLP, is a bilingual (English/Spanish) clinician and clinical director for VocoVision and Bilingual Therapies.  He is the professional development manager for ASHA Special Interest Group 18, Telepractice; a member of ASHA’s Multicultural Issues Board; and a past president of ASHA’s Hispanic Caucus. Cornish provides clinical support to monolingual and bilingual telepractitioners around the country. He also organizes and presents at various continuing education events, including an annual symposium on bilingualism.  Nathan.Cornish@Bilingualtherapies.com 

Tots as Young as 2 Use Tablets, and Parents Are Worried, ASHA Survey Finds

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A new ASHA survey of U.S. parents finds significant percentages reporting technology use by very young children. Additionally, more than half of the parents surveyed report feeling concern that technology use could negatively affect their young children’s ability to communicate.

Conducted this past March, the survey polled 1,000 parents of children ages 0 to 8. Its release occurs during May Is Better Hearing and Speech Month, a time for ASHA and its members to raise awareness of speech, language and hearing disorders—and spotlight the importance of communication health.

Although the fact that most children use “smart” technology today may not be surprising, just how early it begins may be. The survey results show that more than two-thirds of the respondents say their 2-year-olds are using tablets, more than half say they use smart phones, and one in four indicate their 2-year-olds are using some form of technology at the dinner table. All of this raises questions about how this tech use will affect children’s communication development.

Some findings from the survey:

  • 55 percent of parents have some degree of concern that misuse of technology may be harming their children’s hearing, and 52 percent have concerns about speech and language skills.
  • 52 percent  say they are concerned that technology negatively affects the quality of their conversations with their children; 54 percent say they are concerned that they have fewer conversations with their children than they would like to because of technology.
  • Parents recognize the potential hearing hazards of personal audio devices: 72 percent agree that loud noise from technology may lead to hearing loss in their children.
  • 24 percent of 2-year-olds use technology at the dinner table. By age 8, that percentage nearly doubles to 45 percent.
  • By age 6, 44 percent of kids would rather play a game on a technology device than read a book or be read to. By age 8, a majority would prefer that technology be present when spending time with a family member or friend.
  • More than half of parents say they use technology to keep kids ages 0 to 3 entertained; nearly 50 percent of parents of children age 8 report they often rely on technology to prevent behavior problems and tantrums.

These results present an opportunity to deliver communication health messages nationally and in our circles of influences and local communities. Earlier this month, ASHA shared the survey results with media around the country via a satellite media tour, and will continue to spread the word this month through social media. ASHA also has created new resources with a technology theme for its Identify the Signs public education campaign.

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Visit www.asha.org/bhsm to find resources you can use to reach out to the media and public in your community. There you will also find the full survey results.

Looking beyond Better Hearing and Speech Month, the summer presents an ideal time to continue to push out these messages. For instance, 55 percent of parents polled in the survey said their children age 8 or younger use technology during car trips. Members could present this statistic and note that this is an ideal time for a family to put the tech devices away and focus on communicating.

We hope members will find such information compelling and useful for building awareness of communication health; speech, language and hearing disorders; and the professionals—certified audiologists and speech-language pathologists—who are best educated and trained to address them.

 

Judith L. Page, PhD, CCC-SLP, is ASHA 2015 president. She served as program director for Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Kentucky for 17 years and as chair of the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences for 10 years. judith.page@uky.edu

Join Us in ‘Speaking Up for Communication’ this May

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Each May, ASHA looks for new, exciting and effective ways to educate the public about communication disorders as part of Better Hearing & Speech Month (BHSM). We’re excited to announce that this year, we’re debuting a new social media platform for members to allow them to easily share BHSM information and build awareness at the grassroots level. Members who sign up for the service will receive two to three emails a week during May with suggested social media posts.

Those who participate by recruiting others and sharing links will be entered to win a range of prizes, including gift cards as well as BHSM and ASHA merchandise. It’s an easy and fun way for you to build awareness and support for your profession. Sign up today to join us in “Speaking Up for Communication.”

There will be plenty of interesting material to post, like the results of a new ASHA national survey. We asked parents of infants through 8-year-olds about their kids’ use of technology. According to those parents, a majority of young children use devices such as smartphones and tablets during critical years for communication development. Stay tuned for the results, which will be announced with a nationwide media tour starting May 8.

Those results will also serve as the basis for a host of different BHSM digital assets—helping ASHA bring the topic of communication to the forefront. Key messages include the importance of talking and interacting with kids in the tech age and establishing safe listening habits early. We expect significant buzz about the survey that should help you capitalize on sharing BHSM and related resources in your work and community.

Of course, if you prefer to spread these key messages in more traditional ways, ASHA will provide press release and media advisory templates. Be sure to visit the BHSM member resource page for these and more.

You’ll also find our free 2015 poster, bookmark, coloring page, and Facebook photo, for example. And you can read about how other members celebrate BHSM by clicking through our “Share Your Stories” map. We’ve already heard from a number of members with great stories for this year!

Make sure to keep checking back, as we’ll be adding details on other BHSM activities, including a 2015 Twitter party and a Listen to Your Buds concert we’re hosting in the nation’s capital.

Finally, remember to showcase your BHSM pride with our 2015 products, which feature the tagline “Early Intervention Counts”—a message worth sharing! Order today!

Francine Pierson is an ASHA public relations manager.

fpierson@asha.org.

 

New Global Campaign Takes on Noisy Leisure Activities

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Worldwide, the statistics are sobering:

  • 360 million people have disabling hearing loss.
  • 43 million people between the ages of 12–35 years live with disabling hearing loss.
  • Half of all cases of hearing loss are avoidable through primary prevention.

Of course, none of this likely comes as a surprise to ASHA members, particularly audiologists, who are on the front lines of care for people with hearing loss. The good news is that we are going to hear a lot more about this serious health issue with the help of a high-profile group.

Today, on International Ear Care Day, the World Health Organization is elevating the profile of hearing loss—specifically noise-induced hearing loss—by launching a new campaign called Make Listening Safe.

The campaign educates the public about hearing dangers posed by noisy leisure activities and promotes simple prevention strategies. Young people are the focus because an increasing number are experiencing hearing loss. As the creator of the highly successful Listen to Your Buds campaign, WHO asked ASHA experts to advise on Make Listening Safe. A role the association enthusiastically embraced.

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ASHA used Listen to Your Buds to provide an early warning on potential hearing dangers from misuse of personal music players and the need for safe listening. Today, as this technology is nearly ubiquitous, the campaign is going strong on a variety of fronts.

One of ASHA’s most successful ventures is its safe listening concert series. The series educates young children about protecting their ears in a fun, interactive way by bringing innovative musicians and performances to U.S. schools. A new video showcases the most recent concert series, which took place in six Orlando-area schools in conjunction with ASHA’s 2014 convention.

Misuse of personal audio devices is also a key area of focus for Make Listening Safe. According to WHO, among teenagers and young adults aged 12 to 35 years in middle- and high-income countries, nearly 50 percent are exposed to unsafe levels of sound from the use of these devices.

This is one of the new global estimates being released with the launch of Make Listening Safe. In addition to a high-profile unveiling in Geneva, WHO is issuing a variety of materials featuring statistics on the problem’s scope, the hearing loss consequences and action steps that parents, teachers, physicians, managers of noisy venues, manufacturers and governments can take to make listening leisure activities safer.

ASHA asks members to take up the campaign. Here are just a few ideas on how you can get involved:

  • Utilize the WHO’s eye-catching public education materials—including posters, a fact sheet, and an infographic—with peers, patients, friends and loved ones.
  • Engage in grassroots public education, such as sharing statistics and prevention tips on social media or holding a free hearing screening.
  • Approach local media to pitch a story. The campaign’s launch with accompanying statistics is a great news hook. You can tie the story to your local community by highlighting an event your practice is hosting or offer tips for safe listening at local noisy venues (e.g., stadiums, concert venues/clubs). This is also an excellent consumer health story for a television station, particularly because it offers “news you can use” such as easy prevention tips.

The focus on noise-induced hearing loss in young people is not limited to March. While the WHO campaign will be ongoing, ASHA will also poll the public about safe listening practices. Our results will provide more opportunity for outreach during Better Hearing & Speech Month in May and beyond. Stay tuned!

Click here for more information. Questions may be directed to pr@asha.org.

 

Judith L. Page, PhD, CCC-SLP, is ASHA’s new president. She served as program director for Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of Kentucky for 17 years and as chair of the Department of Rehabilitation Sciences for 10 years. 

Happy New Year, ASHA Family!

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Happy New Year to my whole ASHA family – those dedicated to helping people achieve “human wholeness!” I am so proud to be part of this profession and believe I was predestined to be an SLP. The first movie I remember seeing in a theater was My Fair Lady. I’ve since become a modern-day Henry Higgins and even have worked with university teaching assistants on accent reduction! I was also a recipient of the care engendered by those in my as-yet-unchosen field when an amazing neurologist and SLP “asked me questions” (a child’s interpretation of diagnostics) and guided my family during my recovery from a head injury significant enough to require last rites in 1971. 

Although a practicing member for more than 25 years, I didn’t attend my first ASHA convention until 2013. I went to update my clinical and research skills, but also to visit school friends from Northwestern who still live in Chicago. I particularly enjoyed the courses presented by a then recent ASHA fellow and complimented her in our hotel elevator. I also asked a question about spring 2014 events. She not only answered my questions, but allowed my family to stay in her family’s home during our visit!

One Chicago friend (an organizational psychologist) was shocked at the friendliness and trust exemplified by even the offer of such hospitality and further astounded when I told her nearly 15,000 people attended the 2013 conference. I explained that ASHA members are friendly, helpful people. That presenter and new acquaintance was no fool, however, she did her due diligence and called my current work ‘family’ to vet my responsibility.  I, in turn, offered her the use of our Orlando lake home as she celebrated being named “Fellow” with her family.

That story shows how I, and many of my peers, view ASHA as a large extended family, which was reinforced by my encounters at the 2014 “Generations of Discovery” convention. Harry Belafonte, along with his daughter and granddaughter, highlighted how family focus has directed their lives. At the awards event, Annie Glenn explained how services such as her 1973 stuttering therapy, “save us from being solitary souls,” while father-son TV journalists the Geists received her “Annie” Award for their communication contributions. Honors of the Association recipient, Nan Bernstein-Ratner, gushed that obtaining the Glenns’ autographs on a photo and copy of  the Geists’ book, The Right Stuff, for her son were her most moving moments of the convention. Voice expert Daniel Boone shared how excited he was that his son and granddaughter were visiting from Tampa. We were saddened by Jeri Logemann’s passing, but her impact is ever present, from the pins at an exhibitor’s display to shared remembrances of a holiday party at her home.

None of us are “solitary souls” and our uniquely human abilities to enjoy conversing and sharing with our families and friends are a testament to the vital work each of us has chosen to undertake. For the new year, I wish my ASHA family wisdom (recalling John Rosenbek’s closing session’s  “Neuroplasticity” message that we “First do no harm”), a wealth of well-wishers (for our world has its woes), and work as we help heal the world in 2015!


Denise Dancull, M.A., CCC-SLP
is a pediatric SLP with more than 25 years experience specializing in cleft palate and cochlear implant services. Please feel free to contact this proud parent, bibliophile and theater fan at denise.dancull@nemours.org.

An Audiologist’s Experiences at Convention

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I have been an audiologist since December 1982 and joined ASHA in January 1983 obtaining my CCC-A in October 1983. During those 31 plus years I’ve attended 11 ASHA national conventions and with the exception of the 2014 event my typical reason for going was to either see a city that I never saw before or to go to a city with a warm November climate.

Yes, in truth, the warmth was also why I went to Orlando! I prepared to spend many a grueling hour at Disney World and other tourist attractions. However, when I registered, I observed that every day of the convention held multiple interesting courses either directly on audiology or concerning issues related to the changing medical environment. What a blast!! Even at 60, I still believe that to learn is to live!

Keep this up ASHA and you will start to see far more audiologists attending your conferences. I truly believe that if the conventions in the past were like the 2014 convention there would never have been the American Academy of Audiology, Academy of Doctors of Audiology or Audiology Foundation of America organizations. These organizations were created because we audiologists felt disenfranchised.

At this year’s convention I didn’t feel left out and believe in giving the “devil his due.” Good job ASHA, keep it up!

 

James M. O’Day, Au.D., CCC-A, is an audiologist managing the audiology department at Androscoggin Valley Hospital in Berlin, NH. where he has worked for ten years. O’Day works directly with ENTs in both private practice and in hospital settings. He’s owned a private practice for more than 20 years. You can contact him at james.oday@avhnh.org.

On the Road Again: ASHA Convention and Telepractice

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I admit it. I am an ASHA convention regular attendee. I am the SLP you see year after year collecting large yellow tote bags, company pens and my new favorite—nail files. This year, I even lined up to have my professional photo taken for my LinkedIn profile. I take in all that the ASHA convention offers, and my schedule allows, year after year.

One reason why the ASHA convention is so important to me is that I rarely stay in one place very long. I am the spouse of an active duty military officer. Therefore, I move a lot. With each move (eight so far), I’ve attended ASHA with a new job title: Department of Defense school SLP, hospital SLP, staff SLP, Lead SLP… This year, I attended ASHA as an SLP that works via telepractice. I deliver services and perform assessments via an online, custom built platform. I’m several states away from my students but I am licensed in the state where they reside and the state in which I reside. Using my home computer(s), a headset, webcam and high-speed internet connection with plenty of bandwidth, I treat, assess and collaborate with other SLPs, school staff and parents daily.

At this year’s convention, I encountered some surprising conversations regarding telepractice. I was met with responses ranging from: “Telepractice. I’m not so sure how I feel about that,” to “Yes, I’ve been looking into doing that. How does it work?” When embarking on a career in telepractice as a service delivery model, I was skeptical too. Was it ethical, effective and authorized? After researching ASHA’s rules and state bylaws, I put my feet in the water. That was four years ago.

During the ASHA convention, I was pleased to attend an increasing number of sessions focused on telepractice. However, these sessions highlighted the work and research still to be done to prove the effectiveness of telepractice as a service delivery model (especially with regards to culturally and linguistically diverse populations).

I still wonder, does an increase in sessions and visibility at the ASHA convention translate to increased acceptance/adoption by SLPs on the ground?

Telepractice is established and has been used in the medical field for more than 40 years. The American Telemedicine Association states that “telemedicine is the use of medical information exchanged from one site to another via electronic communications to improve a patient’s clinical health status. Telemedicine includes a variety of applications including two-way videos, smart phones, tablets, wireless tools and other forms of technology.” According to ATA, “the use of telemedicine has spread rapidly and is now becoming integrated into the ongoing operations of hospitals, specialty departments, home health agencies and private physician offices as well as consumers’ homes and workplaces.”

I am looking forward to next year’s ASHA convention in Denver. I am already wondering about the sessions, networking opportunities and of course the pens and highlighters. Most of all, I’m looking forward to attending ASHA again as a SLP working via telepractice and the discussions that will surely follow.

Lesley Edwards-Gaither , MA, CCC-SLP, is a Speech-Language Pathologist in the Washington D.C. area.  She is a Lead SLP with PresenceLearning and an affiliate of Special Interest Group 18, Telepractice. She can be reached at legaitherslp@gmail.com

 

Tales From Apraxia Boot Camp

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In August of this year, I was selected to be a part of The Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America’s 2014 Intensive Training Institute, otherwise known as “Apraxia Boot Camp.” Twenty-four speech-language pathologists, including myself, trained with three mentors–Ruth Stoeckel, Kathy Jakielski, and Dave Hammer–at Duquesne University over four days. In its third year, the goal of the boot camp is to spread a high level of knowledge about Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) assessment and treatment throughout the United States and Canada. This conference accomplished that and so much more.

This experience was different than any other continuing education seminars that I have attended. We did not listen to speakers discuss CAS. Instead, Ruth, Kathy and Dave became our mentors. This was powerful. They moderated discussions on evaluation and treatment approaches. We reviewed research papers and had long debates on the principles of motor learning. We highlighted and critiqued therapy methods for those brave enough to show videos of themselves. We problem solved and brought up more questions than we knew were possible.

In smaller groups, our mentors provided insights and personal perspectives on how they work. In this intimate setting, we felt comfortable asking questions and sharing our experiences. The mentors shared constructive criticism along with thoughtful suggestions. In all, they made me think, reflect and question everything I do. Why do I give that test? Why do I treat that way? What is the research behind it? They encouraged us to become critical thinkers.

As therapists, we often get used to using the same materials and therapy techniques we learned in graduate school or during our early experiences. Those methods are not always effective with every child we treat nor are they all proven effective with evidence based-research. Specifically, children with CAS require different therapy techniques than other children with articulation or phonological delays.

Ruth, Kathy and Dave provided valuable information in a small, engaging setting. Their mentoring and passion for CAS has inspired me and I hope to pass along this valuable information to others through mentoring, improving my competency in treatment and diagnosis of CAS, and, in the end, helping children to communicate.

Based on my experience, I’d recommend asking yourself a few questions when selecting your next continuing education event:

  • What am I passionate about? Is there a child or an area of speech pathology that truly inspires me?
  • How will it improve my skill set?
  • How will it help me better serve my clients?
  • Who is doing the most current, researched-based evaluation or therapy techniques?
  • How will it further our profession?

 

Amanda Zimmerman, MA, CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in Columbus, OH. She can be reached at azimmerman@columbusspeech.org.

#ASHA14 Audiologist in the House

blogI have been attending the national ASHA convention since 2008 in Chicago, but this year is a special first for me–MY FIRST ASHA CONVENTION AS A CERTIFIED DOCTOR OF AUDIOLOGY!!! I started attending ASHA as undergraduate while still trying to determine if I wanted to study audiology or speech-language pathology. As an undergrad, ASHA was a little overwhelming. The graduate school fair and exhibit halls, as well as the many networking events, were greatly beneficial, but as I still didn’t have a concrete plan or field, my choice in sessions was eclectic and I don’t know how much I got out of them.

The next several years I served on the NSSLHA Executive Council as a delegate for Region 8 and then as a representative for Region 3, and even though I was “at convention” I was very busy with meetings and helping run NSSLHA Day and as such, didn’t get to many sessions. The networking has always continued to be phenomenal and I loved being emcee of the NSSLHA Battle of the Regions Knowledge Bowl, but I was missing out on sessions.

Last year, as a fourth year extern who was free of meeting and other responsibilities, I was finally able to attend as a regular attendee and found some great sessions (which after three-and-a-half years of grad school, I could understand), but this year will even top that as I now have a job as an educational audiologist and can search out sessions related to what I do on a daily basis.

I always look forward to continued networking and social events as well as the exhibit hall. I’ll be sure to check out Audiology Row, the opening plenary session and closing party (Where’s my owl with a letter inviting me to Hogwarts?). As I’ve been researching audiology sessions, I selected so many sessions and posters that were of potential interest that I’ve only got two slots that don’t have conflicting sessions. I’m working on whittling the list down, but there are some sessions I feel I need to catch. Management of School‐Age Children With Hearing Loss: From the Clinic to the Classroom (#1019) is one I feel will be particulary relevant. As I’m learning the ropes at my new job (I’m the only educational audiologist in a rural four-county area of Maryland), I’m rapidly discovering that regular follow-up with dispensing/managing audiologists is not something that always happens with my students due to geographic and socio-economic issues. As such, I’m starting to develop relationships with some of the audiologists at the Children’s Hospital a couple hours away where many students were initially fit.

I’m also looking forward to some sessions and posters on APD as working in the school, it is a “hot topic.” Disentangling Central Auditory Processing (CAP) Test Findings: A Road to Greater Clarity (#1110) , Differential Diagnosis & Intervention of Central Auditory Processing Disorders (#1405), and Treatment Efficacy of the Fast ForWord-Reading Program on Language in a Child With SLI/APD (6036 poster #136).

One final session I’m also very excited about is Noise Exposure & Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Among Rural Adolescents (#1492). The area in which I live and work has agriculture and aquaculture as two significant components of the local economy in addition to many recreational opportunities for noise exposure (hunting, shooting, ATVs, boating, etc) and I feel there will be opportunities to work on implementing some hearing conservation education at the high school level for many of the students I serve.

What are some of the sessions you’re looking forward to? See you in Orlando!

Caleb McNiece, AuD, CCC-A, is a new grad and educational audiologist for the Mid-Shore Special Education Consortium which serves four county school systems on Maryland’s eastern shore. Caleb is a former NSSLHA Executive Council member and is passionate about audiology students, audiology advocacy, pediatric audiology, and private practice.

Cooking up the Perfect ASHA 2014

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What’s the perfect recipe for ASHA 2014? Blend together science, learning and practice. Add a pinch of party and a heaping of gratitude. Watch it grow for generations.

Like many SLP swallowologists, I’m a foodie. Expand that: I’m a bilingual (Spanish-speaking)-Canadian-American-Salsa-dancing-foodie-mama-dysphagia nut, ready for a stimulating convention getaway in Florida. Good thing ASHA has cooked-up a feast for the body and mind.

Coming from Boston, I’ll feel right at home Wednesday night at Minus5º Ice Bar for the ASHA-PAC Party. Drinking a cocktail in a glass made out of ice may make you swallow faster! Watch out! The icy architecture will cool us down as we discuss the latest political action on Capitol Hill.

On Thursday, ASHA promises “hot, hot, hot” at the The ASHFoundation Latin Party at Cuba Libre Restaurant & Rum Bar. After we swallow liquids, we can test solids from the award-winning chef Guillermo Pernot. Salsa lessons anyone?

But of course we won’t just be there to party– relaxing and dancing will help us learn better.

 

Gratitude for opportunities in Science & Learning

I love seeing my heroes at conventions. This year we are deeply saddened to have lost our pioneer in dysphagia, Jerilyn Logemann.

As we remember Logemann, we also need to remember to thank all our mentors. Take time to reflect on how much they have influenced you and your career. Who would I be today without teachers like Jay Rosenbeck, Joanne Robbins, and James Coyle during my master’s studies years ago? Thank you!

And not just mentors who you know directly, but those who are influencing the profession, too. Thank you Catriona Steele, University of Toronto, for pushing us to go global. She suggests an international consensus for diet texture terminology. How many names do we have for that safe-ish dysphagia diet between puree and regular? Here are a few: mechanical soft, ground, moist ground, chopped, mechanically altered…

Thank you Tessa Goldsmith, Partners MGH, for the very important exploration of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). SLPs are public health advocates. Michael Douglas was misdiagnosed three times, delaying his treatment by too many months. He said it started with a sore throat and sore gums behind his last molar. As rates of laryngeal cancer from smoking decline, HPV has emerged as the most common cause of oropharyngeal cancer. However, there are many differences between HPV-positive and HPV-negative cancers. Additionally, don’t miss a chance to see Katherine Hutcheson, of MD Anderson, who gave a fabulous series at the ASHA Healthcare & Business Institute this past April. Jeri Logemann co-authored a two-part series on Long-Term Dysphagia After Head & Neck Cancer. Thank you to her team for carrying the torch.

I appreciate how Dr James Coyle is like Socrates, probing with critical questions to seek the truth. His courses ask: Which side is up?; What’s wrong with my patient?; What are we doing and why?; and what can bedside swallowing examinations do and what can’t they do? Every SLP practicing in dysphagia has to take at least one of his courses. We will learn a lot of science that directly relates to our practice, while having fun! I try to capture his humor in my blogs.

Another thank you to the twilight session on Thursday, called “Eating is Not Just Swallowing.” Samantha Shune, University of Iowa, integrates “components of the broader mealtime process with our definition of swallowing.” I typically introduce my bedside swallowing evaluations with: “Your doctor wants me to evaluate your eating and swallowing.” However, I was once told at an old job to not say “eating,” because it was deemed unrelated to swallowing and swallowing impairment. I appreciate this session’s holistic perspective.

 

Generations of Discovery

ASHA conventions inspire growth. I have discovered that you can recreate your career at any age. After performing Modified Barium Swallow Studies for 15 years, I am beginning again in an extensive FEES training program.

This past April at the ASHA Healthcare & Business Institute, a group of us were sharing our dreams and goals for our careers. I realized that I love to constantly learn, synthesize, and share with others. One year ago, I never would have believed that I would start a dysphagia resource website and become an SLP blogger.

As us older generations teach the younger generations, we also need to thank the younger SLPs for inspiring us to keep it fresh. For me that meant finally embracing technology. It is technology that is helping ASHA members network and reach all corners of the globe.

Thank you, ASHA, for this feast!

 

Karen Sheffler, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1995. Karen has enjoyed medical speech pathology for 20 years. She is a member of the Dysphagia Research Society and the Special Interest Group 13: Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders. Karen obtained her BCS-S (Board Certified Specialist in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders) in August of 2012. She has lectured on dysphagia in the hospital setting, to dental students at the Tufts University Dental School, and on Lateral Medullary Syndrome at the 2011 ASHA convention. Special interests include neurological conditions, geriatrics, oral hygiene, and patient safety/risk management. Karen continues to work in acute care and is a consultant for SEC Medical. She started the website and blog www.SwallowStudy.com in May 2014. She has blog posts on ASHAsphere and www.DysphagiaCafe.com. Sheffler is one of four invited bloggers for ASHA’s 2014 Convention in Orlando.