Why “Why Not?” Is a Worthwhile Attitude

Why Not?

November 8, 2014: eleven days before the ASHA Convention in Orlando, Florida.

After talking with my CSD professors and mentors about convention and exploring the ASHA website, I knew there was nothing more that I wanted than to attend. My chances of being able to go, however, were slim. After all, it was only a little more than a week away and I hadn’t figured out transportation or housing, much less how to pay for the actual convention.

I noticed the “Student Volunteer” link on the ASHA website, and my eyes lit up. At least until I saw the deadline to apply was two months ago. After a twinge of disappointment, I decided to email the volunteer contact anyway—I figured, “Why not?”

When I got a response back asking if I could work on November 18th from 10 am to 7 pm in exchange for complementary attendance, I practically fell out of my chair. I said yes, and after moving several pieces of the logistics puzzle around, my arrangements were set.

Now that I am fortunate enough to have attended my first ASHA convention, I can say with confidence that it was one of the most eye-opening, inspiring experiences I’ve had. Throughout the week, as I walked from session to session, I often found myself shaking my head in pure astonishment that the whole plan actually came together. The “Why Not?” mentality—grounded in drive, openness and ambition—encourages the pursuit of opportunities that seem beyond reach. Committing to this mindset will not only enable you to “shoot for the stars,” but to land among them.

When approaching your aspirations with a “Why Not?” attitude, here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Communicate in a professional tone. Whether you are writing an email or interacting in person, be mature in your presentation to show that even as a student, you will be able to fit in seamlessly with experienced professionals.
  • Providing too much information is better than too little. This is the part where you make it easy for them to say yes. Emailing to inquire about a volunteer position? Attach a resume before they ask for one. Tell them why you are the best possible fit. Hold nothing back when pursuing an opportunity.
  • Be persistent. Professionals are busy, so don’t take lack of response personally. If you do not hear from anyone after a few days, send a polite follow-up email to ensure that they saw your previous message. Persist also in setting deadlines for yourself. If you say you will do or send something, then follow through.
  • Become comfortable with being uncomfortable. This is one of my life mottos after being an avid gymnast for 14 years and I find it applies to almost every challenge I encounter. Asking yourself “Why not?” forces you to get out of your comfort zone and pursue opportunities not easily attainable. The more you put yourself out there, the better you will become at it.

Pursuing opportunities with the “Why Not?” mentality serves me well in attaining my ultimate goal of becoming an SLP, and affords me a variety of experiences, including the writing of this article. After receiving a hand-out to write for the ASHA Leader at the convention, I chuckled at the idea. When I took out the folded piece of paper from my backpack days later, however, I opened up my laptop, started typing, and thought: “Why not?”

 

Robyn Croft is a third year undergraduate student in the Communication Sciences and Disorders Department at the University of Texas at Austin studying Speech/Language Pathology. She is a Student Clinician at the Michael and Tami Lang Stuttering Institute. She can be reached at robyncroft00@gmail.com.

Tales From Apraxia Boot Camp

bootcamp
In August of this year, I was selected to be a part of The Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America’s 2014 Intensive Training Institute, otherwise known as “Apraxia Boot Camp.” Twenty-four speech-language pathologists, including myself, trained with three mentors–Ruth Stoeckel, Kathy Jakielski, and Dave Hammer–at Duquesne University over four days. In its third year, the goal of the boot camp is to spread a high level of knowledge about Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS) assessment and treatment throughout the United States and Canada. This conference accomplished that and so much more.

This experience was different than any other continuing education seminars that I have attended. We did not listen to speakers discuss CAS. Instead, Ruth, Kathy and Dave became our mentors. This was powerful. They moderated discussions on evaluation and treatment approaches. We reviewed research papers and had long debates on the principles of motor learning. We highlighted and critiqued therapy methods for those brave enough to show videos of themselves. We problem solved and brought up more questions than we knew were possible.

In smaller groups, our mentors provided insights and personal perspectives on how they work. In this intimate setting, we felt comfortable asking questions and sharing our experiences. The mentors shared constructive criticism along with thoughtful suggestions. In all, they made me think, reflect and question everything I do. Why do I give that test? Why do I treat that way? What is the research behind it? They encouraged us to become critical thinkers.

As therapists, we often get used to using the same materials and therapy techniques we learned in graduate school or during our early experiences. Those methods are not always effective with every child we treat nor are they all proven effective with evidence based-research. Specifically, children with CAS require different therapy techniques than other children with articulation or phonological delays.

Ruth, Kathy and Dave provided valuable information in a small, engaging setting. Their mentoring and passion for CAS has inspired me and I hope to pass along this valuable information to others through mentoring, improving my competency in treatment and diagnosis of CAS, and, in the end, helping children to communicate.

Based on my experience, I’d recommend asking yourself a few questions when selecting your next continuing education event:

  • What am I passionate about? Is there a child or an area of speech pathology that truly inspires me?
  • How will it improve my skill set?
  • How will it help me better serve my clients?
  • Who is doing the most current, researched-based evaluation or therapy techniques?
  • How will it further our profession?

 

Amanda Zimmerman, MA, CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in Columbus, OH. She can be reached at azimmerman@columbusspeech.org.

CFY (Coming For You)!

stage

I’m a big fan of musical theater (I was so excited Jessie Mueller won a Tony this year.  She was wonderful.). I’m in awe of the performers who seem to sing, dance and act with equal aplomb.  And then they go out and do it in front of a live audience.  Every day.  Twice on Wednesday and Saturday. Where do they find the endurance?

Well, baby, I’ve got news for you.  You’re about to star in your own show.

There is no denying the difficulty of grad school. You’re taking classes in everything, even the stuff that might not be your cup of tea.  Ideally, your clinical fellowship year is in an area you particularly enjoy and the everyday implementation of book learned skills will certainly give you many ah-ha moments. What can be difficult is the frequent observation, knowing, or maybe not knowing, that someone is on the other side of that two way mirror.  There is a feeling of being constantly “on.”  Even paperwork remains a performance. I would drop into bed at night, completely spent.

I actually had two CFY experiences.  The first was my dream job. I was a preschool therapist in a local school system and my job included home visits/evaluations, lessons within the preschool handicap classroom, individual pull-out therapy for many of those same kids, other children that came only for speech, and screenings–lots and lots of screenings.  I’d been working at my school practicum the previous spring in the same location so I knew the staff, some of the kids and had a relationship with my supervisor.

Then life intervened.  My husband and I married in early August which gave us time to honeymoon before the first day of school.  But as the saying goes, “the best laid plans of mice and men….”  Within the first month my husband was transferred to Atlanta, a five to six hour drive from where we were living, and needed to move immediately.  I gave notice that I would leave at the Christmas holiday, started packing our wedding gifts and began to look for a new placement.  (Yes, my husband left a couple months before I did.  Not an auspicious start to married life, but we made it work.)

My second placement was equally as dreamy–out-patient rehab for a large children’s hospital with lots of experienced therapists, including OT and PT, to learn from and watch. The experience I gained there truly shaped the clinician I am today.  So much so, that if I were to give one bit of advice to a new therapist starting out it would be to work where you have lots of interaction with more experienced clinicians. I know you’re sick of being watched, guided, and yearn to start doing your own thing, but…for me, it was the best possible thing that could have happened. (This is where I spent two years exhausted.  I was finally starting to get my feet under me, doing some mentoring myself, and feeling less stressed by the whole process when, guess what, transferred again.)

I share this because I think we get so close to a situation we aren’t seeing it anymore. My situation was unique, but these things come up for lots of reasons.  Sometimes CFYs take place in more than one location or setting.  There might be a short “pause” right in the middle. It’s ok.  Show close and new ones open.  Break a leg!

 

Kim Lewis is a pediatric clinician in Greensboro, NC and blogs atActivityTailor.com.  Attendance at the ASHA convention this fall qualified her for an ACE award (7.0+ CEUs in a 36 month period).

 

In Appreciation: Jeri Logemann

In Appreciation II

Jerilyn (Jeri) Logemann, ASHA 1994 and 2000 president and a world-renowned researcher in speech-language pathology, died at age 72 on June 19, 2014, in her home surrounded by friends.
Logemann_web

After obtaining her bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees from Northwestern University, Logemann joined the faculty and became one of the most influential leaders in her field. A prolific scholar, she contributed groundbreaking books, journal articles, workshops, conference presentations and seminars on the management of voice disorders, normal swallowing physiology, and the assessment and treatment of speech and swallowing in patients with head and neck cancer and those with neurological impairments.

Logemann was the Ralph and Jean Sundin professor of communication sciences and disorders at Northwestern University, and professor of otolaryngology and neurology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, where she directed the Voice, Speech and Language Service and Swallowing Center.

A pioneer in the development of techniques for effective assessment and treatment of speech and swallowing disorders, she—with Hilda Fisher—developed the Fisher-Logemann Test of Articulation Competence, and she developed the modified barium swallow test. Regarded as the leading authority in swallowing disorders, her research was continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health and other agencies for more than 30 years. Always concerned with improving speech-language pathology clinical service, Logemann formed the Clinical Sciences and Disorders Clinical Trials Research Group in 1995 to assist in the design and conduct of large-scale treatment studies of speech, language, learning, voice, swallowing, hearing and balance disorders.

Logemann was a Fellow of ASHA and the Chicago Medical Society, and received ASHA Honors, the association’s highest award. She served the university as chair of the department, and twice as chair of the Northwestern University Faculty.

Logemann’s relentless passion and commitment to her work; skilled leadership; inventive, indomitable and optimistic spirit despite relentless physical challenges; and her loyalty and generosity will be sorely missed by her patients, students, friends and colleagues.

She is survived by her cousin, Ruth Fruland, of Sheridan, Ill.

Gifts in her memory can be made to the Communication Sciences and Disorders Clinical Trials Research Group:

David Lilienfeld, Treasurer
CSDRG
13412 Pantera Road
San Diego, CA 92130-1022

Checks should be made payable to CSDRG. Should you wish to receive a tax deductible receipt, please indicate your return address.

Tanya M. Gallagher, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

“In Appreciation” is an occasional ASHASphere feature highlighting the lives and accomplishments of leaders in communication sciences and disorders.

In Appreciation: Glenda J. Ochsner

In Appreciation II

Glenda J. Ochsner, 2003 ASHA president, died May 29, 2014, at age 72.

Ochsner_web

An Oklahoma native, Glenda earned her bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees at the University of Oklahoma. A speech-language pathologist, she started her long career in academics at the University of North Texas (Denton) in 1968.

Glenda returned to Oklahoma in 1969 to accept a position in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the John W. Keys Speech and Hearing Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, where she taught for the next 25 years and served asdepartment chair from 1987 to 1994. She then served as dean of health, social sciences and human behavior at Oklahoma City Community College (1994–1998). She began teaching in the Honors College in 1996 and the College of Liberal Studies in 2001 at the University of Oklahoma Norman Campus, and continued to serve both programs until her death.

Glenda received numerous teaching awards, including the prestigious David Ross Boyd Professorship, given to recognize teaching excellence at the University of Oklahoma. Her classes were widely sought by students on both the Norman and Health Sciences Center campuses.

Her teaching skills were not limited to the formal classroom. She served for more than a decade as coordinator of interdisciplinary diagnostic and treatment planning teams dealing with orofacial anomalies and language development on the Health Sciences Center campus, which have served as models for similar teams.

Despite demanding teaching and clinical service commitments, Glenda was active in research and in the training of student researchers. During her tenure at the university, she directed doctoral dissertations, numerous master’s theses and senior papers, and served on many planning and examining committees. In addition, she has mentored doctoral students who have participated with her in ongoing research projects, many of which have been grant-supported.

A consummate professional, Glenda served on major committees and boards relating to training and provision of services to people with communication disorders at both the federal and state levels. She was a leader in the profession, serving as president of the Oklahoma Speech-Language-Hearing Association and as president of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in 2003. Her dedication to high standards is shown in her service as chair of the Oklahoma Board of Examiners for Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology.

Glenda’s ability to attract federal and private support for the department programs in communication sciences and disorders contributed materially to their rise in national standing, enabling the university to compete with other programs for high-quality students and provide access to emerging technology.

Throughout her long career, Glenda had a strong commitment to quality patient care. She gave her support to the first licensing law in speech-language pathology and audiology in Oklahoma. She was appointed to chair that board and was regarded as highly effective in her term. Glenda Ochsner’s expertise and dedication is a testament to the high quality of leadership she gave to the profession.

Glenda also was a strong supporter of the arts, so much so that she earned a second master’s degree in 2005 in theatre and museum management to become better equipped to serve her community. She expended much time and energy working with and providing financial backing to various fine arts and performing arts groups in Yukon, Okla.

Survivors include her mother, Mary Jane Ochsner; life partner, James G. Schmaelzle of Yukon, Okla.; adopted son, Ryan B. Tigner of Yukon, Okla.; cousins; and a host of colleagues and friends.

James G. Schmaelzle, MCD, CCC-A is an audiologist in Yukon, Okla.

jims@flash.net

 

“In Appreciation” is an occasional ASHASphere feature highlighting the lives and accomplishments of leaders in communication sciences and disorders.

Bridging the Divide Between EBP and Practice

becky blog

How well does your program integrate clinical practice and research education? It’s a question definitely worth asking. Today, clinicians are expected to use evidence-based practice in all of their clinical encounters, but does it ever seem as though research evidence is pulling clinicians in one direction while clinical experience is pulling the other way?

EBP requires you to consider current best research evidence, clinical expertise, and patient perspectives in your clinical decision-making. Clinicians who did not receive a proper balance and integration of research and clinical practice in their graduate classes may be feeling thinly stretched to meet these demands. In an ASHA survey fielded in 2011, 24 percent of respondents indicated that EBP created unrealistic demands on clinicians.  CSD programs need to provide students with the knowledge and tools to evaluate and apply research. Additionally, faculty members need to think about how well they model a fusion of research and clinical practice in their own teaching.

Some help

To help, ASHA has updated a tool, the Academic Program Self-Assessment: Quality Indicators for Integrating Research and Clinical Practice in Communication Sciences and Disorders (CSD) Programs. The Quality Indicators (QIs) were developed originally in 2007 and were updated in 2014. They can act as a tool to stimulate discussion among academic and clinical faculty members and students about the program’s strengths and needs in integrating clinical practice and research education. The QIs are divided into five sections:

1) Curriculum and Department Goals

2) Course Work

3) Faculty

4) Students

5) Clinical Practica

They are designed to be flexible in their application–some programs may choose to formally survey a broad group of faculty and students using the tool, while others may choose to use the QIs to guide discussion during a faculty meeting.

A test drive, if you will

Beginning in November of 2013, ASHA asked several academic programs to try out the updated QIs and report back on how they used the tool. Here’s what they said…

It took most responders about one hour to complete the QIs, and most programs judged the length, appropriateness, and comprehensiveness of the tool to be “good.” Most of the programs (82 percent, 9/11) had academic faculty, clinical faculty, and the program director/administrator complete the QIs individually and then discussed the results in a meeting. Alternatively, one program provided time for faculty members to complete the QIs during a faculty meeting rather than asking that the QIs be completed on their own time. A few programs (27 percent, 3/11) also included students in the process.

A handful of challenges also were reported. Some faculty members did not have time to complete the QIs, and some students and faculty were not familiar enough with certain aspects of the department to respond to all items. ASHA is currently working to address these challenges; for example, revising the QIs to include a “Don’t know” response option and providing additional online resources.

The QIs did reveal areas of need and areas of poor knowledge exchange between clinical and academic faculty for some pilot programs. Roughly half of the pilot programs used the QIs to develop department goals for further integration of research and clinical practice. Southern Connecticut State University developed and shared with us three of their goals:

  1. To provide opportunities for discussion of contemporary research and clinical topics, faculty will rotate presenting their research and related topics to faculty/staff/students each semester.
  2. The department curriculum committee (DCC) will conduct annual reviews to ensure that EBP concepts are included in syllabi in accordance with the department mission and vision.
  3. NSSLHA will host monthly meetings to discuss research topics of interest.

Jayne Brandel of Fort Hays State University stated that following completion of the QIs, “We are reviewing our curriculum at the undergraduate and graduate level. In addition, we are exploring new clinical opportunities and having clinical instructors participate in courses.”

ASHA plans to follow up with several of the participating CSD programs after 6 to8 months to gain more insight into the longer-term role of the QIs for these programs.

Whether you are a program director, faculty member, or student, the QIs are a great resource to check out to get your program thinking about and talking about the integration of research and clinical practice. It is imperative that new clinicians are adequately prepared for the changing healthcare landscape with knowledge and application of EBP as soon as they enter the workforce. Thus, Academic programs need to be focused on both providing and modeling the foundations of EBP consistently throughout CSD education. The QIs are freely available for download.

 

Rebecca Venediktov, MS, CCC-SLP, is a Clinical Research Associate for ASHA. 

 

Seven Lessons for Newly-Minted SLPs

graduation

It’s graduation season and I can’t help but notice all of the brand new speech-language pathologists coming out of graduate programs across the country. What’s more is that I can’t help but be so happy for them! Here’s why: It seems as if it was just yesterday that I was a free spirited sophomore who decided to take a random class in phonetics. Little did I know this class would influence my life’s work. The class was taught by a young Ph.D., Gloria Weddington, who helped to focus me and, much to my mother’s delight, give me a purpose.

As a senior, Dr. Weddington took me to my first ASHA Convention where she introduced me to all the leaders in our profession.  What impressed me most was how well liked and respected she was by everyone. She would introduce me to her colleagues  as her “little student”  who was going to be a great addition to our profession.  She believed in me and I believed in myself. Once I received my master’s degree, I was ready to set the world on fire!

I vividly remember my first experience as an itinerant SLP in Los Angeles Unified School District. I was so eager and excited to have my first real job with my first real paycheck. I loved my schools and my kids and had a great master teacher who served as my CF supervisor.  I enjoyed my work and continued to grow seizing every new opportunity that came my way.  I absolutely loved my job! A few years later I left my very secure job to strike out on my own and opened a small private practice. I was the secretary, the receptionist, and the SLP,  but most importantly, I was happy again.  That was 35 years ago and I have never looked back.  In fact, I discovered another side of myself, that as an entrepreneur who was able to develop and sustain a thriving private practice in Los Angeles.

Today, many of my friends and colleagues are happily retiring. I have to admit, I feel a little conflicted when I think of what it must be like to wake up each morning and to not having any professional responsibilities.  However, I also can’t imagine life without my professional responsibilities, especially since there is so much more for me to do. The truth of the matter is that I feel as passionate today about our esteemed profession as I did when I was 24.

Young staff often ask me what’s my secret?  It’s no secret–it’s living and learning from life’s experiences. I am approaching 40 years “young” in our great profession and here are seven lessons learned along the way that continue to feed my spirit and nourish my soul:

  1.  Find a role model, a hero whom you admire, respect and trust. Listen, watch, and learn from him or her. If you are lucky they will be your mentor.
  2. Make your CF year count. Get the clinical supervision and support that you need to grow strong and healthy in our profession.
  3.  Be willing to rebuild your dreams.  Protect the joy and excitement that you experienced upon entering the profession. Remember there are no victims, just volunteers.
  4. Continue to grow, learn, and maintain high standards.  Make it a priority to attend ASHA conventions or at the very least your state conferences.  Learning is critical in our ever-changing profession
  5. Keep plenty of mirrors around.  Look closely at whether the person you see is the person you really want to see.  And, when in doubt refer to our ASHA Code of Ethics.
  6. Don’t burn bridges. You never know who you will need to give you that last cup of water.
  7. Have fun.  There is always work to be done!

Congratulations and welcome to our great profession!

Pamela Wiley-Wells, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is the president of the Los Angeles Speech and Language Therapy Center, Inc. and the founder of The Wiley Center, a 501 (c)(3) organization dedicated to providing direct services and support to children with autism spectrum disorders or other developmental disabilities. The practice includes early intervention programs located in South Gate, Lawndale, Los Angeles, and Culver City as well as two satellite speech therapy clinics in Studio City and Downey. Wiley is a frequent lecturer on how to effectively deliver services to the increasing number of children diagnosed with ASDs who have social cognitive deficits.  She has written several professional articles and has co-authored two therapy workbooks; Autism: Attacking Social Interaction Problems for children 4-9 and 10-12 years of age as well as a separate parent resource guide available in English and Spanish. You can follow her private practice on Facebook.

 

Are You Ready for Better Speech and Hearing Month?

bhsm

Better Hearing and Speech Month is a mere week away, and ASHA is gearing up for an exciting month! By now, we hope you’ve seen some of the resources we developed specifically for members—press release and media advisory templates, our 2014 poster, a Facebook cover photo, a letter to parents, our 2014 product line, and much more. We also encourage members to utilize the Identify the Signs member toolkit during May, as the campaign will be front and center for this year’s BHSM. The campaign’s message of early detection is a great tie-in to the 2014 BHSM theme of “Communication disorders are treatable.”

If you’re still looking for ideas on ways to celebrate, it’s not too late to plan something. We’ve got a list of suggestions here, and you can check out our new interactive map featuring stories of how your fellow ASHA members have recognized the month.

If you do have a fabulous event or activity in store, we want to see it! Take a photo and post to Instagram with the hashtag #BHSM. One winner will be randomly selected to receive a package of 2014 BHSM products. More details can be found on the BHSM member resource page. The contest will run from May 1st – 12th.

In addition to member resources and contests, ASHA will be conducting a lot of public outreach during the month to raise the profile of communication disorders and the role of ASHA members in treating them. Some highlights this May include:

  • Google Hangout—A live, online Google Hangout to mark BHSM will be held on May 6th from 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. ET. Moderated by ASHA CEO Arlene Pietranton, the event will convene experts from a wide range of backgrounds to discuss the critical role that communication plays in daily life—and the importance of early detection of any speech, language, or hearing difficulties in children to allow them to reach their full potential academically and socially. Guests will include Elizabeth McCrea, ASHA’s 2014 President; Libby Doggett, deputy assistant secretary for policy and early learning at the U.S. Department of Education; Sara Weinkauf, an autism expert from Easter Seals North Texas; Patti Martin, an ASHA-certified audiologist from Arkansas Children Hospital; and Perry Flynn, an ASHA-certified speech-language pathologist at the University of North Carolina – Greensboro. The panel will take questions from the public, and members are encouraged to participate. Questions can be posted to ASHA’s Google+ page, or use the hashtag #BHSM on Twitter. You can RSVP for the event here.
  • Twitter Party—A Twitter party hosted by lifestyle technology and parenting blogger Michele McGraw (@scrappinmichele), and co-hosted by five other leading parenting bloggers, will be held on May 20th from 12 – 1 p.m. ET. During the party, parents and other interested parties will have the opportunity to learn, and ask and answer questions, about speech, language, and hearing disorders. No RSVP is required; members who are interested in joining in should just follow the hashtag #BHSMChat at that time.
  • New Infographic—A new infographic illustrating the prevalence and cost of communication disorders, as well as the benefits of early intervention, will be posted online at www.asha.org/bhsm and http://IdentifytheSigns.org, and distributed widely to traditional and new media.
  • Podcast Series—Four new topical podcasts featuring ASHA members will be rolled out weekly during the month. These are: Newborn Hearing Screening—In the Hospital and Beyond (May 1); Noise-Induced Hearing Loss in Children: A Preventable Problem (May 12); Autism Diagnosis and Treatment of Today and Tomorrow (May 19); and Building Language and Literacy Skills During the Lazy Days of Summer (May 27). These will be available at http://IdentifytheSigns.org.
  • International Communication Project 2014—During May, ASHA is going to be disseminating digital messaging that relates to the International Communication Project 2014 that was launched earlier this year—and promoting signatories to the Universal Declaration of Communication Rights. Members are encouraged to sign the Declaration and invite others to do so to show their support for people with communication disorders. Watch the February Google Hangout to learn more and hear from the participating countries.

 

Many of these resources won’t be available until May 1 or later, when they are debuted to the public. We encourage you to visit our member resource page www.asha.org/bhsm frequently to see the latest, and hope you can share the information with your networks. These resources will also be posted to http://ldentifytheSigns.org, the home of the Identify the Signs campaign and a site designed for consumers to easily find information tailored to them.

We hope this year’s BHSM will be one of the best yet, and look forward to hearing how you’re celebrating the month. Send us any stories, questions, or comments to bhsm@asha.org.

 

Francine Pierson is the public relations manager at ASHA. She can be reached at fpierson@asha.org.

How to Begin or Reignite Your Career in Schools

school

One of the best things about being a speech-language pathologist is the variety of work settings to choose from. Holding the CCC affords SLPs the flexibility to carve out a niche many settings such as schools, hospitals, skilled nursing facilities; private practice, academia and corporate.  You can reinvent yourself just by changing where you work.

As an SLP who has worked in many settings.  I can attest to the value of change and honing new skills. However, change is always easier when you’re equipped with the right information.

If you’re making a change to schools, here are ten things to know to help you get started:

  1. The federal IDEA law and regulations governs special education and related services to all children with disabilities. This includes children with speech and communication disorders. It is important to understand the law and regulations in order to follow the special education process in schools.
  2. IDEA requires that all students who receive special education have an Individual Education Program or IEP. The IEP is the blueprint for the services that each child receives and should include a statement of the child’s present level of performance, measurable annual goals, including academic and functional goals that will help the child to benefit from the educational curriculum.
  3. It’s important to know that there are qualifications for eligibility for speech language services in schools. Check with your local district or state for guidelines outlining eligibility criteria for speech-language services.
  4. Service delivery in schools is typically conducted through individual or small group sessions, and/or  in collaboration with teachers and other education professionals. Tracking goals and collecting data for multiple students in one session is accomplished with preplanning and organization. It is important to develop a method of tracking data for each student goal in order to report progress throughout the year.
  5. The average student Caseload  across the country is 47 according the 2012 Schools Survey. That number will fluctuate throughout the school year. Scheduling and service delivery are key to managing your caseload.
  6. Response to Intervention (RTI) is a process in which struggling students are provided with alternative interventions in areas of need to determine if their performance is due learning difficulties or faulty instruction. Some schools fully embrace the RTI model while others do not. IDEA allows for RTI but does not require it.  SLPs often play a role in the RTI process in their schools.
  7. The Common Core State Standards have been adopted by 45 states thus far and is an initiative to prepare students for college programs or to enter the workforce.  The standards include the areas of reading, writing, speaking and listening, language and mathematics. SLPs should be familiar with the standards in their state to develop IEP goals that complement and integrate the Common Core curriculum for the students they serve.
  8. Speech-language pathology assistants (SLPAs) typically work in the school setting under the supervision of an SLP. The scope of practice for an SLPA is narrower than that of an SLP and is designed to support, not supplant the work of the SLP. ASHA recommends that SLPs supervise no more than 2 SLPAs at a time.
  9. SLPs in schools may be subject to state teacher requirements. ASHA’s state by state webpage outlines teaching requirements from each state across the country. Learn in advance what you’ll need to work in the public schools in your state.
  10. Salaries in schools vary widely across the country. ASHA’s 2012 School Survey provides salary data for public school SLPs in every state. Opportunities to earn additional income may be available by working in after school and summer school programs. Salary supplements may be available to SLPs who hold CCC credential.  Schools also offer excellent retirement plans, health benefits and favorable schedules.  Read more about the rewards of working in schools.

Of course, there’s much more to school based practice than just these ten points, but it’s a start.  ASHA is committed to serving school based SLPs by offering clinical and professional resources as well as professional development opportunities. One of the most popular professional development events is ASHA’s annual  Schools Conference. The Conference features the best speakers in the field on a variety of topics.  In fact, early bird registration is open now!
These resources and opportunities for learning will help to make your transition to schools a smooth one.  If you’d like to connect with us about school based practice, please contact us: schools@asha.org. We’d love to hear from you.

 

Lisa Rai Mabry-Price M.S. CCC-SLP, is the associate director of School Services for ASHA. She can be reached at lmabry-price@asha.org.

Beyond Skype for Online Therapy: Protecting Student Privacy

Privacy

 

The trend for kids online is sharing more, not less. Today’s kids consciously and unconsciously share so many aspects of their life using Facebook, Skype or even newer tech tools like Snapchat. But, as educators, we hold ourselves to a much higher legal and professional standard for protecting the information of these very same students. We’ve all heard about the laws—FERPA, HIPAA, COPPA— that set the standards for privacy of student records and personally identifiable information, but what do the laws mean in the context of delivering speech-language therapy online?

HIPAA: Protecting Individually Identifiable Health Information

Created by the Department of Health and Human Services in 1996, The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is a federal law that protects patient medical records. HIPAA specifically protects “individually identifiable health information,” which includes:

  • the individual’s name, address, birth date and Social Security number.
  • the individual’s past, present or future physical or mental health or condition.
  • the provision of health care to the individual.
  • the past, present or future payment for the provision of health care to the individual.

HIPAA gives patients a variety of rights regarding individually identifiable health information. With consent, HIPAA permits the disclosure of health information needed for patient care, such as speech therapy.

FERPA: Protecting Education Records

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is a federal law that protects student education records. FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children’s education records until they turn 18 or transfer to a school higher than the high school level, thus making them “eligible students.” The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education. Under FERPA, parents or eligible students have the right to:

  • Inspect and review the student’s education records.
  • Request a school to correct records they believe to be inaccurate or misleading.
  • Prevent a school from releasing information from the student’s education record without written permission (with some exceptions).

COPPA: Protecting Children’s Personal Information

The Federal Trade Commission instituted COPPA (Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act) in April, 2000 to protect children’s personal information on websites and applications that target children under the age of 13. Under the legislation, websites and apps that collect this information must notify parents directly and get their approval prior to the collection, use or disclosure of a child’s personal information. The FTC describes personal information as:

  • A child’s name, contact information (address, phone number or email address.
  • A child’s physical whereabouts.
  • Photos, videos and audio recordings of the child.
  • A child’s “persistent identifiers,” like IP addresses, that can be used to track a child’s activities over time and across different websites and online services.

Recommendations for Online Therapy

Clinicians and educators often focus on the capabilities of individual pieces of technology, and, indeed, a secure therapy platform is highly recommended both to ensure the privacy of sessions as well as student data. However, it is the information, and the sharing of that information by the adults responsible for the care of each child, that these laws focus on. So educators need to focus on a systems approach that considers the end-to-end process of handling and securing student data.

While clinicians are trained in student identity protection, non-disclosure methods and the maintenance of student record confidentiality, it is ultimately the school’s responsibility to ensure agreements they have in place with online therapy service providers support them in protecting student privacy. So what are the practical considerations in this end-to-end approach to protecting the privacy of students receiving online therapy?

  1. Ask what type of security is in place. Solutions with bank-level security offer the strongest protection of data. This includes 256-bit encryption using TLS 1.0, restricted physical access to the servers on which data is stored, and 24/7 on-site security personnel.
  2. Use a secure platform for therapy. Secure platforms use an invite-only, encrypted, secure connection. In this model, only the online clinician and the student assigned to that particular appointment time are permitted to enter the password-protected “therapy room.” Parents may also view a session with a prior written request.
  3. Use a secure server to store data. Make sure all student files containing individually identifiable health information and education records are stored on a secure server using industry-leading security.
  4. Restrict access. Only online clinicians, authorized school administrators and parents should have access to this password-protected information, thus further protecting student privacy.

This “big picture” thinking will let educators take advantage of new online delivery models for therapy services AND stay compliant with privacy laws. And leave Snapchat to the students.

Melissa Jakubowitz, MA, CCC-SLP, is the Vice President of SLP Clinical Services at PresenceLearning. She is a Board Recognized Specialist in Child Language with more than with more than 20 years of clinical and managerial experience. She is the past-president of the California Speech-Language-Hearing Association and is active in ASHA, serving as a Legislative Counselor for 12 years.