#ASHA14 Audiologist in the House

blogI have been attending the national ASHA convention since 2008 in Chicago, but this year is a special first for me–MY FIRST ASHA CONVENTION AS A CERTIFIED DOCTOR OF AUDIOLOGY!!! I started attending ASHA as undergraduate while still trying to determine if I wanted to study audiology or speech-language pathology. As an undergrad, ASHA was a little overwhelming. The graduate school fair and exhibit halls, as well as the many networking events, were greatly beneficial, but as I still didn’t have a concrete plan or field, my choice in sessions was eclectic and I don’t know how much I got out of them.

The next several years I served on the NSSLHA Executive Council as a delegate for Region 8 and then as a representative for Region 3, and even though I was “at convention” I was very busy with meetings and helping run NSSLHA Day and as such, didn’t get to many sessions. The networking has always continued to be phenomenal and I loved being emcee of the NSSLHA Battle of the Regions Knowledge Bowl, but I was missing out on sessions.

Last year, as a fourth year extern who was free of meeting and other responsibilities, I was finally able to attend as a regular attendee and found some great sessions (which after three-and-a-half years of grad school, I could understand), but this year will even top that as I now have a job as an educational audiologist and can search out sessions related to what I do on a daily basis.

I always look forward to continued networking and social events as well as the exhibit hall. I’ll be sure to check out Audiology Row, the opening plenary session and closing party (Where’s my owl with a letter inviting me to Hogwarts?). As I’ve been researching audiology sessions, I selected so many sessions and posters that were of potential interest that I’ve only got two slots that don’t have conflicting sessions. I’m working on whittling the list down, but there are some sessions I feel I need to catch. Management of School‐Age Children With Hearing Loss: From the Clinic to the Classroom (#1019) is one I feel will be particulary relevant. As I’m learning the ropes at my new job (I’m the only educational audiologist in a rural four-county area of Maryland), I’m rapidly discovering that regular follow-up with dispensing/managing audiologists is not something that always happens with my students due to geographic and socio-economic issues. As such, I’m starting to develop relationships with some of the audiologists at the Children’s Hospital a couple hours away where many students were initially fit.

I’m also looking forward to some sessions and posters on APD as working in the school, it is a “hot topic.” Disentangling Central Auditory Processing (CAP) Test Findings: A Road to Greater Clarity (#1110) , Differential Diagnosis & Intervention of Central Auditory Processing Disorders (#1405), and Treatment Efficacy of the Fast ForWord-Reading Program on Language in a Child With SLI/APD (6036 poster #136).

One final session I’m also very excited about is Noise Exposure & Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Among Rural Adolescents (#1492). The area in which I live and work has agriculture and aquaculture as two significant components of the local economy in addition to many recreational opportunities for noise exposure (hunting, shooting, ATVs, boating, etc) and I feel there will be opportunities to work on implementing some hearing conservation education at the high school level for many of the students I serve.

What are some of the sessions you’re looking forward to? See you in Orlando!

Caleb McNiece, AuD, CCC-A, is a new grad and educational audiologist for the Mid-Shore Special Education Consortium which serves four county school systems on Maryland’s eastern shore. Caleb is a former NSSLHA Executive Council member and is passionate about audiology students, audiology advocacy, pediatric audiology, and private practice.

Is There a Heffalump in the Room? Learning to Be a Leader, Part 1

0conflict

In Pooh’s “Huffalump” movie, Roo asks, “’Scuse me, what’s a heffalump?” Pooh, Tigger, Rabbit, Piglet, and Eeyore sing a song about the horrible qualities that they believe heffalumps possess (three heads, fiery eyes, spiked tails, etc.).

When presented with a difficult task or situation, we often find ourselves in conflict about how to deal with it. The Chinese word for conflict or crisis consists of two symbols: danger and opportunity. When we are faced with difficult moments, we must remember we have a choice. How we manage that choice often determines the outcome of the situation. In audiology, we are often faced with conflict ranging from difficult hearing aid fitting and counseling sessions to negotiating with vendors. Sometimes we have conflicts internally in our office or conflicts regarding professional issues in our membership organizations.

Conflict often makes us think of a negative experience that did not go well. We must remember, however, that conflict is not a bad thing but an opportunity for both personal and professional growth. Think about how boring meetings and conversations would be if people did not speak up and share their thoughts and ideas. If conflict is handled right, then there are benefits that you might not expect such as:
Better understanding of the issues and the opportunity to expand your awareness to the situation.
Increased trust among your team members and colleagues. People feel safe to express themselves, allowing an opportunity for growth.
Enhanced self-awareness due to being more aware of your goals and thoughts on how to be an effective leader and team member.

Handling conflict, however, does not necessarily come easily for most. Here are some key strategies that leaders use every day to help prevent and/or defuse conflict to allow for productive opportunities or engaged conversations.

When dealing with difficult moments:
Focus on the process. It is not about the people, it is about the system or process.
Go “below the line” for a collaborative approach for conflict resolution. Imagine an iceberg. You can only see the top, which is usually only 10 percent of it. To navigate the waters, you need to know what is below the sea line, the other 90 percent, to be safe.
Listen first and then ask questions for understanding. Remember restate, rephrase, and summarize when trying to gain understanding and trust.
• Create options collaboratively. Be open to ideas.
• Negotiate what options would solve the conflict.

When dealing with conflict, it is important to consider when do you take action and who should have the conversation. To answer when—the sooner the better. Addressing unprofessional behaviors, engaging with the dissatisfied patients, and/or intervening before people forget are essential to maintaining accountability, employee satisfaction and retention, and minimizing potential liabilities. To answer who—anyone in most cases. Regardless of the title, anyone should be able to talk to us and share ideas without feeling minimized or degraded. If the leaders blink or if the culture is of the mindset “it doesn’t matter, can’t change it…,” then it is important for the leadership to step in and be a role model on how to resolve conflict or better yet create a culture where conflict is considered to be an opportunity not a negative event.

To learn more about your conflict style, the Thomas-Kilmann Conflict Mode Instrument is a widely used instrument that provides helpful information on your conflict style. The conflict styles are Competitive, Collaborative, Compromising, Accommodating, and Avoiding. Different situations call for different conflict styles, so knowing what domains you typically prefer will be helpful.

I encourage you to take Roo’s direction and instead of being scared of conflict, look for the heffalump yourself and discover that often the many traits outlined are things that are not true or can be negotiated.

So, you ask, how do I negotiate these uncharted waters? Next, Leadership Realities Part II will provide you with your compass.

Tamala Selke Bradham, PhD, CCC-A, is a quality consultant in the Department of Quality, Safety, and Risk Prevention at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 9, Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood.

Changing the Clinical Question from ‘Can I?’ to ‘How Can I?’

thumbsup
It’s always easy to discuss how things should be. We start sentences with:

“It’d be great if…”

“Ideally…”

“In a perfect world…”

But typically, when we discuss ideals, we quickly follow up with:

“But that’s not realistic.”

“Too bad that can’t actually happen.”

“Wish it could really be that way.”

When it comes to clinical practice, I think we default to the latter group of statements far too often. We significantly limit what we believe is actually possible, because the things we know are good in theory are just too hard to apply in the “real world.” It’s easy to sit through a graduate class or a continuing education session, but it’s another thing entirely to apply that information day-to-day in the therapy room. Think about some examples:

We learn about the importance of evidence-based practice, but “realistically,” there is not a vast amount of high-quality evidence for many of our practices in this relatively young field.

We discuss the necessity of being sensitive to culturally and linguistically diverse populations, but “realistically,” we can never learn to speak every language or understand every culture.

We understand that the Code of Ethics exists for the purpose of maintaining best practices, but “realistically,” ethical dilemmas are not always so black-and-white.

So what’s the point then? Why do we have standards that we can’t live up to in practice? Why are we taught things that we are doubtful we can ever actually apply?

That, right there, is the problem. It’s the question we’re asking. We look at a client or a situation, and we ask, “Can I do this?”

“Can I find any evidence to guide my clinical decisions with this unique and difficult case?”

“Can I effectively treat this client whose language I do not speak?

“Can I maintain my personal and professional ethical codes when a ‘sticky situation’ arises?”

The problem with these questions is that from the moment we decide to become speech-language pathologists, we have already answered all of them. In accepting the responsibilities that come with being a part of this field, we have already said a huge, resounding “Yes” to every ‘Can I?’ question. No matter how challenging the situation may be, yes, we can do it, because we must.

One of my professors recently challenged our class to change the question. When faced with difficult situations that make us uneasy, or cause us to doubt what we can handle, we have to start thinking of it differently. Instead of asking, “Can I do this?” we should ask, How will I do this?”

 How will I follow the levels-of-evidence hierarchy in order to implement EBP, even when the current existing evidence base is not extremely strong in this particular area?”

How will I be creative and use resources to effectively treat this client whose language I do not speak?”

How will I ensure that I maintain my personal and professional ethical codes and engage in best practices, even when a ‘sticky situation’ arises?”

 How will I do this?”

 Many people are familiar with the famous quote from Spider Man, “With great power comes great responsibility.” While a few ‘Cs’ behind your name may not seem like power to most of the world, as members of this field, we know differently. SLPs have the power to help others, facilitate communication, and cause change, and I would say that is great power. We have been given the power, and therefore we have accepted the responsibility. We have said, “Yes,” to every tricky situation and every obstacle, whatever it may be, no matter how challenging. We have said “Yes,” because it is our responsibility to do so, based on the power we have been given. We can, because we must.

The next time you are faced with a tough case and are tempted to ask, “Can I do this?,” remember that you have already answered yourself. Can you do this? Yes, you can, because you must.

So, start asking yourself and others something different. Start changing the question. Start asking, “How?”
Kelsey Roberts is a student in the master’s speech-language pathology program at Abilene Christian University in Abilene, Texas.

Audiologists, You Know the Science of Hearing but Do You Know the Art of Listening? 

listeningstyle
As audiologists, we learn about anatomy, physiology, psychoacoustics, pathologies, technologies, and interventions. We are experts in assessing hearing sensitivity, diagnosing hearing loss, and providing audiological (re)habilitation with technologies and counseling.

Here’s a question, though: Are we experts in listening? To be an effective listener, you need to focus on the meaning of what you hear and take in to gain understanding. Have you ever taking a listening test? Have you ever given your patient a listening test?

There are many types of listening styles, and there’s also depth of listening. In reviewing the literature, I identified 27 different styles of listening and six depths of listening. I believe we use different listening styles and depths of listening based on what is happening in the moment. So, I am a client, I may, during a hearing test, be a discriminative, deep listener. Or if I am the patient learning about the new hearing aids you just fitted for me, I may be a content, full listener.

These are the four most common types of listeners.

People-oriented (empathic) listeners, who:

  • Build relationships and interpersonal connections
  • Search for common areas of interest
  • Tune into the speaker’s emotions, body language and prosody of speech
  • Ask, “Tell me all about it – what happened?”

Action-oriented (evaluative) listeners, who:

  • Prefer information that is well organized, brief and error-free.
  • Will digress when a speaker goes off on a tangent.
  • Evaluate information heard and do not take things at face value.
  • Ask, “What am I supposed to do with all this information?”

Content-oriented listeners, who:

  • Enjoy listening to complex, detailed information.
  • Ask questions to test speakers (are they credible?).
  • Focus on issues and if information is credible.
  • Ask, “Is that so?”

Time-oriented listeners, who:

  • Love “to do” lists.
  • Are overbooked, so they want messages delivered quickly and briefly.
  • Enjoy the role of keeping people on task during the meetings (the time keeper).
  • Ask, “And, what’s your point?”

If you are a people-oriented listener and your patient is a time-oriented listener, then your patient may feel that you are intrusive and not respecting their time. If you are a content-oriented listener, then be careful not to “throw the baby out with the bathwater”: When taking a patient’s history, you don’t want to ignore what could be key information because you believe there’s a lack of sufficient evidence.

And those audiologists who are action-oriented listeners may need to watch that they aren’t perceived as inpatient and not caring. Knowing your listening style can help you better understand how to adapt to various listening situations. Knowing your patient’s listening style will help you with how to deliver quality care!

There are multiple tests available to assess your dominant listening style.  Here are a few that I have used:

In establishing relationships with your patients, the importance is not so much in what you say as how you listen. Knowing hearing thresholds is only part of the evaluation. Listening to what your patient shares with you will drive your overall outcomes in patient care.

Tamala Selke Bradham, PhD, CCC-A, is associate director of quality, protocols, and risk management in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 9, Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood.

Ensuring a Warm Send-Off for Your Clients

handoff

Those of us working in hospital settings hear about discharges all day long. And we track everything about them: monthly rates, handovers, discharge summaries, patient’s perceptions of them.

In the outpatient world, discharges are just as important. When the patient leaves your office, do they know what they need to do next?

No matter the setting, we health care providers have a responsibility to ensure safety and efficiency when discharging a patient from care.

What happens when discharge isn’t done well? Patients experience adverse events due to delayed or absent communication, inaccuracies in information exchange, or ineffective planning or coordination of care between providers, as found recently in a study by Gijs Hesselink and his colleagues. In fact, at least 20 percent of patients report adverse events following discharge, and least half of these adverse events could have been prevented.

So what is your discharge or “thank you, goodbye” practice?  Here are five take-aways to consider:

  • Write it down!  Discharge instructions should be written down for patient understanding, not for compliance and insurance companies.  Don’t worry about saving the trees, give the patient the recommendations/plan of care in writing.  And, if you have it available, the patient should be able to review them at any time on your secure, web-based patient portal that you have available.
  • Share your instructions/plan of care with the patient’s medical home, therapists, and those that need to know!  Handoffs are one of the biggest problems in patient care that leads to adverse events.
  • Check for comprehension!  Having the patient repeat back what they heard is essential.  Using techniques like “Teach Back” or motivational interviewing are great ways to check for comprehension.
  • Make the discharge follow-up phone callMultiple studies show that if a simple phone call is made within 48 hours of the patient being seen or discharged from the hospital, it is a win-win for everyone involved. For outpatients, not only will you keep that person as a patient, but you will get more referrals due to having a happy customer. For hospitals, research shows reduced readmission rates and significant cost savings.
  • Own the discharge process.  When the patient leaves your practice/hospital, everyone who directly and indirectly touched that patient needs to own the process.  Does the patient know when to return?  Does the patient know who to contact if they have problems?  Will the patient tell a friend about the great experience they had?

Are you already doing these five simple things to keep patients safe?  If not, consider one of these for your next Plan-Do-Study-Act (PDSA).

For additional information about discharge planning, visit leancare.wordpress.com.

Tamala Selke Bradham, PhD, CCC-A, is associate director of quality, protocols, and risk management in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 9, Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood. This post was adapted from her blog leanhcare.