Taming the Wild Editor: How to Get Published in The ASHA Leader

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All around the world, wherever their presence is tolerated, editors are notoriously cranky and unreasonable. Some are so ill-tempered, they’re like wild animals. Can you blame them? They would rather be writers to begin with. Instead, these stunted authors toil in bumpy office chairs, sip stale coffee, and cultivate eye strain and stooped shoulders … while they pore over a seemingly endless pageant of manuscripts. Their profession is based almost exclusively on spotting others’ errors—in short, being insufferable curmudgeons. And this wretched life stamps its mark all over a person’s demeanor.

Right about now, you may be thinking: Thank goodness I’m not an editor. Most reasonable readers would agree and share your relief.

But here’s the bad news: If you’re a prospective author for The ASHA Leader, editors not unlike the ones we described above will decide whether your carefully crafted proposal is accepted or rejected. Like hungry (and angry) lions locked in a cage too long without Starbucks coffee, these ferocious editors seek out any signs of weakness in your proposal … and pounce. Call it instinct.

On the other hand, nothing is as soothing to these savage editorial beasts—nothing shines so bright a ray of light into their cluttered lives—as a well-crafted, compelling story proposal. Editors feel satisfied when they find an error, but finding a storyteller fills them with joy. It’s like catnip for editor lions.

So how can a prospective author brighten a downtrodden editor’s life? How can you find a path to safety—and publication—through the famished, circling lions? We’re about to arm you with the chair, whip and confidence you’ll need to tame a pack of wild editors.

In the Leader’s general guidelines, we ask prospective writers to submit a proposal form before they spend time completing an entire manuscript. This is designed to save everyone some time, rather than writing an entire story that may not be suitable for the Leader, or for its upcoming content. And the proposal form includes a checkbox for authors to affirm that they’ve read the Leader’s writer’s guidelines.

The catch, however, is that reading the guidelines typically isn’t sufficient. The Leader’s editors look for proposals that exemplify the guidelines: lively, entertaining stories that provide practical advice or enlightening information about communication sciences and disorders. Every story needs a “hook” to draw the reader in, and should be conversational enough to keep them reading. Write sentences in an active voice. Avoid technical terms, jargon and overuse of acronyms. And per the Associated Press Stylebook, don’t include parenthetical citations in the text.

In short, if an author checks the box affirming he or she has read our writer’s guidelines, we expect the proposal to demonstrate the guidelines. If it doesn’t, the author’s chances of being invited to submit a manuscript are greatly diminished.

Some have wondered whether the Leader is still a science magazine. It absolutely is. But it is not a scholarly journal. As far back as April 1962, James Jerger declared in Asha Magazine his belief that scientific writing can be readable—that it can inspire and inform while appealing to a wide audience. (The full article [PDF] is worth a read.) The Leader’s editors share Jerger’s belief. Instead of presenting concepts only to fellow clinicians, using specialized language and tangled verbiage, we see the redesigned Leader as a vehicle for clinicians to show the public and other professionals (those in CSDs’ many and varied areas) what they do—in language most readers can understand.

So what are the most important things you can do to ensure your proposal’s best chance for acceptance? The first four come straight from Jerger’s article:

  • Write short sentences. Use a new sentence for each new thought.
  • Avoid artificiality and pompous embellishment. Write it the way you would say it.
  • Use active verb construction whenever possible. Avoid the passive voice.
  • Use personal pronouns when it is natural to do so.

Most important, craft your proposal so its inspiring, informative qualities jump off the page. Use a hook. Include sample content that whets the appetite for more. Make the Leader’s editors sit up, take notice and demand to know where your story is going. At the very least, take pains to follow the writer’s guidelines in your proposal.

After all, when you’re fending off wild animals it’s usually best to throw them a bone.

Matthew Cutter is a writer/editor for The ASHA Leader.

How One Bold Adventurer Survived the Opening of Exhibit Hall at Convention (We Think)

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At approximately 8:35 pm on the evening of Thursday, November 14, a sheath of papers and an undeveloped roll of film were recovered by a custodian working in the Posters section of the Exhibit Hall at McCormick Place in Chicago. Tucked snugly under a (still warm) seat cushion, the yellowed, tattered handwritten manuscript and frayed film were rushed to the Leader’s office in Rockville, where they were subject to the most intense scrutiny and interrogation. Satisfied with the integrity of contents, astonished at the revelations contained therein, and aflame with ardent desire to share a unique eyewitness account of a quintessential ASHA convention event, the Leader presents the discovered manuscript in its entirety. For intelligibility, we’ve translated from the original Most Distant, Really Dullest, and Certainly Deadest Tongue.

DEAREST READER: Months of arduous sojourn across twilight epochs and treacherous terrain have brought me to this place, this moment, to this gathering of likeminded intrepid explorers poised to shatter the boundaries of convention and assail terra incognita. Mine is a wandering soul consumed by curiosity and troubled by siren calls beckoning through forbidden entryways. Standing and milling with hundreds of students and professionals outside the Exhibit Hall before it opens on the first day of ASHA convention, I am at last after all these long years among my own kind, again. We all want in, through that entrance blocked by McCormick Place staff. Right now. We’re just not always sure of the reason.

Someone pray tell—why are we here, waiting?

Huddled on the carpet some 20 feet away from the others, three students rapid-fire last night’s anecdotes and today’s possibilities while flipping through convention programs. Purses, askew tote bags and half-drunk cups of coffee ring them. Hmmm…perhaps their obviously keen attention to detail lends insights into why hundreds of us are all just, well, standing here ready to spring into whoknowswhat beyond yonder guarded entranceway.

After a lengthy, cross-city quest for a men’s restroom to change from elegant breeches and ruffles into roughen jeans and a too-plain button down shirt, I approach, ever hopeful, pen poised.

“So, are you waiting to get into the Exhibit Hall?”

Two nods, one dismissive glance back to the program.

“If you don’t mind me asking, why?”

Smiles and a chorus of replies. “I hear there’s lots of cool stuff in there—giveaways.” “My friend’s in charge of a poster session.” “I want to visit the bookstore.”

The latter speaker pauses, leaning forward. “We didn’t realize,” she hiss-whispers, “that there’d be so many people here when it opens!”

“Um…” I try to reassure. “You do know it’s open for all of convention, right?”

Shrugs. Blank stares. Heads return to programs and chatter resumes.

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I next squirm, dodge, and dart my way mightily to the front, hoping to converse with those possessing a vast reservoir of experience with such opening day events. One of the security staff is more than happy to chat.

(Me out of breath after crowd-tunneling extravaganza) “Why…in the world…are there so many people waiting… to get in?”

(Chuckle) “It’s always this way, sir.”

“Any reason for it?”

(Slight shake of head and sigh). “It’s just the way these things go.” (Mt. Vesuvius yell eruption) “MAKE SURE YOU ALL HAVE YOUR BADGES READY FOR INSPECTION!!!”

I scuttle-crawl away, none-the-wiser and God help me, somewhat deafened.

gary2

It’s now about 10 minutes before the opening of the Exhibit Hall, and a most fascinating ritual is occurring. The crowd without prompting or dispute is self-organizing into a single, momentously long, serpentine line that curls and stretches into the distance across the palatial hall. Sitters and standers fall into place; no disputes, just a low murmur of expectancy rippling up and down the line. Calling upon fifth-column skills well-honed for decades in His Majesty’s Most Glorious Topsy-Turvy Revolution, I slip into line, one-third back, without incident.

There’s still time to uncover the answer.  Hmm…perhaps another direction. My laborious research en route here did uncover the venerable Black Friday tradition of frenzied mob trampling while seizing limited time deals. Maybe exhibitors likewise promise opening hour deals?

“Hey, is anyone here to nab a bargain?” I call forward and back.

Universal acknowledgment of query but a stunning silence of reply. A few shakes of heads; one roll of eyes.

Dearest reader, I…still don’t understand. But, what the heck, let’s go along for the ride.

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11 am, zero hour. The line begins moving into the Exhibit Hall past security staff…steady…steady…the quick-stepping of hundreds of feet…we’re a millipede slowly picking up steam…and then the hounds unleash. Back segments of the line press forward and come alongside; we’re now four—nay, eight—across and coming on strong.

Faster. Faster. Oh boy.

A backpack-toting student a few millipede steps in front turns to me, brown eyes flashing and giggling. “Hey mister, you know why we’re here?? Because…it’s FUN!” Bursts of laughter.

We’ve just zipped past security and through the entranceway…rows upon rows of exhibits (staffed by some who seem rather startled by the human torrent) flash by to the right.

Goodness—most of us are surging left, a millipede in mad pursuit of the Poster sessions. Or NSLHA. Sustenance, perhaps? Wafts of downright delicious offerings pour in from 2 o’clock.

Pant. Pant. Fasterfasterfaster.  Woops–someone’s foot. Ouch—stand back, good sir. I must confess it’s most difficult to pen this narrative and properly capture visuals while honoring the press and pace of the crowd.

Oh my God, I can’t believe it! There’s hundreds of–

The narrative unfortunately breaks off at this point. The Leader has no reason to suspect that the author came to a grim, bone-crunching, nasty little end. We suspect that the tantalizing offerings of the Exhibit Hall were enough to draw him away from his sordid tale.

Gary Dunham, PhD, is the director of publications at ASHA. He can be reached at gdunham@asha.org.

Collaboration Corner: Supervision 101

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As a school-based clinician in the Boston area, I’m grateful to have access to some of the greatest learning institutions in the country. As an off-site clinical supervisor, I feel particularly obligated to make all that learning translate into something meaningful. In a public school placement, the school day can become insanely busy. This month I’ve decided to share a few tips that guide me both as a clinical supervisor and a professional.

Create a clear contract of expectations: Provide a copy of the school calendar with holidays, early release days. Provide a week-by-week schedule of expectations, including which specific clients your student will see, and how much supervision will be provided. Include any evaluations, reports and meetings your student will be expected to attend. Provide a mid-term check-in (even if the institution does not require it) and review academic expectations, this way you can give structured and specific feedback.

Know your learner, know thyself: Figure out early in the game, how she or he prefers to get information to you, including email or text messaging. Establish up-front what kind of feedback your student finds helpful, and how/when it is most helpful.  Generally, this seems to work if the student has pretty good insight as to how they function real-time. If they aren’t sure, provide examples. For example, do they mind if you jump in during a session, or do they prefer notes afterward?

Don’t assume anything: I usually get a list of the student’s academic resume and personal experiences. This doesn’t provide me with much information, so I go into the relationship assuming nothing. First, even if my graduate student has experience in a school, each school runs different, and has a unique culture. Second, I can’t assume they have any experience (or minimal experience) working with students like mine. Third and perhaps most importantly, don’t assume reading translates easily into application. A very clever mentor of mine once said, “Remember, you are only as smart as the last thing you read.” This is an important perspective, because not only are you teaching methodology, which brings text to life, but as a supervisor, you are setting the foundation for students’ clinical skills. Show them what they need to learn.

Encourage your student to journal: Reflective learning is the most important part of clinical growth. There is a ton of research supporting opportunities for reflection and professional development. I don’t ask students to show me their journal. I do ask them to take 10 minutes out of their week to sit down and write about two things: something that they learned that week, and something that they need to work to improve. I also encourage them to think larger, not just clinical skills, but interpersonal skills, and how they handled a difficult situation. Then, every other week or so, I have a heart-to-heart on how they think they are doing, and what they think their biggest accomplishes and challenges are thus far.

Leave at least 15 minutes twice daily for check-in: Once in the beginning before school starts to review lesson plans, and then once around lunch or at the end of the day. The first opportunity provides guidance on how to run the lesson; the second should be a chance to discuss how your student perceived the lesson-in-action.

Don’t take the little things for granted: Your students are always learning from you; this includes the good and unfortunately, the not-so-good-but-human moments. How you approach a conflict with a student or co-worker is a lesson. How you are able to comment on your mistakes (a good thing) is a lesson. So remember you are always a role model, not just as an SLP, but as a successful professional. Here’s the best part, I find students make us be the clinicians we want to be; even after a long week of parent conferences, a full moon of behavioral outbursts, or after one too many caffeine-fueled moments, they keep us accountable.

After all, after 16 years, I’m still learning, too.

Kerry Davis, EdD, CCC-SLP, is a city-wide speech-language pathologist in the Boston area. Her areas of interest include working with children with multiple disabilities, inclusion in education and professional development. The views on this blog are her own and do not represent those of her employer. Dr. Davis can be followed on Twitter at @DrKDavisslp.

Audiologists: As Hearing Aid Competition Stiffens, Show How Your Services Add Value

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Hearing aid consumers have an ever larger pool of hearing aid providers to choose from, with Internet dispensers, discount networks and Big Box retailers offering lower-cost options.

Patients may choose these options voluntarily to save money or because their insurers limit them to such options—but, given that such options rarely involve audiologists, the result is often improper, poorly fitted devices and unsatisfied clients, said audiologist Harvey Abrams, director of audiology research at Starkey Hearing Technologies, at a session on health reform and audiology at ASHA’s 2013 Annual Convention.

This is far from news to audiologists, who of course know that their health care training is necessary for proper selection and fitting of hearing aids. But the value-added of an audiologist’s services is often unrealized by consumers. Thus, said Abrams, as distribution channels expand, the key is to demonstrate that the audiologist channel is the quality channel because it’s centered on the patient and focused on positive outcomes. To differentiate their services and ensure that they meet these standards, Abrams recommended that audiologists:

  • Develop a comprehensive treatment plan that lays out strategies for patients to follow.
  • Administer a patient-focused income measure such as the Client Oriented Scale of Improvement to determine what the patient considers his or her most important treatment needs.
  • Use meaningful tests such as speech-in-noise assessments
  • Establish patient-specific treatment goals based on what the patient wants to achieve, using goals that are specific, measurable, attainable, relevant and timely, or SMART. Identify with the patient what he or she would define as success: For example, being able to carry on a conversation with a spouse in a relatively noisy restaurant.
  • Select hearing aid features on the basis of treatment goals.
  • Verify the hearing aid parameters with probe microphone instrumentation (real-ear verification measures): an objective, evidence-based way to fit hearing aids. Treat but verify.
  • Validate the hearing aid fitting. The definition of treatment success is how well patient goals are met.
  • Prescribe hearing assistive technology, such as FM systems, infrared systems and induction loop systems.
  • Provide post-hearing-aid-fitting aural rehabilitation services in the form of auditory training and/or group aural rehabilitation. Don’t just hand the patient a DVD!
  • Itemize your fees. Building them into the cost of the hearing aids just diminishes your value as a professional because they’re not then seen as payment for professional services, said Abrams. “If you commoditize your services, your patients will shop around, possibly online or at places like Costco,” he explained.


Bridget Murray Law
is managing editor of The ASHA Leader.

Harvey Abrams, PhD, CCC-A, is the director of audiology research at Starkey Hearing Technologies in Eden Prairie, Minn. He has served in various clinical, research and administrative capacities with the VA and DoD. He is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 7 (Aural Rehabilitation and Its Instrumentation).

Kid Confidential: Tips for Working with Students with Hearing Impairment in the Schools

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This month I revisited the topic of classroom difficulties and possible accommodations and modifications for students with hearing loss in the School Matters column of the ASHA Leader.  As there is so much to discuss on this topic, I was unable to share some of the inside tips I have learned when working with students with hearing impairment in the academic setting.  So I thought I would share this information with you today.

Here are the top five lessons I learned when working with students with hearing impairment in the schools:

  1. Work with the student’s audiologist.  I am not a specialist in the area of hearing.  Therefore, every time I have a student with hearing loss referred to me or placed on my caseload, the first thing I do (after reading the audiological evaluation report) is contact the audiologist to ask all of my questions and voice any concerns.  I know, as school-based speech-language pathologists, you struggle to have enough time in the day to do everything you need to do but this is the first and foremost important piece of advice I can give you when working with children with hearing loss of any severity (including children with sound field amplification systems, hearing aids, and cochlear implants-CI).  Audiologists do not expect us as SLPs to know everything about their field.  In fact, they are more than happy to share their wealth of knowledge.  I have learned so much regarding simple tests I can perform for quick assessment of my student’s hearing perception at varying distances to determine how they are perceiving that audiological input (i.e. Ling 6 sound test), how and when to recommend a student with CI to return to their audiologist to once again MAP their CI, what classroom behaviors are evidence of improved hearing and understanding and conversely which suggest possible malfunction of hearing equipment.  Without an audiologist’s guidance, I would not be able to do these things today.
  2. Consult with your district’s teacher of the hearing impaired frequently.  Although, the teacher of the hearing impaired may not be an audiologist, he/she knows the practical strategies and techniques to use while teaching students with hearing impairments in the academic setting.  I have learned how to teach speech and language skills effectively in 1:1 therapy, small group therapy, and in-class therapy for children with hearing loss.  I have learned how to troubleshoot if a hearing aid isn’t working correctly, how to hook up the FM system “boots” to a CI, and what to look for in the classroom and therapy setting that may indicate the need for further analysis of hearing equipment.  Using the teacher of the hearing impaired as a frequent resource to share ideas and answer your questions can be an invaluable and integral part of your therapy plan.
  3. Record in-depth observations:  This is a technique I use to determine if growth is being made in all observed areas even if not specifically targeted on current IEP goals (e.g. improvement in social skills, changes in responding to environmental noises, changes during large group classroom lessons, etc.) or if current progress is not yet quantifiable.  Quality records can help you to share the changes effectively (positive or negative) in your student’s speech, language, or academic skills with the student’s audiologist and hearing impaired teacher to determine the next steps in the therapy process.  I have found emailing my in-depth observations to audiologists for my clients with CI is an enormous help when they are working on MAPping my client’s CI. Parents cannot notice nor may they fully understand the big and small improvements or difficulties a child may exhibit in the school environment.  Therefore, it can be a challenge for audiologists to determine MAPping changes and needs based solely on parent report and child response.  Noting these observations, such as environmental and speech sounds, to which the child no longer responds, assists the audiologist in making the appropriate adjustments to the students CI so as maximal learning can occur.  Don’t underestimate the importance of functional observations.
  4. Get the classroom teacher on board.  Many times classroom teachers just feel lost when expected to appropriately modify for students with hearing loss in their classroom.  They may be anxious about working with this population, which can manifest itself in what seems to be uninterest or even noncompliance.  However, the truth is the classroom teacher may not know what do to and may be looking to you, the SLP, for assistance.  Showing how simple modifications made in the classroom, in real-time, result in improved learning opportunities for their student is one of the quickest ways to get your student’s teacher on board.  Also frequent classroom visits can help you in identify and address additional situations that may be inhibiting your student’s learning (e.g. environmental noises affecting hearing, lack of sufficient visual support in the classroom, classroom instructional language used is too complex, instructor not appropriately amplified at all times, etc.).  Helping to address and make the appropriate changes and adjustments needed in the classroom environment throughout the school year, can be extremely helpful for your student as well as for the classroom teacher.
  5. Do not be afraid to say “I don’t know, but I’ll find out.”  This is the best tool to use when working collaboratively with a number of various professionals.  You can bring your current knowledge and clinical experience to the table, however, no one expects you to know everything about treating every disorder or deficit.  It really is OK to say “I don’t know,” but just make sure you follow that with “but I’ll try to find out for you,” because ultimately classroom teachers, parents, staff members, and other therapists just want to know you are there to help and support them.  Since you already established a great working relationship with your student’s audiologist, I would recommend you start there when you have additional questions you cannot seem to easily answer or research.

Those are my top five tips for working with students with hearing impairment in the school environment.  Do you have additional tips you’d like to share?  Feel free to comment below.

Maria Del Duca, M.S. CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in southern, Arizona.  She owns a private practice, Communication Station: Speech Therapy, PLLC, and has a speech and language blog under the same name.  Maria received her master’s degree from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.  She has been practicing as an ASHA certified member since 2003 and is an affiliate of Special Interest Group 16, School-Based Issues.  She has experience in various settings such as private practice, hospital and school environments and has practiced speech pathology in NJ, MD, KS and now AZ.  Maria has a passion for early childhood, autism spectrum disorders, rare syndromes, and childhood Apraxia of speech.  For more information, visit her blog or find her on Facebook.

The Signs Of The Times

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Announcing the launch of ASHA’s Identify the Signs, a public education campaign broader in reach, scope, and array of ASHA member-oriented tools than anything we have done in the recent past.

Identify the Signs spotlights the importance of early detection of communication disorders and the ability of certified speech, language and hearing professionals to provide quality treatment and help. Altogether, it is a unique and promising opportunity for everyone in the ASHA community to be involved at every level, working in concert to raise the profile of our professions and most importantly, the needs of those we serve.

Nationally, the campaign features English and Spanish television, radio and print public service announcements that highlight the importance of early detection and encourage the public to learn the early warning signs. We also will engage broadcast, print and digital media outlets to bolster the campaign and direct the public to our new campaign website, IdentifyTheSigns.org. The website has helpful, easy to understand information about the early warning signs of communication disorders that will enable the public identify potential communication issues and seek treatment.

But here is a truly exciting part: Identify the Signs is designed to be equally active and effective at the grassroots. In the coming months, outreach to local media markets will be conducted, and we anticipate that it will result in opportunities to feature ASHA members. In recent years, numerous members have been very effective media sources and our new campaign represents a golden opportunity to increase the number who serve in that role, spreading the word about our discipline and the important work we do. Interested ASHA members are invited to indicate their interest by sending in a brief email to pr@asha.org. They will then be contacted as appropriate media opportunities arise.

Apart from that, there are a variety of campaign assets for ASHA members to use to raise awareness in their practices, their schools and their wider communities. Along with the public-focused website, ASHA has developed a member toolkit that includes print and digital posters, social media badges and more to educate people about the early warning signs of communication disorders and highlight speech-language and hearing professionals as the best sources for treatment. Also, products and brochures that complement the campaign are now available in the ASHA store.

We encourage ASHA members to visit the campaign site and use the outreach tools there in their communities. They are also invited to send feedback about the campaign, its resources, and their involvement to pr@asha.org. The Identify the Signs effort will extend over the next year, and such input will be helpful guidance for the future.

Patty Prelock, PhD, CCC-SLP, is the current president of ASHA and the dean of the College of Nursing and Health Sciences and professor of communication sciences and disorders at the University of Vermont. patricia.prelock@uv.edu.

ASHA’s Online Community Goes Mobile

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I love my smartphone and iPad so much that my husband often makes jokes about my need to be with one of them at all times. No matter what I’m doing, one of these mobile devices is almost always in my hands. I think it all relates to my inability to do just one thing at a time.

So while we are watching MasterChef or The Next Food Network Star in the evenings, I am also keeping up on what is happening in the ASHA Community.

As with any relationship, there are habits or characteristics that are less than appealing about the other person. The pet peeve I have with my mobile devices is the constant need to use pinch-to-zoom maneuvers to read or navigate the browser. To avoid this, I usually download the app when there is one available for a particular website or service.

Until now, the only way I could surf the ASHA Community was with my mobile devices’ browsers. You can imagine my excitement when the ASHA Community Mobile App idea was formed—my hand was definitely raised to be part of the team working on that project! Well, the day has finally come. The new ASHA Community Mobile App is not only helping my relationship with mobile devices, it helps all ASHA members with these unique features:

  • Convenient. Read all the latest discussions from your subscriptions in a single feed.
  • Seamless. Reply to discussions and post new discussions without pinch-to-zoom maneuvers.
  • Searchable. Find your colleagues in the directory and easily add them to your personal contacts. With a couple of taps on your screen, you can send an e-mail or make a phone call to another ASHA member.
  • Latest news. Find ASHA’s Twitter feed and read this and other ASHAsphere blog posts directly in the app.

If you are as excited as I am, then you have already downloaded the app on all of your devices. Just in case, here are the steps:

  1. From your mobile device, click on the appropriate link below or visit your app store and search “ASHA Community.”
  2. Download the app.
  3. Log in with your ASHA username and password.

Get it on Google Play

You’ll see your name at the top of the navigation. Under your profile, you will see Discussions, People, Inbox, Announcements, and a list of communities to which you subscribe. The ASHA Community Mobile App will help you stay connected with other ASHA members and allow you to post questions to your colleagues on the go–or when you are sitting on the couch enjoying your favorite show.

Visit community.asha.org/mobile to learn more about ASHA’s new mobile app. If you have app-related questions, e-mail community@asha.org.

Jill Straniero is ASHA’s online collaboration manager. 

Kid Confidential: My Top 10 Reasons for Attending the ASHA Schools Conference

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I know I typically write about some topic related to child development but I thought I would take a detour this month and write about my first experience participating in the ASHA schools conference.  The reason I think this is important is because so many SLPs out there are school-based or work primarily with pediatrics and my experience at the schools conference this year was a very good one full of great insight into various topics, issues and research on child development.

First, let me say that I get no financial or non-financial benefits for writing this article.  So that being said, rest assured this blog post is coming solely from my personal experience and opinions.

This year was the first year in my long career as a speech-language pathologist (yes, you heard that correctly) that I was able to attend the ASHA Schools Conference.  Although I had wanted to go for some time now, between marriage, my husband’s multiple deployments and motherhood, I just couldn’t find the time or financial means to attend before this year.  However, with that said, I had such a wonderful educational experience that I do regret missing out on conferences of previous years and I knew I needed to share with you that it truly is worth saving your quarters, dimes, nickels and pennies over the next year to ensure you can attend.

In an effort not to take myself too seriously and to make this fun for you, I will, like some famous evening talk show host I will not name, give you….(drum roll please)….

 

My TOP 10 Reasons for attending the ASHA Schools Conference:

10.  Location, Location, Location:  Every year it is at a new location in the United States and it’s a nice reason to go check out some parts of the country you might not otherwise ever see.

9.  It’s Some Work and Some Play:  Presentations are over by 3:30 on Friday and Saturday so you have the choice to stay for round table discussions or poster presentations but if you choose not to participate, the rest of the evening is yours to spend sight-seeing.  Sunday, the conference is over by lunch time so you have the rest of the day to grab your camera and officially play tourist.  I was able to head on over to enjoy the beach while the sun was going down one evening, walked about the harbor tourist shops on a Sunday afternoon and strolled along the palm tree lined streets and bike paths with my family.  It was some fun, work, and some super fun play!!!

8.  A Family Affair: I decided to bring along my husband and 3-year-old son on this trip.  They were able to spend some quality Daddy time while I was enjoying the conference and we had some nice family time in the evenings.  It was a win-win situation for me, still having some time to enjoy my summer with my family.

7.  It’s Like Looking in a Mirror:  Have you ever seen a convergence of 1000+ pediatric SLPs on one convention center?  We are all dressed in our khakis and flip flops with our bag of notepads, binders, tablets, pens and pencils slung over our shoulders.  It really is like looking in a mirror and seeing thousands of ourselves out there.  After registration, I was walking back to my hotel room and waiting at the crosswalk were two women who looked like … well me.  So I asked them “Are you SLPs?” and one woman turned around and said “Yes, but that’s a heck of a pick-up line don’t you think?” Ha!  So true!

6.  Feed Them and They will Come:  Yes you guessed it, your registration fee includes (or at least this year included) breakfast each morning, lunch for Friday and Saturday, and snacks.  The food was very healthy and delicious too.  No too shabby!

5.  It’s About What You WANT to Know:  The feel of the schools conference is not about who you know, what researcher you like or who’s work you just finished peer reviewing.  It’s about what you WANT to know.  “What session are you going to next?” was a question I heard often that weekend from strangers who became new found friends because they happened to sit next to each other in a session.  It’s all about what we have come there to learn and what we can share with each other when our sessions are done.  The exchange of educational information for the pure purpose of learning!  Ah, does it get better than that?

4.  The Social Network:  What I love about school SLPs is that although we love our technology, we also love our old school email (strange that email is actually old school now, don’t you think?).  Of the speech pathologists I talked to and exchanged information with, there weren’t any future “tweets” planned or Facebook private messages offered.  It was more of “Shoot me an email when you get back to ____ and we’ll talk.”  So yes, we are able to build our network of SLPs in a way that works for us.  And let’s face it, what SLP can really stick to 140 characters?  Limiting our ability to “talk” is really the worst nightmare for an SLP, don’t you think?!

3.   It’s Not What You Say, It’s HOW You Say It:  The presenters chosen for this conference (I can only speak to the 5 presentations I partook) were down to earth, engaging, interactive and some of them were very, very humorous!  David Hammer, an SLP who presented on CAS, introduced himself by saying he’s NOT an expert but a specialist because he believes he is always learning.  This is one example of how things said really change the dynamic of the session.  Luckily, he was not the exception.  All of the presenters I encountered and talked to were there because they wanted to share their passion for their field with us.

2.  Use Our Time Wisely:  Each presentation was FILLED with useful information, techniques, strategies and therapy activities we can use on a daily basis for a variety of different deficits and disorders.  I was very happy to see that my money and my time was NOT wasted on theory or upcoming research while only spending the last 15 minutes on therapy as many times happens at conferences.  Rather, after every presentation I left with the feeling that I had new tools in my toolbox ready to try in therapy with my clients.

And my number 1 reason for attending the ASHA schools conference is…

1.  It Only Takes a SPARK:  The number one reason I recommend going to the ASHA Schools Conference is because it helps flame the fire and passion we have inside of us for our field.  It only takes a spark, but once our fire gets going, we are hard to stop!

So those are my top 10 reasons for attending the ASHA Schools Conference.  Did you go this year?  What are your impressions?

I have already started saving for next July’s schools conference which incidentally is being held in my old stomping grounds of Pennsylvania.  I hope to see some of you in Pittsburgh next summer!

Maria Del Duca, MS, CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in southern, Arizona.  She owns a private practice, Communication Station: Speech Therapy, PLLC, and has a speech and language blog under the same name.  Maria received her master’s degree from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.  She has been practicing as an ASHA certified member since 2003 and is an affiliate of Special Interest Group 16, School-Based Issues.  She has experience in various settings such as private practice, hospital and school environments and has practiced speech pathology in NJ, MD, KS and now AZ.  Maria has a passion for early childhood, autism spectrum disorders, rare syndromes, and childhood Apraxia of speech.  For more information, visit her blog or find her on Facebook.

Never Having to Say ‘I’m Sorry’

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“I’m sorry to tell you that Sara has a permanent hearing loss.” One of the less glamorous aspects of being an audiologist is telling a parent that his or her child has a hearing loss. Although this is difficult news to deliver, how you convey that information can potentially have as much of an impact as the hearing loss itself.

Instead of apologizing for delivering this news, another way to frame the conversation is to say, “I know this may come as a surprise to you, but…” Although semantically similar to the apologetic statement, qualitative and anecdotal research has shown that parents will remember verbatim how the news was delivered to them.  As Dr. Jeffrey Lewis, a professor of mental health counseling at Gallaudet University who also teaches counseling skills to audiology students, comments, “This kind of subliminal language, though not intentional, can have real consequences for how the family approaches this news and can set lower or even negative expectations for the abilities of the child”.

Another example of negative messaging is using the word “fail” with regard to newborn hearing screenings.  Not only does “fail” suggest a hearing loss that very well may not be present; it can also make parents defensive. As one parent commented, “How could my daughter fail a test that she didn’t know she was taking?” Many institutions, including Boston Children’s Hospital and Gallaudet University, have incorporated this language into their clinical practice.

Knowing your audience is also important. For example, some deaf parents may be excited and happy to learn that their child has a severe to profound hearing loss. As one deaf parent explained, “With my first child, my husband delivered the results of the newborn hearing screening. He came into my room saying, ‘Alright she did it! Our baby passed the test; she’s deaf!’  When this occurred with our second child however, we were both surprised to learn that he passed in the sense that he was hearing and not deaf like us.”

Other deaf parents may be disappointed or have mixed feelings about this news. Most deaf babies are born to hearing parents who are in complete shock when they learn of the results.  By framing the news in a neutral manner, you are putting yourself in a position to support the parent and answer any questions they may have.

Although we are certainly not denying the shock and grief that most parents experience when facing a diagnosis of hearing loss, the less negative we can make the message, the better. Suhana Alam, a deaf adult recently selected to speak on a panel of successful deaf college students at the Annual Early Hearing Detection & Intervention Meeting in April commented, “The provider…needs to make sure the parents understand that their child’s brain works just fine; he or she just has limited hearing capability.”

As audiologists, we can then work with the family in providing information on the full range of communication options available to them.

Regardless of whether we are seasoned audiologists with years of experience or new audiologists beginning our professional careers, we are constantly adapting to change in audiology and critical evaluation of our language and word choice are easy adjustments that we can make for our patients and family members.
Cynthia Frey wrote this article with Whitney Kidd. Both are graduate clinicians in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers, and Families: Collaboration and Leadership Program at Gallaudet University.

Collaboration Corner: Why Finding Your Virtual Peeps Is Important

June 20

This month I wrote an article for Perspectives in School-based Issues (SIG 16), speaking to the benefits of professional learning communities (PLC). Professional learning communities are the ultimate form of collaboration (DuFour & Eaker, 2010). But consider expanding your boundaries a little further. Consider virtual PLCs; online communities through Twitter, Facebook, and online discussion threads. That’s right, social network sites and online forums can support your professional development, all from the comfort of your living room.

When I bring this up to my colleagues or friends, many groan… it’s one more thing, and how can you possible learn anything in 140 characters? Consider this:

  • One-third of public school speech pathologists travel between two or more schools (Edgar and Lugo-Rosa, 2007), thereby complicating the ability to meet face-to-face with colleagues
  • Professional development is meaningful when it is learner-centered, and by choice (Morewood, Akrum & Bean, 2010).

Virtual discussion forums can provide:

  • Opportunities to globally network with colleagues (Davis, 2012). More than just sharing hyperlinks and lesson plans, chatting with interdisciplinary teams and other educational staff, has broadened my perspective as a practitioner.
  • Online forums foster a chance to reflect (Davis, 2012). I have learned from the #slpchat colleagues, the #slpeeps, #spedchat folks, and the #edchat folks enormously. Many of these groups hold regular chats either every week or at least once a month.
  • Access information, or ask a question whenever you want (Dunlap & Lowenthal, 2009). Anyone with a smartphone can troll Twitter, or participate in an online discussion, any time of the day.
  • Access the only information that you need (Davis, 2012). Social network sites are completely dependent upon the user. This make finding information learner-centered, and not a boring, mandated, policy-driven affair.
  • A way to feel connected and supported (Hur & Brush, 2009). Sometimes getting out of your own workplace can help you regroup after a tough day.

So go ahead, dabble a little. Then advocate for yourself. Talk to your administrators. Write it into your professional development plan. Use the hyperlinks in this blog the and references listed below to support your case. Social network sites can be an affordable, meaningful tool for learning. For all the push to individualize learning for our students, doesn’t it make sense to do the same for those who teach them?

 Dr. Kerry Davis is a city-wide speech-language pathologist in the Boston area. Her areas of interest include working with children with multiple disabilities, inclusion in education and professional development. The views on this blog are my own and do not represent those of my employer. Dr. Davis can be followed on Twitter at @DrKDavisslp.

References:

DuFour, R., & Eaker, R. (2010). Revisiting professional learning communities at work: New insights for improving schools. Bloomington, IN: Solution.

Hur, J. W., & Brush, T. (2009). Teacher participation in online communities: Why do teachers want to participate in self-generated online communities of K-12 teachers? Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 41(3), 279-303. Retrieved from http://www.iste.org/learn/publications/journals/jrte.aspx

 Morewood, A. L., Ankrum, J. W., & Bean, R. M. (2010). Teachers’ perceptions of the influence of professional development on their knowledge of content, pedagogy, and curriculum. College Reading Association Yearbook, (31), 201-219. Retrieved from http://www.aleronline.org/