Beyond Skype for Online Therapy: Protecting Student Privacy

Privacy

 

The trend for kids online is sharing more, not less. Today’s kids consciously and unconsciously share so many aspects of their life using Facebook, Skype or even newer tech tools like Snapchat. But, as educators, we hold ourselves to a much higher legal and professional standard for protecting the information of these very same students. We’ve all heard about the laws—FERPA, HIPAA, COPPA— that set the standards for privacy of student records and personally identifiable information, but what do the laws mean in the context of delivering speech-language therapy online?

HIPAA: Protecting Individually Identifiable Health Information

Created by the Department of Health and Human Services in 1996, The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) is a federal law that protects patient medical records. HIPAA specifically protects “individually identifiable health information,” which includes:

  • the individual’s name, address, birth date and Social Security number.
  • the individual’s past, present or future physical or mental health or condition.
  • the provision of health care to the individual.
  • the past, present or future payment for the provision of health care to the individual.

HIPAA gives patients a variety of rights regarding individually identifiable health information. With consent, HIPAA permits the disclosure of health information needed for patient care, such as speech therapy.

FERPA: Protecting Education Records

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) is a federal law that protects student education records. FERPA gives parents certain rights with respect to their children’s education records until they turn 18 or transfer to a school higher than the high school level, thus making them “eligible students.” The law applies to all schools that receive funds under an applicable program of the U.S. Department of Education. Under FERPA, parents or eligible students have the right to:

  • Inspect and review the student’s education records.
  • Request a school to correct records they believe to be inaccurate or misleading.
  • Prevent a school from releasing information from the student’s education record without written permission (with some exceptions).

COPPA: Protecting Children’s Personal Information

The Federal Trade Commission instituted COPPA (Children’s Online Privacy Protection Act) in April, 2000 to protect children’s personal information on websites and applications that target children under the age of 13. Under the legislation, websites and apps that collect this information must notify parents directly and get their approval prior to the collection, use or disclosure of a child’s personal information. The FTC describes personal information as:

  • A child’s name, contact information (address, phone number or email address.
  • A child’s physical whereabouts.
  • Photos, videos and audio recordings of the child.
  • A child’s “persistent identifiers,” like IP addresses, that can be used to track a child’s activities over time and across different websites and online services.

Recommendations for Online Therapy

Clinicians and educators often focus on the capabilities of individual pieces of technology, and, indeed, a secure therapy platform is highly recommended both to ensure the privacy of sessions as well as student data. However, it is the information, and the sharing of that information by the adults responsible for the care of each child, that these laws focus on. So educators need to focus on a systems approach that considers the end-to-end process of handling and securing student data.

While clinicians are trained in student identity protection, non-disclosure methods and the maintenance of student record confidentiality, it is ultimately the school’s responsibility to ensure agreements they have in place with online therapy service providers support them in protecting student privacy. So what are the practical considerations in this end-to-end approach to protecting the privacy of students receiving online therapy?

  1. Ask what type of security is in place. Solutions with bank-level security offer the strongest protection of data. This includes 256-bit encryption using TLS 1.0, restricted physical access to the servers on which data is stored, and 24/7 on-site security personnel.
  2. Use a secure platform for therapy. Secure platforms use an invite-only, encrypted, secure connection. In this model, only the online clinician and the student assigned to that particular appointment time are permitted to enter the password-protected “therapy room.” Parents may also view a session with a prior written request.
  3. Use a secure server to store data. Make sure all student files containing individually identifiable health information and education records are stored on a secure server using industry-leading security.
  4. Restrict access. Only online clinicians, authorized school administrators and parents should have access to this password-protected information, thus further protecting student privacy.

This “big picture” thinking will let educators take advantage of new online delivery models for therapy services AND stay compliant with privacy laws. And leave Snapchat to the students.

Melissa Jakubowitz, MA, CCC-SLP, is the Vice President of SLP Clinical Services at PresenceLearning. She is a Board Recognized Specialist in Child Language with more than with more than 20 years of clinical and managerial experience. She is the past-president of the California Speech-Language-Hearing Association and is active in ASHA, serving as a Legislative Counselor for 12 years.

Aural Rehab: The Role of the Speaker

speaker
In my last blog post, Aural Rehab: Are we getting the job done?, I discussed the challenges faced by audiologists when it comes to the education and counseling aspects of the aural rehab process. I gave a brief overview of our Cut to the Chase counseling program, and introduced the “5 Keys to Communication Success.” Educating our patients about these five simple keys to successful communication will help them to understand a few important points:
• Communication is like a puzzle that requires several pieces to work properly.
• Hearing aids are only one piece of this communication puzzle.
• Involvement of family members, friends, and caregivers is essential.
When patients fully grasp the complexity of communication, and understand that each piece of the puzzle is critical for communication success, they are much more likely to be satisfied with their hearing aids and to comply with our recommendations.
Let’s take a closer look at the first key to communication success: The Speaker. Obviously the speaker and the listener are the two most important keys, as there would not be a communication exchange without them. But the speaker is arguably the most important key as they are responsible for creating a clear message that will be understood by their listener. This is why it is so important to involve family members in the aural rehab process. I’m sure I’m not the only audiologist who has experienced the following scenario:
I just fit Mr. Jones with new hearing aids, verified his fitting, and asked him what he thinks. He smiles and reports that they sound kind of strange, but that my voice seems nice and clear. He then turns to his wife and asks her to say something. Rather than looking at her husband and speaking to him in a normal tone, Mrs. Jones stands, walks to the far side of the office, and (with her back toward him) whispers to her husband, “Can you hear me now?”
Of course, Mr. Jones cannot hear her and, although I may have slightly unpleasant words going through my head for Mrs. Jones, I find this is the perfect time to educate her about her essential role as the speaker. I teach my patients to use their senses as a reminder about their critical role in the communication process.

The first sense is vision. The listener must be able to see the speaker’s face. This means that the speaker will often have to go to the listener before they begin speaking. Other times, the speaker will need to call to the listener, and wait for the listener to come to them before they begin speaking. This eliminates the difficulties associated with speaking from another room, or with their back toward the listener. Sometimes, however, this is not enough. That’s when we turn to the sense of touch.

When the speaker moves close enough to the listener that they can actually reach out and touch them, the speaker and the listener are perfectly situated for a perfect communication exchange. Sometimes the listener is so intent on a television program that they simply don’t hear the speaker calling to them. Rather than getting angry and yelling, I teach my patients to gently touch the listener on the arm to get their attention, and their message will then be received successfully.
Of course, we also teach the family members and caregivers to speak clearly and not to over-exaggerate their words. We encourage them to alert the listener to changes in topic, and to check-in frequently to make sure they are being understood. Most importantly, we try to impress upon the speakers that they are half of the equation when it comes to communication. We let them know that they can either be half of the problem, or half of the solution. This may seem harsh, but the importance should not be understated if we are to provide our patients with complete communication solutions! Next month we’ll focus on the other half of that equation: The Listener.

Dr. Dusty Ann Jessen, AuDis a practicing audiologist in a busy ENT clinic in Littleton, Colo. She is the founder of Cut to the Chase Communication, LLC, a company dedicated to providing “fun, easy, and effective” counseling tools for busy hearing care professionals. She is also the author of Frustrated by Hearing Loss? 5 Keys to Communication Success. Dr. Jessen can be contacted at info@CutToTheChaseCommunication.com.

Kid Confidential: The Latest on Treatment of Ear Infections

ear infection

For those of us speech-language pathologists who serve the birth-5 year old population (or have young children of our own), it is always important for us to know the most recent health and safety regulations that can affect our clients/students. Here are the newest regulations regarding the medical treatment of ear infections.

As otitis media affects three out of four children by the age of three, and there is a correlation between chornic otits media and communication delay, it is likely that we as SLPs will treat students with acute or chronic otitis media.  As a result we must understand the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) guidelines regarding the medical treatment of this condition.

Although, these regulations were initially released in 2004, it appears there is still much confusion among the medical community and, as a result, a second publication of the same AAP medical regulations for treating otitis media was released in 2013.

The regulations were written in response to antibiotic overuse and resistance in children.  Traditionally children are treated with antibiotics as the first line of defense for acute otitis media.  As there are a number of causes for ear pain, it is crucial that pediatricians firstly make an accurate diagnosis of otitis media prior to administration of antibiotics.  Doctors are urged to diagnose otitis media only when a moderate to severe bulging of the tympanic membrane (i.e. ear drum) is present.  Mild bulging and recent ear pain (i.e. meaning within 48 hours) exhibited along with other signs of ear infection (e.g. fever) also may be diagnosed appropriately.  Therefore, if the pediatrician is unsure of the diagnosis of otitis media he/she is discouraged t to prescribe antiobiotics.

Although pain is present, antibiotics are not necessarily to be considered the first course of action. In fact, in response to ear pain and/or low grade fevers, pain relievers are to be recommended initially as “about 70 percent of kids get better on their own within two or three days, and giving antibiotics when they aren’t necessary can lead to the development of superbugs over time” reports Dr. Richard M. Rosenfield, professor and chairman of otolaryngology at SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn.

Antibiotics are only to be prescribed when the child is exhibiting several signs or symptoms of otitis media (e.g. pain, swelling for at least 48 hours, fever above 102.2 degrees Fahrenheit, etc.).  Immediate prescription of antibiotics should be recommended in the event a child’s tympanic membrane ruptures.

Although it is important to understand the medical treatment of otitis media, perhaps it is more important for us to understand the simple preventive measures a parent can take to help avoid the development of ear infections in the first place.  In addition to this medical treatment plan, the guidelines also stress avoidance of tobacco exposure, receiving the influenza vaccination, and breast feeding exclusively for the first 6 months (if possible) as additional ways to prevent infant ear infections.

Medial guidelines for “silent ear infections” (i.e. middle ear fluid without presence of other symptoms typically following acute otitis media or colds) consist of “watchful waiting.”  If a child is diagnosed with “silent ear infections” also known as otitis media with effusion the pediatrician should initially provide no medical treatment.  A follow up reexamination should take place three to six months later.  If fluid persists for more than three months, the pediatrician should recommend a speech/language and hearing assessment.  If middle ear fluid persists more than four months and signs of hearing loss are evident, a pediatrician may recommend placement of PE tubes or refer their patient to an ENT for further assessment.

I very much appreciate the AAP for adding in the guideline of further assessment in the areas of speech/language and hearing if fluid persists longer than three months.  This demonstrates the AAP’s understanding of the important of communication development and the need for a quick resolution to such delays rather than the typical “wait and see” attitude that parents often report to encounter particularly in instances of “late talkers.”  Now we, as SLPs, have guidance and support from the AAP for our clients/students with long-term persistent middle ear fluid.

Please refer to the resources below for further information.

Resources:

Jaslow, R. (2013, February 25). Antibiotics for ear infections: Pediatrician release new guidelinesCBS News.

New guidelines for treating ear infections. (2004). The Harvard Medical School Family Health Guide.

 

Maria Del Duca, M.S. CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in southern, Arizona.  She owns a private practice, Communication Station: Speech Therapy, PLLC, and has a speech and language blog under the same name.  Maria received her master’s degree from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.  She has been practicing as an ASHA certified member since 2003 and is an affiliate of Special Interest Group 16, School-Based Issues.  She has experience in various settings such as private practice, hospital and school environments and has practiced speech pathology in NJ, MD, KS and now AZ.  Maria has a passion for early childhood, autism spectrum disorders, rare syndromes, and childhood Apraxia of speech.  For more information, visit her blog or find her on Facebook.

On Becoming an Interprofessional

teamwork

According the authors of “The Interprofessional Healthcare Team: Leadership and Development,” interprofessionalism refers to the active participation of different professionals, which may include persons with professional licensure or certification in nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, speech-language pathology, social work, and other health-related professions who are collaborating to provide quality services to the patients they serve. Through a steadfast commitment to collaboration, interprofessional practice among healthcare professionals seeks to enhance the quality of health and medical services, which lead to improved patient outcomes. Developing synergy between through shared knowledge and decision-making promotes positive change in work settings and builds meaningful relationships with patients and their families. But, say the authors, shaping efficacious teams depends upon fundamental knowledge of the represented field, the use of evidence-based practice, interprofessional leadership, and members who are prepared to collaborate effectively in a team, which we believe can be accomplished through interprofessional education (IPE).

 
The Institute of Medicine Committee on Health Professions Education provides recommendations for developing a strong team: “health professionals should be educated to deliver patient-centered care as members of an interdisciplinary team, emphasizing evidence-based practice, quality improvement approaches, and informatics.” Because of ongoing changes to the U.S. healthcare system, including insurance policy initiatives, technological advances, and innovative service delivery models, it is imperative for all professionals, including speech-language pathologists and audiologists, to embrace a new spirit of interprofessional collaboration and cooperation. Leading health organizations, such as the Pew Health Professions Commission, the Institutes of Medicine, and the World Health Organization, support the concept that health professionals have received adequate education to work in healthcare settings only if it includes experience participating in interdisciplinary teams to collaboratively solve complex problems.

 
Due to changes in service delivery models that have resulted in an increase of members within healthcare teams, interprofessional practice is rapidly becoming an expectation in most healthcare settings. Universities and training programs in speech-language pathology and audiology are only recently beginning to embrace models of IPE. In some universities, students from several disciplines are enrolled in the same courses, teamed for practicum experiences, participate in field-based experiences, and ultimately learn to work as effective, interprofessional teams. A unique way for IPE to be learned has recently occurred though simulation-based education in the College of Health Professions at The University of Akron.

 
Simulation-based education is an innovative process for creating authentic situations in which groups of IPE students learn to collaborate. Specifically, this technique can assist in overcoming some of the challenges that exist in healthcare: inadequate communication among professionals, focusing on specific needs rather than the whole patient, lack of knowledge of other professionals’ roles, the inability to work as an effective team member, and a lack of conflict-resolution skills. IPE conducted as a simulation activity may supplement traditional classroom strategies to enhance the performance of healthcare providers, ultimately resulting in reduction of errors in the workplace and an increase in the quality of care provided to patients. Although this strategy has been recognized by various international professional societies, including the World Health Organization and Institute of Medicine, as foundational to achieving safe, high-quality, accessible patient-centered care, not many healthcare training programs are on board.

Fortunately, as graduate students in speech-language pathology at The University of Akron, we were given the opportunity to participate in an IPE simulation activity. It included more than 90 students studying in the fields of nursing, nutrition/dietetics, social work, medicine, and pharmacy. Groups of five or six students from each discipline worked together to treat a specific, simulated patient. This particular simulation portrayed a young female combat veteran primarily diagnosed with a traumatic brain injury, with secondary diagnoses of depression, binge eating, insomnia, post-traumatic stress-syndrome, and cognitive deficits. Working as a team, our goal was to assess, diagnose and create a treatment plan for this patient to help alleviate her daily struggles, such as her inability to maintain a healthy diet, pay attention during class, and communicate effectively with loved ones. To develop an effective treatment plan, these challenges needed the knowledge and skills of each of the disciplines that participated in the simulation activity.

As the simulation began, we quickly recognized the need for strong interpersonal skills. It was a challenge figuring out when to speak, when to listen, and how to deliver opinions appropriately. Common observations of group dynamics included students promptly stating their opinions on how the patient should be treated before discussing a rationale or their role; students aggressively prioritizing needs of the patient without consultation; and many students reported they were unaware or had misconceived ideas about the roles of other professionals, especially speech-language pathologists. From these experiences, the need for this type of training was even more apparent. We learned that professional roles, especially speech-language pathologists, may be unclear to others, and we found ourselves advocating for our field and its importance in making treatment decisions. We also found that many students were very knowledgeable about their discipline but lacked good communication skills. This challenge resulted in a struggle to connect constructively with other students in other courses of study. We now recognize how vital  interpersonal skills are to delivering optimum patient-centered care.

 
From this exercise we now believe an IPE approach to teaching and training can have a tremendous impact on the preparation of speech-language pathologists and audiologists. With this training, students will enter the workforce with experience collaborating with other professionals and will understand the power of teamwork to accomplish a task. When students practice interprofessionalism and see the power in collaborating with other professionals, greater progress can be achieved in the workplace. Participating in the IPE simulation has boosted our confidence by showing us how to apply our clinical knowledge and skills in a safe but functional learning environment, but most importantly, it has given us a sense of how to work as a team to improve the life of our patient, which is the essence of patient-centered care. We have definitely taken our first critical steps toward becoming truly interprofessional!

Crystal Sirl, BA, is a graduate student in the School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology at The University of Akron.
Grace Bosze, BA, is a graduate student in the School of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology at The University of Akron.

 

 

Aural Rehab: Are We Getting the Job Done?

tin can 2Aural rehabilitation was once the root of our profession. ASHA defines it as “an ecological interactive process that facilitates one’s ability to minimize or prevent the limitations and restrictions that auditory dysfunctions can impose on well-being and communication, including interpersonal, psycho-social, educational and vocational functioning.” Audiologists know the importance of providing our patients with education, counseling, and training to overcome the challenges presented by hearing loss. However, the most recent MarkeTrak survey results indicate that very few of us are actually providing these services to our patients. This is an unsettling finding to say the least.

I truly believe that most audiologists attempt to provide their patients with adequate education and counseling. However, these MarkeTrak survey results prove that our attempts are not being received by our patients. I believe there are two factors at play: technological overwhelm, and unrealistic expectations. Patients are often so overwhelmed by the vast array of technology at their fingertips that their sole focus is on the technical workings of the hearing aids and wireless accessories. In addition, the vast improvements in technology lead our patients to believe that the hearing aids alone should address all their communication problems. What we are missing is a standardized, effective, and efficient aural rehab protocol that helps our patients to retain what they have learned, and use the strategies we teach them.

As a practicing audiologist, I face these challenges on a daily basis. As technology progresses, I find myself spending more clinic time educating my patients on the technical aspects of their new hearing aids. In a busy ENT clinic, time is of the essence, and this leaves very little time for counseling about realistic expectations, communication strategies, and auditory training. I tried various educational handouts as well as group AR classes, but struggled with patient compliance. I also found it difficult to engage family members in the rehabilitation process. When I read the MarkeTrak survey results, I realized I wasn’t the only audiologist facing these challenges. So in 2013 I set out to develop a fun and effective approach to aural rehab that would be easy for patients to comply with, and efficient for professionals to implement. I call it Cut to the Chase Counseling. There are three simple steps to this aural rehab approach:

1. Education: Patients need to be educated in a fun, easy, and efficient way. While there are many great educational materials on the market, I chose to create my own patient guidebook that organizes communication strategies into five simple keys (see below) that are easy for patients to remember. It is also important that our education addresses realistic hearing aid expectations as well as the importance of family member involvement. Our aural rehab approach defines the following components as the “5 Keys to Communication Success.” I will discuss these further in future blog posts.

2. Action: Patients need to immediately act on what they’ve learned to begin creating new communication habits early in their rehab process. We start this action with personalized Successful Communication Plans that guide the patient and their communication partners as they apply the five keys to their most challenging communication situations.

3. Follow-up: Patients simply cannot absorb and retain all of the education and counseling during their hearing aid trial period. They are often so overwhelmed by their hearing aids, that they may actually remember precious little from what we have been teaching them. For this reason, they must receive some kind of regular follow-up education. Studies show that consistent long-term follow-up drastically increases patient compliance and satisfaction. We provide this follow-up in the form of weekly emails that patients receive for an entire year following their hearing aid fitting. These emails reinforce effective communication strategies and encourage the patients to return to their hearing care professional with any questions or concerns.

We know that our job as rehabilitative audiologists goes far beyond fitting hearing aids. I hope this simple three-step approach will provide an efficient way for professionals to ensure that education and counseling are an integral part of every hearing aid fitting. In the following five blogs, I will dig deeper into the five keys to communication success and give you strategies for integrating them into your practice.

Dr. Dusty Ann Jessen, AuD, is a practicing audiologist in a busy ENT clinic in Littleton, Colo. She is the founder of Cut to the Chase Communication, LLC, a company dedicated to providing “fun, easy, and effective” counseling tools for busy hearing care professionals. She is also the author of Frustrated by Hearing Loss? 5 Keys to Communication Success. Dr. Jessen can be contacted at info@CutToTheChaseCommunication.com. 

Our Perception of Taste: What’s Sound Got to Do with It?

music

My first love as a speech-language pathologist is pediatric feeding.  I spend lots of time talking to little kids about “carrot crunchies” and “pea-pops” and various silly names for the sounds that different foods make in our mouths as we explore all of the sensory components of food in weekly treatment sessions.

Is it possible that sound is a larger component of our eating experience than many of us realize? What’s sound got to do with eating, or more specifically, with taste? Discovering how the sound of a crunching potato chip affects flavor is more than just curiosity.  Prof. Charles Spence, who leads Oxford’s Crossmodal Research Laboratory, studied how the sound that food makes in our mouths influences our perception of freshness.  It’s an important point for potato chip manufacturers, who strive to create the “crunchiest crisp possible.”

Background sounds in the environment also influence our interpretation of taste.  Spence conducted an experiment where individuals were presented with 4 pieces of identical toffee.  Two pieces were eaten while the subjects listened to the lower pitch of brass instruments.  Two other pieces were eaten while listening to the higher pitch of a piano.  The pieces eaten during the higher pitched piano music were rated “sweet” by the subjects and the pieces eaten during the lower pitched music were rated “bitter.”

Chef Blumenthal, owner of The Fat Duck near London, has taken Spence’s research findings to the next level.  Order the “Sound of the Sea” and you’ll enjoy more than seafood delicacies  presented on “a sand of tapioca and fried panko, then topped with seafood foam.” The dish is accompanied by an iPod nestled in a seashell, “so that diners can listen to the sound of crashing waves as they eat.” Spence reports that diners experience stronger, saltier flavors with the sound of the ocean in the background.  Another London restaurant, the House of Wolf, serves a cake pop along with instructions to dial a phone number and then, before tasting,  press 1 for sweet and 2 for bitter.  Diners who listened to the first prompt heard a high pitched melody and those who pressed “two” heard a low brassy tones.   In an article for the Telegraph, Spence said,  “We have also looked at the crispiness of crisps and biscuits and found that by boosting certain high frequency sounds when volunteers bit into them we could make them taste crunchier, and they became softer if we dampened those frequencies.”  It’s not just diners across the pond who are experiencing the marriage of sound and taste. Major food companies in the United States also have consulted with Spence, who developed a soundtrack to “complement”  the coffee at Starbucks®.  Speaking of coffee, in a recent study, Spence found that humans can detect whether a liquid is hot or cold, just from listening to the sound of it being poured into a glass, porcelain, paper and/or plastic cup.  I’ll consider this the next time I’m waiting for my drink at the local coffee shop.  Perhaps, from now on,  I can just listen to the sound of the pour, grab my drink and avoid the barista announcing “Lite Iced Triple Venti Half-Pump Americano Skinny for High Maintenance Melanie” with that smirk on his face.  But, I digress…

When I consider my little clients in feeding therapy, I wonder how this research might be expanded to detect possible differences in taste perception in children with sensory processing challenges, including kids with autism. Certainly, respecting the differences in a child’s sensory system is an integral part of feeding therapy for most clinicians.  Could it be that this hiccup in auditory, visual, gustatory or other sensory systems communicating efficiently with one another makes eating a variety of foods especially difficult for some children, more than we know at this time?  A recent article in The Journal of Neuroscience reported that kids with “autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have trouble integrating simultaneous information from their eyes and their ears” and discussed how this might affect their language skills. Wendy Chung, MD, PhD at Columbia University Medical Center explained in a recent video for parents how a poorly functioning pathway for simultaneous auditory and visual information (and the secondary problems of processing and responding to sensory signals) causes a child with ASD to be overwhelmed in environments that we find quite comfortable.  Perhaps future research may include Spence’s work and how it might apply to children in feeding therapy. Would certain tones be more soothing while eating?  Would certain music in the school cafeteria help children eat faster or even choose more nutritious foods? The common phrase “a feast for the eyes” may one day turn out to be “a feast for the eyes and ears” as we consider all the possibilities.

Melanie Potock, MA, CCC-SLP, treats children birth to teens who have difficulty eating.  She is the author of Happy Mealtimes with Happy Kids and the producer of the award-winning kids’ CD Dancing in the Kitchen: Songs that Celebrate the Joy of Food!  Melanie’s two-day course on pediatric feeding is  offered for ASHA CEUs and includes both her book and CD for each attendee.  She can be reached at Melanie@mymunchbug.com.

ASHAWire: A New Online Platform for ASHA’s Publications

ASHAWire-Cover-image (1) copy

So … you’re hip deep in a CSD search, frustrated because the results are thin and a bit cumbersome to get to—that’s because most online searches are based on actual text matching rather than true meaning and resonance among concepts and terms. For more relevant results with less searching, check out ASHAWire, the new online home for ASHA’s main publications. ASHA content from the scholarly journals, the Leader, and Perspectives have been tagged semantically, allowing for deeper, more intelligent searching of your favorite publications. Even better, your search will also pull up a whole host of related articles for you to pursue at your leisure.

Scenario 1:  An awesome article just appeared in LSHSS and you’re eager to share it with a colleague down the hall. No problem! ASHAWire gives you—wait for it, wait for it—five different ways to share ASHA content through social media. Now, there’s no excuse not to let others know about the ton of goings-on in the journals, Leader and Perspectives.

Scenario 2: You’re passionate about a CSD subject and are always on the lookout for new articles in that area. ASHAWire can help! The new online platform offers dozens of CSD topic collections featuring up-to-the-minute feeds of relevant articles just as they are published in the scholarly journals, Perspectives and The ASHA Leader. Furthermore, since all articles in ASHA’s journals are now published as they are received rather than waiting for the next issue to be assembled, the topic feeds will be more current than ever.

Scenario 3: On a pack-filled passenger train heading home, you suddenly receive a text from a colleague who’s super excited about an article citing your research she just read in AJA. Darn, will you have to wait another long, excruciating, nail-chewing hour to view your moment of glory on the PC at home? Nope…ASHAWire’s been responsively designed so that ASHA publications can be accessed through mobile devices and tablets. 24/7 content, anytime and anyplace (assuming you’re not spelunking, deep sea diving or wrestling a yak on some forsaken frozen tundra).

Robust in functionality and sporting a striking design, ASHAWire brings together for the first time on a single online platform ASHA’s newsmagazine, its peer-reviewed journals, and the 18 periodicals sponsored by the Special Interest Groups. (Please note that 2013-2014 issues of the Leader are currently on the platform; the Leader archive will be transferred to ASHAWire over the next few months.) Think of it … the diverse content of ASHA’s three main publications seamlessly integrated into searches, navigation, feeds of the latest articles and topic collections.

ASHAWire went live in late December, and is already becoming popular with readers. To be sure, like all new online initiatives, modifications and upgrades are ongoing. I encourage visitors to take advantage of all of the capabilities of the platform by using Google Chrome, FireFox, Safari or the later versions of Internet Explorer.

There’s much more to come. Over the next weeks and months, we’ll continue adding even more functionality to an already powerful platform. For example, there’s the new multimedia capability of the platform … slideshows, videos, you name it, all designed to enrich the reading and learning experiences of ASHA members. We’re now busily integrating video options into all of ASHA’s publications, including interviews with and/or demonstrations by authors of journal and Perspectives articles, video and slide supplements to journal articles, and regular video columns in future issues of the Leader.

The bottom line is this: Enjoy your one-stop-shopping, CSD-at-your-fingertips experience. It will just keep getting better. Have suggestions or other feedback? Feel free to drop us a line at journals@asha.org or perspectives@asha.org.

 Gary Dunham, PhDis the director of publications at ASHA. He can be reached at gdunham@asha.org.

 

 

 

Continuing Education: The Options; The Reality

conted

Kids, my own or those I work with, are often slightly astonished that I like school—genuinely like school.  They can’t believe I willingly went to school beyond college and even now happily sign up for multi-day seminars.

Apart from the fact that it’s required for us to maintain our certification (30 hrs or 3.0 CEUs/3-year maintenance period) and the ethical obligation to stay current with best practices, I truly enjoy hearing about new methods, gathering information and collaborating with others in our field.

As a result, I’ve racked up a lot of CEUs over the years and  have found not all CEUs are created equal.  There are marked differences between the types offered and unless you’re really just trying to cross off credits, you need to know which will best suit your needs.

ASHA or State Convention

ASHA provides up to 2.6 CEUs; or up to 3.15 if you register for pre-conference activities.  State conventions will vary, but .6-1.4 CEUs seems to be the standard.

Pros:

  1.  There are lots of different topics available, sometimes on very niche issues that wouldn’t make sense, or be cost effective, for an entire seminar.
  2. If you realize 10 minutes into a session that it isn’t what you expected or that the speaker is so dry you’ll be nodding off if you stick around, you can simply hop up and move to another session.  At ASHA you can follow the Twitter feed to find out where the good stuff is happening
  3. Go with a friend and you can double the amount of information you receive (though your credits stay the same).  It’s a certainty that you will find some times slots overflowing with sessions your dying to hear—split up the work.
  4. It’s also a certainty that some time slots will have no compatible sessions to your interests.  No worries, head to the exhibit hall!  The exhibit hall at ASHA requires you to set aside a decent chunk of time, but even the state vendors are worth a look.  This is an outstanding opportunity to see new products, have someone walk you through scoring on a new assessment tool, or find resources for referral in your area.  And don’t forget the giveaways—you won’t need new pens for a year!
  5. Networking is a huge opportunity, especially at ASHA when participants are staying in the area for a few days.  You can meet up at the ASHA sponsored events or join smaller groups like the #SLPeeps at dinner.  You’ll get more information, recommendations and camaraderie than you thought possible and head home reinvigorated about the profession.

Cons:

  1.  Though there is tremendous variety in topics some of them can be fairly obscure, but, hey, that means there really is something for everyone.
  2. The title and even the couple sentence description can be misleading.  You may not really know what you’re walking into until you’re in it.
  3. The sessions are short!  Unless you pony up for a short course, the sessions are 30min-2 hrs.  Sometimes I feel like we’re just getting started when they start wrapping it up!
  4. There can be, for better or worse, a lot of anonymity at a big conference.  If you want to network, you’ll need to put yourself out there otherwise you’re one person in a very large sea.  I think I saw that ASHA broke records this year with over 14,000 attendees!

Seminars

This will vary widely depending on the topic and number of attendance days.  Most will provide up to .6 per day.

Pros:

  1.  You can really delve into a topic at a seminar and the sign-up literature is usually very specific as to what will be covered.
  2. Seminars move around quite a bit and you might get to see one of the stars of our profession in a smaller setting that allows one-on-one interaction at some point (yes, I’ve asked for autographs).
  3. Seminars tend to be more clinically based, rather than strictly research, so you will usually find yourself implementing new techniques, maybe even materials, the day you get back.
  4. Seminars tend to have more participatory components.  You might get to try out techniques on other therapists, write plans/goals, or play a “patient” yourself.
  5. Keep your eyes peeled and you can attend something very close to home, even if you don’t live in a metro area.  This can cut down on costs substantially.

 

Cons:

  1.  If you’ve made a bad decision, you’re pretty much stuck.  Get a cup of caffeinated coffee, try to muddle through awake and ask a lot of questions.  Some speakers will improve with participant interaction and at least you’ll get some of the info you were looking to find.
  2. You can get quite a few hours in with a one or two day seminar, but it will likely take a few to cover your total CEU requirements.  You need to consider travel costs, but seminars themselves are usually pricier/hour.
  3. Some seminars have a bit of a cult-like feel.  If you’ve drunk the Kool-Aid yourself, that’s fine, but if you’re a dissenter and question the theory … you might find the room gets a little chilly.  Oops.

At Home Options

Again, this varies widely.  You can take on-line courses as short as an hour (.1 CEU), or sign on to a webcast and get a few hours.  An ASHA on-line conference like the one on Neurodegenerative Disorders (2/19-3/3) can earn you up to 2.6.  There are also DVD or CD courses and self-study journal article options.

Pros:

  1.  The convenience of CEUs earned at home can’t be ignored.  You can do them at your leisure, devoting just a bit of time each day or make it a marathon session and knock it all out at once.  You can do it before the kids wake up or after they go to sleep, or during a snow day.
  2. With no travel expenses, the cost can be much lower than other alternatives.  ASHA SIG members can earn very inexpensive CEUs through self-study as well as discounts on other related ASHA courses.  SpeechPathology.com offers a yearly subscription for unlimited on-line courses.  Specific organizations such as The Stuttering Foundation have very economical DVD classes.
  3. You have a lot of flexibility in terms of topic.  There are lots and lots of courses available and you don’t need to wait for it to arrive somewhere near you.

Cons:

  1.  You’ll need some discipline.  Make that quite a bit of discipline.  It’s really easy to let a stack of DVDs sit, and sit…and sit some more.  It’s even easier to start a course only to find you never finished it.  Be honest with yourself and what you are likely to accomplish.
  2. The quality of the DVDs/CDs will be fine, but in a world of surround sound and fast paced cable shows you will be astonished at how slow a lecture moves.  Speakers that are dynamic in person are often diminished on film when you lose the energy of the audience as well.  And beware if you stop a DVD and try to find your place again later!  When the “scene” never changes, it can be frustrating to try and relocate your stopping point.
  3. Interaction is often limited.  Live webinars and conferences will give you an opportunity to ask questions, but other options lack this ability.

In the examples above, I’m referring to ASHA-approved course,s which are required for the ACE award and can be tracked through the ASHA CEU Registry.  However, ASHA does permit other CEU credits to count toward your certification maintenance.  Check the guidelines for information on continuing education credits without pre-approval.

Kim Lewis is a pediatric clinician in Greensboro, NC and blogs at ActivityTailor.com.  Attendance at the ASHA convention this fall qualified her for an ACE award (7.0+ CEUs in a 36 month period).

Taming the Wild Editor: How to Get Published in The ASHA Leader

lion

All around the world, wherever their presence is tolerated, editors are notoriously cranky and unreasonable. Some are so ill-tempered, they’re like wild animals. Can you blame them? They would rather be writers to begin with. Instead, these stunted authors toil in bumpy office chairs, sip stale coffee, and cultivate eye strain and stooped shoulders … while they pore over a seemingly endless pageant of manuscripts. Their profession is based almost exclusively on spotting others’ errors—in short, being insufferable curmudgeons. And this wretched life stamps its mark all over a person’s demeanor.

Right about now, you may be thinking: Thank goodness I’m not an editor. Most reasonable readers would agree and share your relief.

But here’s the bad news: If you’re a prospective author for The ASHA Leader, editors not unlike the ones we described above will decide whether your carefully crafted proposal is accepted or rejected. Like hungry (and angry) lions locked in a cage too long without Starbucks coffee, these ferocious editors seek out any signs of weakness in your proposal … and pounce. Call it instinct.

On the other hand, nothing is as soothing to these savage editorial beasts—nothing shines so bright a ray of light into their cluttered lives—as a well-crafted, compelling story proposal. Editors feel satisfied when they find an error, but finding a storyteller fills them with joy. It’s like catnip for editor lions.

So how can a prospective author brighten a downtrodden editor’s life? How can you find a path to safety—and publication—through the famished, circling lions? We’re about to arm you with the chair, whip and confidence you’ll need to tame a pack of wild editors.

In the Leader’s general guidelines, we ask prospective writers to submit a proposal form before they spend time completing an entire manuscript. This is designed to save everyone some time, rather than writing an entire story that may not be suitable for the Leader, or for its upcoming content. And the proposal form includes a checkbox for authors to affirm that they’ve read the Leader’s writer’s guidelines.

The catch, however, is that reading the guidelines typically isn’t sufficient. The Leader’s editors look for proposals that exemplify the guidelines: lively, entertaining stories that provide practical advice or enlightening information about communication sciences and disorders. Every story needs a “hook” to draw the reader in, and should be conversational enough to keep them reading. Write sentences in an active voice. Avoid technical terms, jargon and overuse of acronyms. And per the Associated Press Stylebook, don’t include parenthetical citations in the text.

In short, if an author checks the box affirming he or she has read our writer’s guidelines, we expect the proposal to demonstrate the guidelines. If it doesn’t, the author’s chances of being invited to submit a manuscript are greatly diminished.

Some have wondered whether the Leader is still a science magazine. It absolutely is. But it is not a scholarly journal. As far back as April 1962, James Jerger declared in Asha Magazine his belief that scientific writing can be readable—that it can inspire and inform while appealing to a wide audience. (The full article [PDF] is worth a read.) The Leader’s editors share Jerger’s belief. Instead of presenting concepts only to fellow clinicians, using specialized language and tangled verbiage, we see the redesigned Leader as a vehicle for clinicians to show the public and other professionals (those in CSDs’ many and varied areas) what they do—in language most readers can understand.

So what are the most important things you can do to ensure your proposal’s best chance for acceptance? The first four come straight from Jerger’s article:

  • Write short sentences. Use a new sentence for each new thought.
  • Avoid artificiality and pompous embellishment. Write it the way you would say it.
  • Use active verb construction whenever possible. Avoid the passive voice.
  • Use personal pronouns when it is natural to do so.

Most important, craft your proposal so its inspiring, informative qualities jump off the page. Use a hook. Include sample content that whets the appetite for more. Make the Leader’s editors sit up, take notice and demand to know where your story is going. At the very least, take pains to follow the writer’s guidelines in your proposal.

After all, when you’re fending off wild animals it’s usually best to throw them a bone.

Matthew Cutter is a writer/editor for The ASHA Leader.

How One Bold Adventurer Survived the Opening of Exhibit Hall at Convention (We Think)

running of bulls

At approximately 8:35 pm on the evening of Thursday, November 14, a sheath of papers and an undeveloped roll of film were recovered by a custodian working in the Posters section of the Exhibit Hall at McCormick Place in Chicago. Tucked snugly under a (still warm) seat cushion, the yellowed, tattered handwritten manuscript and frayed film were rushed to the Leader’s office in Rockville, where they were subject to the most intense scrutiny and interrogation. Satisfied with the integrity of contents, astonished at the revelations contained therein, and aflame with ardent desire to share a unique eyewitness account of a quintessential ASHA convention event, the Leader presents the discovered manuscript in its entirety. For intelligibility, we’ve translated from the original Most Distant, Really Dullest, and Certainly Deadest Tongue.

DEAREST READER: Months of arduous sojourn across twilight epochs and treacherous terrain have brought me to this place, this moment, to this gathering of likeminded intrepid explorers poised to shatter the boundaries of convention and assail terra incognita. Mine is a wandering soul consumed by curiosity and troubled by siren calls beckoning through forbidden entryways. Standing and milling with hundreds of students and professionals outside the Exhibit Hall before it opens on the first day of ASHA convention, I am at last after all these long years among my own kind, again. We all want in, through that entrance blocked by McCormick Place staff. Right now. We’re just not always sure of the reason.

Someone pray tell—why are we here, waiting?

Huddled on the carpet some 20 feet away from the others, three students rapid-fire last night’s anecdotes and today’s possibilities while flipping through convention programs. Purses, askew tote bags and half-drunk cups of coffee ring them. Hmmm…perhaps their obviously keen attention to detail lends insights into why hundreds of us are all just, well, standing here ready to spring into whoknowswhat beyond yonder guarded entranceway.

After a lengthy, cross-city quest for a men’s restroom to change from elegant breeches and ruffles into roughen jeans and a too-plain button down shirt, I approach, ever hopeful, pen poised.

“So, are you waiting to get into the Exhibit Hall?”

Two nods, one dismissive glance back to the program.

“If you don’t mind me asking, why?”

Smiles and a chorus of replies. “I hear there’s lots of cool stuff in there—giveaways.” “My friend’s in charge of a poster session.” “I want to visit the bookstore.”

The latter speaker pauses, leaning forward. “We didn’t realize,” she hiss-whispers, “that there’d be so many people here when it opens!”

“Um…” I try to reassure. “You do know it’s open for all of convention, right?”

Shrugs. Blank stares. Heads return to programs and chatter resumes.

gary1

I next squirm, dodge, and dart my way mightily to the front, hoping to converse with those possessing a vast reservoir of experience with such opening day events. One of the security staff is more than happy to chat.

(Me out of breath after crowd-tunneling extravaganza) “Why…in the world…are there so many people waiting… to get in?”

(Chuckle) “It’s always this way, sir.”

“Any reason for it?”

(Slight shake of head and sigh). “It’s just the way these things go.” (Mt. Vesuvius yell eruption) “MAKE SURE YOU ALL HAVE YOUR BADGES READY FOR INSPECTION!!!”

I scuttle-crawl away, none-the-wiser and God help me, somewhat deafened.

gary2

It’s now about 10 minutes before the opening of the Exhibit Hall, and a most fascinating ritual is occurring. The crowd without prompting or dispute is self-organizing into a single, momentously long, serpentine line that curls and stretches into the distance across the palatial hall. Sitters and standers fall into place; no disputes, just a low murmur of expectancy rippling up and down the line. Calling upon fifth-column skills well-honed for decades in His Majesty’s Most Glorious Topsy-Turvy Revolution, I slip into line, one-third back, without incident.

There’s still time to uncover the answer.  Hmm…perhaps another direction. My laborious research en route here did uncover the venerable Black Friday tradition of frenzied mob trampling while seizing limited time deals. Maybe exhibitors likewise promise opening hour deals?

“Hey, is anyone here to nab a bargain?” I call forward and back.

Universal acknowledgment of query but a stunning silence of reply. A few shakes of heads; one roll of eyes.

Dearest reader, I…still don’t understand. But, what the heck, let’s go along for the ride.

gary3

11 am, zero hour. The line begins moving into the Exhibit Hall past security staff…steady…steady…the quick-stepping of hundreds of feet…we’re a millipede slowly picking up steam…and then the hounds unleash. Back segments of the line press forward and come alongside; we’re now four—nay, eight—across and coming on strong.

Faster. Faster. Oh boy.

A backpack-toting student a few millipede steps in front turns to me, brown eyes flashing and giggling. “Hey mister, you know why we’re here?? Because…it’s FUN!” Bursts of laughter.

We’ve just zipped past security and through the entranceway…rows upon rows of exhibits (staffed by some who seem rather startled by the human torrent) flash by to the right.

Goodness—most of us are surging left, a millipede in mad pursuit of the Poster sessions. Or NSLHA. Sustenance, perhaps? Wafts of downright delicious offerings pour in from 2 o’clock.

Pant. Pant. Fasterfasterfaster.  Woops–someone’s foot. Ouch—stand back, good sir. I must confess it’s most difficult to pen this narrative and properly capture visuals while honoring the press and pace of the crowd.

Oh my God, I can’t believe it! There’s hundreds of–

The narrative unfortunately breaks off at this point. The Leader has no reason to suspect that the author came to a grim, bone-crunching, nasty little end. We suspect that the tantalizing offerings of the Exhibit Hall were enough to draw him away from his sordid tale.

Gary Dunham, PhD, is the director of publications at ASHA. He can be reached at gdunham@asha.org.