Get involved! Why? Because I say so!

I’ve been struggling to write my last post about the 2011 ASHA Convention. What could I possibly have to say that would sum up my experience? Should I be funny? Light hearted? Should I try to send a message? Reach out?

ALL OF THE ABOVE?

That’s the one!

I discovered something about myself while I was at the ASHA Convention. I really like the administrative side of things. It’s been sneaking up on me – an interest in policies, positions, procedures, politics (whew – what an alliteration!) But there it is. Can’t be denied. I just really enjoy knowing what is going on, how it affects me, how it affects my clients – and you’d think this would be the case with everyone.

However, I discovered something else at ASHA as well – a sort of apathetic, passive, bystander effect among CSD professionals when it comes to legislative and regulatory issues. Obviously this isn’t necessarily the rule, and I truly hope it is the exception. But there seems to be this sense that issues which go outside of our clients and our place of business, go beyond us overall.

I attended a lecture entitled Advocacy 101: Add Your Voice, which was presented by ASHA’s Government Relations and Public Policy Board (Regina Grimmett and Shelley Victor.) The description was as follows:

  • This session is proposed by the Governmental Relations Public Policy Board (GRPP) to promote advocacy as related to legislative, regulatory, and other public policy activities affecting the professions. Presenters will explain strategies for self-advocacy, illustrate data use for advocating issues, and demonstrate strategies for meeting legislators/government officials.

After the lecture, learners would be able to:

  • describe their role in professional grassroots advocacy at the local, state, and/or national levels.
  • define advocacy–its goals, types, and benefits of grassroots advocacy efforts
  • advocate for specific federal and/or state issues that affect the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology.

To me, this sounds like pretty important stuff. At the undergraduate and graduate level we are taught that advocacy is within our scope and is our responsibility. Usually we think of that in terms of advocacy for our clients, but this was quite obviously in regards to US. We like our jobs, yes? We like funding and support, yes?

There were probably 15 people present at this lecture. 10,000+ attendees at the ASHA Convention. Fifteen people who wanted to learn more about how to protect our jobs, advocate for ourselves, and interact with people who can make or break us.

Now, I get it. We go to ASHA to learn how to best support our clients (oh, and to see our best CSD buddies). Holding the client paramount – this is our duty. But how can we hold our clients paramount if we don’t have the IDEA/ESEA/Medicare/Medicaid funding to do it? How can we hold our clients paramount when our professions are being threatened by a poor economy and an administration that doesn’t acknowledge our existence? How can we hold our clients paramount when our credentials aren’t universally recognized as a benchmark for licensing and other professional standards? This presentation was two hours. Two hours out of your three day ASHA schedule could have been dedicated to learning how to stand up for yourself and your colleagues.

We have to help ourselves, to help our clients (kind of that whole “Put your oxygen mask on first” thing.) And I would guess that 15 people can’t do it all. We cannot continue to assume that someone else will get to it. We cannot continue to run our professional lives with a “want something done – give it to a busy person” philosophy. We are ALL busy but, we are ALL accountable.

Want to know more about advocacy, for you and your clients? Contact ASHA-PAC. Contact your state association. Go to the ASHA website.  Contact your SEAL.  Contact your State Liaison. Become a Grassroots Captain. Start early by encouraging students, interns, CFs, and newbies to get involved! There are a million resources and you can get to them while you sit in your office chair.

Listen, I’m not saying run for president or Occupy ASHA – just don’t stand by. Do what you can, or at the least support people who are trying. While you’re thinking that someone else may do it, someone else may be thinking that YOU will do it.

I loved every second of the ASHA Convention, and I hope when I attend in the future that I see more presentations about government relations – and I hope to see more of you there.

NP: The Zombies – Time of the Season

 

(Samantha is one of the official ASHA Convention bloggers! Stay tuned for more insights from her and the other bloggers before, during and after convention.)

 

Samantha Weatherford, B.A., is a second-year, speech-language pathology graduate student at Missouri State University in Springfield, MO.  She writes about speech-path and grad school on her blog, so to Speak. Does she think it is a coincidence that the first ever ASHA Convention was in St. Louis, MO, her beautiful hometown, and she chose to be an SLP? NOPE. FATE.

If you are younger than 80 this post is for you

“Last call for Sunday dinner. If I don’t hear from you via FB or phone by  11 AM tomorrow I’ll take that as a no.”

Direct quote: My Grandma

Source: Facebook

My Grandma, Dee, is 76 years old. She unplugs the computer when it freezes  up (Dee, seriously, stop that). She always thinks someone is hacking her  account. She doesn’t want a phone with a camera. She is one of my most favorite humans on the Earth.

And…she Facebooks. She likes, comments, posts, tags, shares, LOLs, calls my mom her “BFF” –  she is a Facebook machine. A champion of Facebook, if you will.

76. Facebook. SEVENTY-SIX.

When ASHA-goers (who are younger than 76) have seen my “I Tweet” sticker it  has induced reactions of:

  • Camaraderie: “You tweet? Me too! What’s your handle?”
  • Judgment: “Oh. You tweet. (accompanied by ‘the face’)”
  • Awe: “You tweet? Coooool!”
  • Confusion: “You tweet. Whatsa tweet? Have I been twitting and didn’t know
    it?”

But they, and you, CAN TWEET! Among other things! It is not so hard! I PROMISE.

When I got on Facebook in 2006 it was about collecting friends, like Pogs or Pokemon (gotta catch ‘em all!). Who has the most friends? Who has the most tags?  Who likes the best bands? Who has the funniest quotes? – I think it has maintained that stigma so people have generalized this time-suck to ALL social media. This is an outdated view of social media, and it ages you when you act like you’ve never heard of “the Twitter.” While social media can still be used for silly, superficial functions (as well as being used to majorly creep on people), it and other sites, can be used for so much more.

Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Google Plus, Hipster-Underground-Sites, blogs, ASHACommunity. These sites are used to facilitate sharing, educating, learning, AND (you CSD professionals should like this one!) COMMUNICATING.

Tonight in the West Terrace, Maggie McGary helped get all the #slpeeps and #audpeeps (people who use social media to share CSD information) in one place for the annual Tweetup. We didn’t do anything earth shattering, but it just goes to show that social media is slowly, but surely, proving that it can bring people together. As a profession we support communication and interaction! We are all coo-coo for cocoa puffs over apps and AAC. So why are we so scared of other technological avenues for communicating?

With the advent of smart phones, iPads, netbooks, wifi, and goodness knows what else – using social media is easy as a touch. With one finger. THE TIP OF ONE FINGER. A LIGHT TOUCH WITH THE TIP OF ONE FINGER.

I want to challenge all of you to use social media in SOME WAY this year. Advocate. Connect with your state or national associations. Advertise. Find a common ground with a client. Get to know an #slpeep. Share an interesting link. Then maybe next year we’ll see YOU at the Tweetup!

PS – I’m at the Hostel at Fifth and Market and I had 12 minutes of Internet. I wrote this by hand. OLD SCHOOL.

PPS- I’m addicted to ASHA. I’m never leaving. I will be continuing the conference after you all leave. You’re welcome to join me.

NP: I”ll Find a Hearing Aid for Ya

(Samantha is one of the official ASHA Convention bloggers! Stay tuned for more insights from her and the other bloggers before, during and after convention.)

 

Samantha Weatherford, B.A., is a second-year, speech-language pathology graduate student at Missouri State University in Springfield, MO.  She writes about speech-path and grad school on her blog, so to Speak. Does she think it is a coincidence that the first ever ASHA Convention was in St. Louis, MO, her beautiful hometown, and she chose to be an SLP? NOPE. FATE.

 

Tips for Making the Most of the ASHA Convention

 

This year is the 75th Annual American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Convention.

There will be 12,000+ people there. 300+ exhibits. 1000+ poster presentations.  700+ oral seminars. 32 short courses. Don’t forget about the First Timers’ Orientation, the Awards Ceremony, and NSSLHA Day Events! Oh and breathing and eating and sleeping!

…I’m feeling a smidge overwhelmed.

Just a smidge.

So, I thought to myself, “Self, how on earth are you going to handle all this business?” And the answer was clear.

Ask other people.

Man, I love other people. Other people have so much knowledge and they can be so darn helpful. Other people are the best.

So here is what other SLPs said when I spastically asked them, “What is your favorite part of ASHA Conventions? What do you look forward to most? What tips do you have for ASHA first timers? How do I get to be like you when I grow up? Do I have anything in my teeth? What day of the week is it? Do you know my name? Because I forgot. What was I asking you again?”

Guys, grad school is rough.

Anyway,

What is your favorite part of ASHA Conventions?

  • “Probably my favorite part was going out for pizza with our professors.”
  • “I love the  Honors ceremony—for the Honors and their recipients, in particular the Annie Glenn award, being able to hear Annie or John Glenn, and the amazing recipients–James Earl Jones, Ben Vereen, Julie Andrews, Joey McIntyre to name a few!  How wonderful it has been seeing them and hearing them present to us.”
  • “Seeing old friends and colleagues–we ended up scattered all over the country.”
  • “Technical sessions and poster sessions are some of my favorites–nice to have the opportunity to hear new findings, and visit with the presenters as well.”
  • “My favorite part is definitely the Awards Ceremony.  When they show the videos of the people who are getting the Honors, I almost always cry.  Of course, given my stage of life, it’s becoming more common for them to be friends and colleagues so that makes it really special! For example, this year Marc Fey and Gloria Kellum are getting the Honors, and both of them have been important mentors to me throughout my career.”
  • “I love hearing the Fellows announced because they represent the present and future of the association.”
  • “It’s great to see the Editors’ Awards and hear about the impressive research that’s going on in our field.”

What tips do you have for first timers?

  •  “Get to the meetings early!  Sometimes the rooms fill quickly, and there will be fire code limits of how many people can be in the room.”
  • “Look at handouts before you go—it really helps you prepare for the sessions.”
  • “Wear comfortable shoes!”
  • “I wish so badly that I had really studied the lectures being offered and chosen ahead of time exactly what I wanted to go to!  I was pretty overwhelmed the first time, and that led to going to some lectures I didn’t exactly enjoy.  I also avoided some of the longer ones, just because they were long, when they might have been super interesting.”
  • “Don’t just go to what your friends go to!  It’s nice to have people to go to lectures with, but sometimes you have to branch out on your own if you want to see something interesting.”
  • “It’s okay if it gets stressful and you don’t want to sit in lectures all day for three days straight.  Take a break, take a long lunch, go shopping.  You’re in San Diego for goodness sake!”
  • “Stalk the SLP Celebrities!”

Do I have anything in my teeth? What day of the week is it? Do you know my name?

  • “Surprisingly you brushed your teeth this morning – congratulations. Today is Friday. Your name is Samantha. Have fun in San Diego.”

 

NP: Going to California – Led Zeppelin

 

(Samantha is one of the official ASHA Convention bloggers! Stay tuned for more insights from her and the other bloggers before, during and after convention.)

 

Samantha Weatherford, B.A., is a second-year, speech-language pathology graduate student at Missouri State University in Springfield, MO.  She writes about speech-path and grad school on her blog, so to Speak. Does she think it is a coincidence that the first ever ASHA Convention was in St. Louis, MO, her beautiful hometown, and she chose to be an SLP? NOPE. FATE.