@speechroomnews Speaks Out on #ASHA14

Jenna

I went to my first ASHA convention unsure of what to expect. I knew CEUs, exhibit hall swag, Orlando sunshine and lines at the ladies restroom were certain. While all these were true, the most important parts of the conference for me were friendships and renewed energy.  Throughout the convention you might have seen daily hash tags used to discuss and promote daily happenings. They turned out to be a good marker of all the different parts of my trip as I reflect on the weekend.

#asha14roots: I’ve only been an SLP for five years, so my roots don’t grow very deep in this field yet. At the conference, I got to hug clinical supervisors and undergraduate friends. Lunch with a fellow Ohio University Bobcat made me thankful for all the people who have played a part in my SLP history thus far.

#asha14branches: Branching out was my favorite part of ASHA. Specialist from all over the country taught the CE courses. It’s something you just can’t get at your local courses. Listening to sessions about hands-on research happening in different parts of the country got me so excited about the growth in our field. I look forward to following the results of the various projects funded through grants or universities.  In the exhibit hall, I got to put a face to the many names I email throughout the year. Although apps are nothing new, I was really impressed with the increasing level of complexity in new apps.  It’s not much of a secret that I love speech therapy materials. I have a closet-full at work and a closet-full at home. The exhibit hall had a variety of new materials. There is something special about a speech therapist that makes a tool that works for her clients, who then turns that into a business to make materials available for other professionals.

#asha14leaves: I’m leaving ASHA with some excellent plans for my preschool caseload. I’m going to increase my use of informational text and increase multi-step play routines to develop language within one level of play. I love leaving sessions with specific ideas for next week’s therapy.  I’m leaving ASHA with new networking connections. I did some planning with Yapp Guru to talk about cataloging app reviews.  I’m leaving with new ideas about Social Thinking from Michele Garcia Winner’s sessions. Most importantly, I’m leaving with new SLP friends. Sometimes being the only SLP in your building can feel isolating. Being amongst 12,000 fellow professionals has made me remember that I have connections all over the world. Our job is a unique blend of science and arts. The convention renewed my excitement for our field and my fellow SLPs. See you next year in Denver!

 

Jenna Rayburn, MA, CCC-SLP, is a school-based speech-language pathologist from Columbus, Ohio. She writes at her blog, Speech Room News. You can follow her on FacebookTwitter, Instagram, and Pinterest.

 

ASHA 2014, Here I Come! It’s GO Time!

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Usually, the word scheduling elicits shivers down my spine. Usually that means scheduling 60 kids into speech therapy slots without interrupting ELA, math, lunch, recess, music, PE, art, intervention, OT or PT. It’s an astronomical feat when SLPs complete schedules every year. In contrast, scheduling for ASHA 2014 in Orlando has been a breeze. I’m scheduling lunch dates, meet ups, pool time, and my favorite CEU opportunities! Scheduling for #ASHA14 in Orlando is very different from scheduling therapy clients.

 

I’ve booked my flight. I’ve texted friends and worked out transportation. I’ve got a place to stay! I’ve joined up with some of my blogging buddies and reserved a booth for the exhibitor hall. Most importantly, I’ve started picking out a schedule for the courses I will take in November. I am so looking forward to downloading the mobile app this year. Since most SLPs don’t have time to wait in line for three days for the new iPhone 6, I’m hoping my dinosaur 4s phone will make it until November. The app should make managing my conference schedule a snap.

 

The Program Planner has been an easy way to browse for courses. It’s more user-friendly than my IEP writing program and my Medicaid billing programs. You can browse through courses by keyword, author, title, etc. So far I’ve searched for topics that apply directly to my caseload. My search terms were “school,” “autism,” “evaluation,” “preschool,” “apraxia” and “AAC.” Here are seven sessions that I’ve chosen so far:

 

  1. I really think research is valuable and there is just so much to choose from. I am trying to pick courses that relate directly to me or courses that really excite and interest me. In my current job I’m doing two preschool evaluations per week. I’m having the ‘articulation, phonology, and apraxia’ conversation with parents every week as I explain characteristics of each and their differences. The presentation “Differential Diagnosis of Severe Phonological Disorder & Childhood Apraxia of Speech” by Matthews and Rvachew sounds like a great refresher. I’m hoping to find some more evaluation-specific courses before November.
  2. I’m thinking the Phillips, Soto, & Sullivan presentation called “Strategies for SLPs Working with Students with AAC Needs in Schools” sounds perfect for a lot of my caseload. I need strategies for AAC students so this should be a big help.
  3. I can’t wait to see “iPad to iPlay 2: Teaching Play to preschoolers through Apps” from Tara Roehl. I love my iPad so I can’t wait to see how she is using it to teach play in preschoolers. This is really a skill I’d love to pass on to my teachers and parents.
  4. On the other hand I’m always careful to limit screen time with my students. There is a presentation called “The Impact of Technology on Play Behaviors in Early Childhood“ from Hagstrom, Smith, Witherspoon. Hopefully once I listen to both presentations I’ll feel good about balance and not leave feeling conflicted!
  5. Michelle Garica Winner is presenting four times. I’m hoping to catch “ASD Treatment: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy & Mental Health Problems Associated With Social Learning Challenges” and “Implementation Science & Social Thinking®: Discovering Evidence in Our Own Backyard”. I love her work and just can’t wait to finally see her present in person.
  6. Barbara Fernandez from Smarty Ears is presenting about one of her apps for data collection and caseloads. I can’t wait to talk to her about all the new Smarty Ears apps coming out in the future so I’ll be hitting up the Smarty Ears booth.
  7. Lastly, I decided to search my schools to check out what the faculty at Ohio University and The Ohio State University are presenting. “Skiing, Horseback Riding, & Communication With Individuals With Complex Communication Needs: Experiences From Community Volunteers” sounds really interesting from McCarthy, Benigno, and Hajjar at Ohio University. They are presenting information on recreational activities for individuals with complex communication needs. Interviews were conducted with volunteers in adaptive sport programs in New England.

 

I don’t think we will have any typical celebrities at ASHA. At least not the kind you see on entertainment television every night. There will however be some #SLPcelebrities to be found! I searched two of my favorites to check when they will be presenting. Hopefully you’ll see me posting a #slpselfie with some of my favorites SLPs over the weekend in Orlando.

That initial scheduling took about 30 minutes and I didn’t have to email 20 different teachers. Scheduling for ASHA is way more fun than making a therapy schedule. Now the countdown begins!

 

 

Jenna Rayburn, MA, CCC-SLP, is a school-based speech-language pathologist from Columbus, Ohio. She writes at her blog, Speech Room News. You can follow her on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Pinterest. Jenna is one of four guest bloggers for ASHA’s convention in Orlando.

Favorite Resources: Fiction and Non-Fiction Texts

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School based SLPs often look to align their intervention goals with academic content standards to increase student success in the classroom. Many of these goals align with English Language Arts standards. Goals for vocabulary, comprehension, and articulation can be targeted easily using fiction and non-fiction texts. Using reading passages is a perfect way to support reading skills and curriculum. It’s also an easy way to incorporate current events or seasonal information as well. I wanted to share four different resources I used for my caseload this year.

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1. Newsela.com
Newsela is a site that takes regular news articles and changes the lexile level for a variety of readers. You can select the article, then pull it up on your screen. On the right side of the screen you can select a variety of lexile levels from 3rd grade up to the regular adult version.This is perfect for mixed groups.
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I love to use it for middle schoolers reading at lower lexile levels.
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We also use these in my articulation groups. This 7th grade student went through and highlighted each /r/ word.
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As he reads the page, I marked each sound with a +/-. Then we go back and work on the words he missed. This resource is free.
2. ReadWorks.org
ReadWorks is another fantastic free resource. I love their units for seasonal reading. Sign up for a free membership. You can search using the calendar at the bottom of the home page. There are resources for Kindergarten and up.
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They even have whole units for free for common books you already have on the shelf! Take time to search through and find units that are made to teach specific skills.
3. ReadingA-Z.com 
Many  districts pay for teachers and SLPs to have access to ReadingA-Z.com. I use it a lot and would recommend it to any SLP working with school aged students. I also have access to VocabularyA-Z. Let me show you some favorite resources within it.
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Leveled books used to be the meat of ReadingAZ. Lately they have added a whole lot more, but these are still my Go-To!
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Once you open a leveled book, you have many options. Print the book, share on a Smartboard, or print additional worksheets.
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I love the vocabulary connections most of all.  Since we have a subscription to VocabularyA-Z there are sets of  vocabulary lessons for EVERY BOOK!
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This is such a huge time saver for me. It takes the planning out of vocabulary practice!
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There are special lessons for ELL/ESL. These are great for language learners and for daily living skills units.  There are printable books that focus on feelings, vocabulary (vegetables, money, etc.), and places (neighborhood, school).
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The website also includes decodable books.  They are divided by sounds and even blends. These are  great for articulation practice.
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One section of ReadingAZ features comic books. Lots of my reluctant readers /language delayed  kids love comic books.
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The last feature I frequently use is the write your own story books. Most of the lower leveled books are available in the ‘write your own’ format. You can either print the regular book or print the wordless book. This is an easy way to progress monitor a variety of grammar and narrative skills. Of course it’s great for direct instruction, too! If you’re working on retell you can read the story with the words first and then use the ‘write your own’ version to support retell.
ReadingAZ is a paid subscription. Look into the free trial if you haven’t used it before.
4. N2Y.com
News-2-You is a symbol based weekly newspaper. It’s my ‘go-to’ for daily living skills classes and autism classrooms. I love the predictability and the symbol support. You can also download many levels of  instruction.
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This is the ‘regular version.
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The simplified version has less text.
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This is the ‘higher’ version (but still not the highest offered.)
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Did you know they have a spanish edition?
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I love the pre-made communication boards and the recipes included. I use the app frequently with my students.N2Y is a subscription based program. You would not be disappointed if you purchased it. I promise!
Those four resources are websites I use every week to support my instruction.  SLPs can use them as part of their instruction or as a way to provide homework, align their intervention goals with academic content standards in order to increase student success in the classroom.

Jenna Rayburn, MA, CCC-SLP. is a school based speech-language pathologist from Columbus, Ohio. She writes at her blog, Speech Room News. You can follow her on facebooktwitter, instragram and pinterest.

Top 12 Pearls of Wisdom For SLP Newbies

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You’ve done it! Congratulations! Six years of school, countless clinical hours, and the Praxis. Now that it’s time to start your first job as a speech-language pathologist. Your first job will teach you all those things you didn’t learn in graduate school. After my first few years, I’ve reflected on the most important lessons I learned and here are the top twelve:

1. Be kind. Be kind to everyone! Everyday. Learn everyone’s names. Thank your secretaries, clerks, and custodians as many times as you can. Don’t underestimate the amount of help they will give you!

2. Go out of your way to connect with families. There are many reasons this is important. You won’t get the full picture of your student’s life if you don’t know something about their family and their life outside the school day. Your parents will be much more likely to buy-in to your homework plans and carryover if you’ve made a personal connection with them.  Lastly, you are taking care of their baby (the most precious thing to them in the whole word). If you’re working with their 3-year-old they will feel so much better if they know who the heck you are!

3. Don’t procrastinate. You’ll need help and there is no getting around that.  If you are writing an IEP at home at 9 pm for an 8 am meeting and then the printer doesn’t work, you won’t have time to make other arrangements.

4. Be a team player. Bite the bullet and volunteer to do things that take extra time. If you have a talent use it to help others. For example, whipping up visuals is super easy for me. Even when a student isn’t on my caseload, I often make up data sheets or visual posters to support students going through our RTI team. Your team will appreciate your talents and you will be able to ask your team to help you with their specific talents.

5. Think generalization from day one. Ask your student’s teacher what is the ONE thing you can work on to make the biggest difference in the classroom.

6. If you make a mistake, admit it, and find a way to solve it. Then don’t make that mistake again. You’re going to make mistakes, just be gracious when you do.

7. Ask for help, but do your own research first. Your co-workers and administrators will be willing to help as you get to know the paperwork. If you can do the research yourself and spend the time to try to solve problems yourself before you check in for help.

8. You aren’t done learning. Get involved with ASHA, blogs, conferences, whatever it takes. When a kiddo comes along and you haven’t seen that disorder before, get busy researching.

9. There’s nothing worse than being out of compliance or completing paperwork incorrectly. Your supervisors might not see how great your therapy is everyday, but the minute you’re out of compliance they will notice. The ‘take home message’… get organized early. Double check your dates and get with your teachers, clerks and intervention specialists. Get yourself organized before you get busy decorating that cute therapy office!

10. Advocate for all things speech and language in your buildings. You might even need to advocate for new ideas within the SLPs in your district. Speak up when you have a good idea, but remember that you’re new. Sometimes it pays to be quiet and listen to what seasoned SLPs have to say. They seriously know so much.

11. Document, document, and document. Remember, if you don’t document it, it didn’t happen.

12. You’re just one fish in the sea. Remember that when it comes to scheduling, therapy time, etc. everyone needs ‘time’ with the students. Work with your team. Just get over the fact that you think you’re done with your schedule the first time. It will change monthly if not weekly.

The best part of being a speech language pathologist is that you’re never done learning. You’ll get new interesting children added to your caseload, be challenged to use new technology, and collaborate in ways you never thought you would. By this time next year you’ll be able to make your own ‘top 12’ list of valuable lessons.

Jenna Rayburn, MA, CCC-SLP. is a school based speech-language pathologist from Columbus, Ohio. She writes at her blog, Speech Room News. You can follow her on facebook, twitter, instragram and pinterest.

Turning Pinterest Boards Into A Therapy Activity!

If you follow me on Pinterest, you might notice I use it A LOT. A few weeks ago PediaStaff started creating boards with pictures to be used in therapy. They made boards with action pictures, pronouns, problem solving, inferencing and concepts. As soon as Heidi emailed me and told me about them, I knew I could adapt them for speech therapy on the iPad. I figured it would be way more entertaining than printing them all out! About the same time, I won an app called TapikeoHD. After playing with it for a while I realized it was perfect for the PediaStaff Pinterest boards. Let me show you what I came up with!

The app I used is called Tapikeo and available at this time for $2.99 in the app store. Tapikeo allows you create your own audio-enabled picture books, storyboards, audio flashcards, and more using a versatile grid style layout. Check it out for yourself in the itunes store here.

First I opened Pinterest on my iPad and decided I would make an activity working on labeling verbs. I opened their board for actions words.

Then I saved the pictures to my ipad by holding down on them to save.

Next you will head on over to the app and start a new grid. When you click on the empty grid square you will get a screen like this. If you want text to accompany your photo/audio (and I did because I want to support literacy skills!)  you can type that in at the top. I type ” The boy is ___.” Then select ‘browse’ to add the photos you just saved to the iPad. Then select record. For my grid I saved my voice reading “The boy is.” When I use it with younger students, all they need to do is name the verb. For older students working on full sentence generation – I can turn the sound off and they are responsible for developing the whole sentence.

Once I finished adding all my cards (it took me about 5 or 10 minutes) the board looks like this.

When the student clicks on one of the pictures, it expands to fill the screen and the audio/visual joins the picture. This is when my students identified the verb or created a new sentence!

There is also an ‘e-book’ setting where the app transfers your pictures into more of a slideshow like setting. I kept mine on the grid formation so I could work on receptive language skills at the same time. I had the students pick their picture a few different ways: by following directions with spatial concepts, by answering WH questions, or by listening to clues and making basic inferences.

These boards are easy to make in the app and PediaStaff has done most of the work finding all these great images. What other topic boards would you like to see PediaStaff create?

(This post originally appeared on Speech Room News)

 

Jenna Rayburn, M.A., CCC-SLP is a school based speech language pathologist from central Ohio. She is a graduate of The Ohio State University. Jenna is the blogger at SpeechRoomNews.blogspot.com, sharing fun treatment ideas and technology tips. Visit SpeechRoomNews on Facebook.