Heidi’s Top Blogs

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Editor’s Note: In her daily work at PediaStaff, Heidi is Editor-in-Chief of the popular PediaStaff Blog for pediatric and school based therapist, and also created the PediaStaff’s Pinterest Site  for therapists and parents of special needs children.  The company’s continuing work to educate, share resources with, and support the special needs community has been featured on Parents.com, and Love That Max, (an award-winning special needs blog).   In addition, PediaStaff was profiled by the well-regarded social media blog, The Realtime Report, for their innovative work.

 

In the past few years, the internet has exploded with speech-language resources, largely due to the ease of publishing one’s thoughts through a blog. When I wrote a piece on SLPs blogging back in 2012, most clinicians had no idea that this wealth of knowledge was out there. Today however, blogs are everywhere and they are widely known as a great place to get specialty information on virtually every topic.

Anyone who has ever blogged will tell you that regular blogging is a time-consuming commitment that demands ongoing diligence. A successful blogger needs to write insightful, informative posts at least two to three times per week. Blogging usually starts for most as a fun way to get your ideas out there. A year later, when the “newness” has worn off, contributing to your blog evolves from a “want-to” to a “have-to,” and then unfortunately often to a “Do I really need to?” task.

A good many of the blogs we featured in our first article no longer exist. Fantastic clinicians have just decided that the time it took to consistently share the excellence they practice was just too much of a drain on professional and personal time. Thankfully, a new crop of bloggers have recently come in to fill some of the gap left behind.

Others, have gone the route of making their blogs a way to supplement their income. If I am going to invest this much energy in blogging, why not sell some of my great ideas? After all, school speech surely doesn’t pay very well. The advent of Teacher Pay Teacher, has enabled many extremely creative school therapy clinicians to share their ideas and earn themselves a nice secondary income to boot.

In this article, I selected only blogs that are not offering their own products for sale. There are so many creative SLPs doing this now, that I would never be able to choose.

Here are some of my personal favorites (in alphabetical order) of those bloggers sharing all of their insights, opinions, tips and activities free of charge:

Almaden Valley Speech Therapy Blog – While I do not personally know the author of this blog, I find her posts, mostly on pronunciation, quite interesting.

ASHAsphere – You’re here. Need I say more?

Bilinguistics Blog – This blog focuses on bilingualism and issues facing clients with multicultural backgrounds. Highly recommended.

Chapel Hill Snippets – After years of giving away substantial resources—especially printable books and Boardmaker share activities—Ruth Morgan has finally bitten the bullet (her words) and opened a TpT store. While she is selling a few things now, I wanted to share her blog for the enormous collection of free resources she has amassed and still offers for your use.

Doyle Speech Works – A new blogger, Annie Doyle muses mostly on professional issues facing SLPs. Insightful, fresh and enjoyable.

Erik X. Raj – Erik is one of the most creative SLPs I have had the pleasure to meet. Funny and full of spot-on ideas to engage kids, this blog never fails to inspire.

Language Craft – Lucas Stueber is especially good at sharing ideas that inspire boys to enjoy speech-language treatment. In addition, he has some excellent profession insights. While he hasn’t been blogging often lately, the entries he posts are definitely worth a read.

Play on Words – Sherry Atemenko – is an expert on reviewing books and toys through a speech and language lens. A very valuable blog, indeed.

PrAACtical AAC – A perennial favorite, this blog specializes in augmentative and alternative communication and does a mighty fine job of it.

Speech Adventures – Mary Huston always has something interesting to say, even though the number of posts she writes has slowed down this past year. Whether she is reviewing apps, talking about commitment to the profession or just musing, her blog is definitely worth a subscription.

Speechie Freebies – This is the one primarily Teacher Pay Teacher oriented blog in this article. Every post offers something free and generally printable to use in the classroom or clinic. And while, each contributor does also sell their wares on TpT, the offerings on Speechie Freebies are always free and often substantial. If you are interested in bloggers that offer their ideas on TpT, Speechie Freebies is a fantastic way to explore them.

Speech Techie – If you’ve been to an ASHA convention in the last few years and are interested in how technology can be valuable in SLP practice, you have heard of Sean Sweeney. It’s a top-notch blog with the awards to prove it.

Happy reading!

 

Heidi Kay is one of the founding partners of PediaStaff and is the editor-in-chief of the PediaStaff Blog, which delivers the latest news, articles, research updates, therapy ideas, and resources from the world of pediatric and school-based therapy. PediaStaff is a nationwide, niche oriented company focused on the placement and staffing of pediatric therapists including speech-language pathologists.

The Best Speech-Language Pathologist Blogs from ‘A to Z’

Editor’s Note: In her daily work at PediaStaff, Heidi is Editor in Chief of the popular PediaStaff Blog for pediatric and school based therapist, and also created the PediaStaff’s Pinterest Site  for therapists and parents of special needs children.  The company’s continuing work to educate, share resources with, and support the special needs community has been featured on Parents.com, and Love That Max, (an award-winning special needs blog).   In addition, PediaStaff has been recently profiled by the well-regarded social media blog, The Realtime Report, for their innovative work on the Pinterest social media site.

 

Author’s Note:   I would like to thank the following speech-language bloggers for contributing to this article:  Activity Tailor, All 4 My Child, Future SLPs, Play on Words, Speech Lady Liz, and Speech Room News.

 

The number of Speech-Language Pathologists blogging and engaging in social media grew steadily in 2011. Those of us who are active on Twitter (we call ourselves the #SLPeeps), have been sharing articles and resources on blogs, Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. Recently though, the new social media kid on the block, Pinterest, has made it easier than ever for SLPs to engage each other and share ideas. And with all the sharing going on, it has given bloggers a new place to network their ideas and find inspiration for new ones. While I am not sure exactly if there is causality, it seems that Pinterest is inspiring SLPs to jump into the blogging world. We have counted at least nine brand new SLP bloggers since the first of the year and all of them are also on Pinterest.

I was recently speaking with Maggie McGary, ASHA’s Social Media guru, and we started talking about how great it would be to survey Speech-Language bloggers and compile a short-list of ‘must follow blogs’ for both SLPs and their clients.   Sean Sweeney has compiled a great list of blogs in the SLP Blog Bundle, but he doesn’t have a list of exactly who is in there, nor does he describe them anywhere one by one. So, since we have relationships with a great many of the regular speech and language bloggers already through our blog at PediaStaff, I mistakenly thought that I was well-suited for the job of compiling a ‘Best Blogs’ list. I emailed our contributors with a straw poll of sorts to get their votes for the best speech and language blogs in each of several areas. I waited patiently for results, and planned how I would deliver the findings to you in this column.

The results? Well…. The moral of this story is that there isn’t a short list! There are now a dizzying number of blogs to follow and most of them are definitely worth reading. What’s more, our respondents found it impossible to rank as “better” or “best” because they all have their own flavors and angles.

After the ‘best laid plans,’ fell through, what emerged was a list of the active blogs that were submitted as favorites, ordered from A to Z , plus some that are brand new that deserve notice.   In order to make this list, the blogs needed to meet the following criteria:

  • written by a speech-language pathologist or current graduate student
  • currently active
  • writes about (or shares resources on) speech language topics at least once a week (preferably more)
  • directed to either clinicians, parents and caregivers
  • has good ongoing continuity without multiple periods of inactivity in the past
  • professional and well edited for spelling, grammar, etc
  • shares more general resources and news than it does information on their own products or services

It is important to note that note that neither PediaStaff nor any of the contributors to this list specifically endorse any of these bloggers, nor make any claims to the clinical competence of the authors. In fact, a few of these bloggers keep their full names to themselves to protect their privacy, so we have no way of verifying if they are who they say they are. Please make your own informed decision as to the effectiveness/appropriateness of what these clinicians are sharing.   I know this is by all means not a conclusive list (especially since new great new blogs seem to be popping up like daisies!) but as of  March 2012, the following are the speech and language blogs that PediaStaff and our colleagues recommend that also meet the above criteria:

Activity Tailor – Kim Lewis, M.Ed, is a private practitioner working in school settings.  Her lovely blog includes easy, creative treatment activities and private practice tips. I especially like her clever seasonal ideas and occasional commentary pieces.

All 4 My Child – This Edublog finalist for best new blog offers book reviews, searchable by goal or theme with activities for use to meet therapeutic goals. This site also shares uniquely collaborative therapy ideas, experiences and musings related to social interaction written by co-treating SLPs and OTs.

ASHASphere – You are reading it now.   Definitely a “greatest hits” blog with tremendous articles for speech and language clinicians daily!

Becoming Olivia SLP – Olivia is a graduate student in Canada chronicling her experiences as an SLP student in video log (vlog) format. She is full of energy and creating quite a bit of chatter for herself amongst the ‘SLPeeps.’

Chapel Hill Snippets  – Ruth Morgan is a school-based clinician who highlights her “assorted observations both in work and play.” Her blog is insightful and well-written. Ruth’s free therapy shares (often downloadable books) are especially popular and well done.

Child Talk – Becca Jarzynski, who specializes in autism, writes a wonderful speech and language therapy blog for parents/caregivers that should not be missed. Her articles offer concrete ideas for parents to help their child communicate during “everyday life.”

Cindy L. Meester’s Blog – An oldie but a goodie, Cindy Meester’s blog has been extremely popular with SLPs since before blogging (and reading blogs) was trendy. While she blogs about all sorts of topics, she was recognized by the Edublog Awards as a finalist in the Ed Tech category.

Early Intervention Speech Therapy – Stephanie Bruno Dowling has a well-known blog on Advance for SLPs and Audiologists. It is unique among the blogs on this list in that it is only one of a few that specialize in Early Intervention.

Eric Sailers’ Blog – Eric is a former school-based clinician who blogs about technical applications for SLPs. He is also the creator of several apps including ArticPix.

Erik X. Raj, Speech Language Pathologist – Erik is a creative SLP, best known for former blog ‘ArticBrain’ which shared how to really engage kids in speech with humor and talk of ‘boogers’ and bugs! He is also blogging on Pocket SLP.   His current blog is a video blog.

Hanna B. gradstudentSLP – is a brand new blogger who has come onto the SLP blogging scene just in the past eight weeks. So far, she has made some very nice (and quite frequent) posts on a variety of school-based topics.

In Spontaneous Speech – This blog was recommended to us recently by several bloggers that speak highly of Cindy. We have started following her and suggest that you check her out as well.

If I Only Had Super Powers  – This blog is another “oldie but goodie” that has been around since long before blogging was popular. Although we have not gotten to know this blogger personally, she is on our ‘must read list.’

Jill Kuzma’s SLP Social & Emotional Skill Sharing Site – Jill works with students with Asperger’ Syndrome and other high functioning students with social and emotional needs. This blogger is well-respected among her peers in the industry and her blog has much to offer.

Let’s Talk Speech-Language Pathology – Brand new in February of 2012, this is a student blog with some nice potential. We are looking forward to reading her thoughts and ideas.

Little Stories – Kim Rowe’s parent oriented blog is new to us, but was recommended to be in this list by our colleagues at All4MyChild. Based on what we have read so far, it seems to have some great resources and insights for caregivers of young children with speech and language delay.

LiveSpeakLove – Another brand new school-based SLP blogger, Lisa at LiveSpeakLove, is an SLP in the Baltimore County Public Schools. She has creative activities and offers up a bunch of great Boardmaker shares, often with a seasonal bent.

The PediaStaff Blog  – I feel a bit awkward including our own blog in this list, but the contributors to this article insisted that I mention it. With posts up to five times a day, the PediaStaff blog aggregates and presents a collection of the clinical articles, treatment ideas, and news. Our staff combs over 100 therapy blogs, websites, and news wire feeds daily,  to ensure that PediaStaff readers receive the best information available as it is happens and is written.

Play on Words – This unique, ‘must-read’ blog focuses on toys, games and books that facilitate language development. Sherry Artemenko writes excellent book and product reviews, and also offers up specific ways parents can sneak speech language therapy practice into family fun time at home.

Playing with Words 365 – We discovered this blog through Pinterest. SLP blogger Katie is also certified in ABA. She has a well developed blog that, although written for parents and caregivers, is quite popular among her peers in the profession.

Say What Y’all – Here is yet another brand new school-based SLP blog with great promise. Clean and fresh, Haley Villines’ blog has a modern and creative feel that is echoed by her excellent articles, so far.

Speech Gadget – ‘Deb T., SLP’s’ blog features a variety of articles on books to use in speech language therapy, tools, websites, apps and other online resources. On hiatus for a bit, she seems to be back in action with regular (and excellent) posts and tips.

The Speech Guy – Quite active in the #SLPeeps community on Twitter and Facebook, Jeremy Legaspi, SLP, writes primarily about technology. His articles on worthwhile apps, interactive websites, and technology are definitely worth reading.

The Speech Ladies – This mother and daughter team has an excellent school-based blog full of colorful posts, creative ideas and free downloads. Highly recommended!

Speech Lady Liz – Liz Gretz is a second generation SLP with a great deal of energy and creativity. Her blog is oriented to parents and professionals alike and features tons of colorful, culturally relevant activities that the kiddos can get excited about. She is also very active on Pinterest.

Speech Room News – Young and full of energy, school-based SLP Jenna Rayburn posts fresh, fun activities to promote speech and language goals. New last year, the site was awarded First Runner-Up among in the Edublog 2011 awards in the ‘Best New Blog Category.’ PediaStaff is proud to have made the initial nomination of Speech Room News for this award.

Speech Techie – Sean Sweeney is no stranger to technically savvy (and wanna-be technically savvy) SLPs. He is a regular presenter at both ASHA and Boston University on using technology for Speech and Language therapy. This blog is a must read and is a past EduBlog first place winner in the ‘New Blog’ cateogory.

Speech Time Fun – “Miss Speechie” is also a brand-new and already prolific young blogger. Her posts are full of colorful, creative and fun ideas for the classroom.  She is active on Pinterest and often modifies ideas she finds there through a speech/language lens.

Sublime Speech – The explosion of creative new speech blogs continues with Sublime Speech. Lots of ‘Do It Yourself’ activities with free downloadable versions of her creative and ‘hip’ creations! Another one to watch!

Talk It Up Speech Therapy – Ashley Dyer McGeehon’s ‘Talk it Up’ is another brand new one to watch online. A school-based SLP, her ideas are current, interesting, and engaging.

Therapy App411 – This new group blog, also an Edublog nominee, is a collaborative effort of several of our favorite therapy bloggers. The aim is to review smartphone and tablet apps through a therapy lens. Is a must follow for SLPs interested in using smartphones, tablets and technology in the clinic and classroom.

There are several other blogs that I would like to offer honorable mention to that didn’t meet all our criteria.  For the most part they are just not posting often enough  (how dare those student bloggers pay more attention to their classwork than their blog!) or have taken too many extended breaks from blogging.   Please be sure to check out:  2 Gals Talk About Speech Therapy, Cree-zy, Crazy Speechie, Easy Speech and Language Ideas, Future SLPs, Geek SLP, Heather’s Speech Therapy, Landria Seals’ Blog, The Learning Curve, Lexical Linguist, Mommy Speech Therapy, Pathologically Speaking, and The Speech House

 

Heidi Kay is one of the founding partners of PediaStaff and is the editor-in-chief of the PediaStaff Blog, which delivers the latest news, articles, research updates, therapy ideas, and resources from the world of pediatric and school-based therapy. PediaStaff is a nationwide, niche oriented company focused on the placement and staffing of pediatric therapists including speech-language pathologists.


 

Interview Tips

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Photo by Javrsmith

This blog post will help you prepare for interviews and improve your chances of landing a great job. Please note, that while some of the advice offered here may seem obvious to you, it might not be obvious to everyone, and we would rather share things that sound basic rather than omit something that we assume you know.

These tips are provided for your consideration for both direct hire positions as well as contract assignments. Although a contract job is not a “commitment for life,” the employer conducting the phone or face to face interview will be looking for a strong indication that you are committed to the position you are being considered for and that you are truly interested in their district. Many interviews for contract jobs are done strictly by telephone, and as such are often perceived by the candidates as less important as an interview that takes place face to face. In fact, the opposite is actually true. A telephone interview may be your only chance to make your best impression. It is much more difficult to get the “real you” across by phone, so you need to make the most of every minute by preparing ahead of time.

BEFORE THE INTERVIEW:

Research the employer in advance. Learn specific details about the organization, the department, and specifics about the job so that you may be as informed as possible about them. Most of this information can be found on the organization’s website or by “Googling” them and reading articles you find online. If you are working with a recruiter they should be able to help you collect much of this information, but whatever else you can learn on your own will only serve to help you even more. For example:

  • Size – the number of clients served, and if it is a school based position, the number of schools, administrators or managers.
  • Recent awards and honors the company, district or organization has received.
  • Reputation – How is this employer or school district perceived in the city/town compared to others.
  • Administration – a visit to the school or company website will generally lead you to current news and information about the organization.
  • The makeup/census of the caseload – What are the economic, geographic, cultural and socioeconomic factors for the families that you will be serving. If the employer is a school district, is it growing or shrinking?
  • How big is the department? Number of therapists? Number of administrators?
  • Total number of clients/students served – Is the caseload growing or is there attrition?
  • If a school, how are the children served? Are the students served through a pullout model? Are therapy sessions done one on one or in groups?

SPECIFIC JOB QUESTIONS TO HAVE ANSWERED BEFORE THE INTERVIEW:

  • Why is the job available?
  • Exactly where is the position located?
  • What will be the population and makeup of your particular caseload?
  • Is there a supervisor over your area or will you report directly to the Director or Assistant Director?
  • How many hours am I guaranteed (or can I expect) per week?
  • Is paperwork done by computer or manually, and will I be provided with all the tools I need to succeed?
  • Email address of the interviewer so you can send him/her a “thank you” note.

All of this will not only create a stronger image of you in the interview, but likewise will provide you with a better basis for evaluating the opportunity if an offer is made.

FOR THE PHONE INTERVIEW:

  • Schedule a time where you can give the interviewer your undivided attention.
  • Keep the interview “clinical” and focused on the job duties. Other, more general questions can be answered by your recruiter or through your research.
  • Don’t talk about money yet. If you are working with a recruiter, they will have that information for you. If you are interviewing on your own, get through the interview first and follow up with human resources for salary information.
  • Let the interviewer ask his or her questions first to ensure that the interviewer covers all that they want to learn about you. If there is time, feel free to ask job related questions.

FOR FACE TO FACE INTERVIEWS:

  • Getting there: Have good directions and allow plenty of time to get there.
  • As a starting point, it is critical to understand that the impression you make in the first few minutes of the interview generally sets the tone for your success or failure for the entire interview.
  • Dress conservatively; avoid bright colors. Make sure hair is clean and neatly styled. Avoid perfume and cologne but make sure you wear deodorant to control perspiration and odor.
  • Be exceptionally courteous to everyone you meet.
  • Even if you’re having a bad day, put on a smile and show your enthusiasm for the job. Many hiring decisions involve more than one candidate. Personality and motivation are often tie-breakers.
  • If you want the job, ask for it. At the very end of the meeting say why you’re excited about working there and that you’d like to have the position.

 

Heidi Kay is one of the founding partners of PediaStaff and is the editor-in-chief of the PediaStaff Blog, which delivers the latest news, articles, research updates, therapy ideas, and resources from the world of pediatric and school-based therapy. PediaStaff is a nationwide, niche oriented company focused on the placement and staffing of pediatric therapists including speech-language pathologists.

Resume Preparation Tips

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Photo by bpsusf

(This blog article has been adapted for ASHASphere from the “PediaStaff New Graduate Guide.”  Click here to download the entire guidebook.)

A resume is a “living” document that will grow with each new job and professional experience. That said, it should concisely and effectively describe and sell your most relevant credentials. An employer will spend very little time reviewing your resume, so it must be clear and targeted for the type of job you are applying for. You may have more than one resume with different objectives. Don’t be afraid to “toot your own horn” because if you don’t, nobody will!  Beware of typos and grammar errors as these will leap right off the page.  Remember, this may be the only time you get to make an impression on an employer!

Before Writing the Resume:

  • Compile your educational experience. This will include all degrees you have completed or are in the process of completing, as well as relevant courses and seminars.
  • Catalog all your work experience such as your clinicals, therapy-related jobs, and positions working with children (special needs as well as typical). Also include jobs which demonstrate your leadership and interpersonal skills whether they are speech related or not.
  • Make a list of your honors, scholarships, academic and community achievements.
  • Put together names of all of the professional and community organizations to which you belong.
  • Choose three references who will speak highly of you (check with them first). Get their full names, titles, phone numbers, and email addresses. Also ask them how they prefer to be contacted.
  • Create a record of publications and papers you have written and presentations you have given.

Writing the Resume

  • At the top of the resume put your name, address, phone number(s) and email address. Only include references to blogs or social networking sites if they are exclusively used for work. We also recommend that you open a free account just for your job search. Gmail or Yahoo are great for this.  Also, make sure the voicemail message on the phone number you have listed is clear, professional, and states your name.
  • Declare your objective, the type of job you are looking for, and the population you wish to serve. This should be short and general. Do not close the door on any type of job you might have an interest in. Create a second resume if you find that your possible career objectives don’t work well in one document.
  • Create your educational information section. Working with most recent first, list the schools, city, state, year of graduation and the degree earned (or expect to earn).
  • Write your experience/work history. List this experience in reverse chronological order. Include title of job and use descriptive action words to describe your duties and responsibilities. Examples are “achieved,” “communicated,” “recommended,” “provided,” etc. Avoid passive verbs like “have written” or “was selected.”
  • Add a section for publications or papers you have presented, if relevant.
  • Create a section for any honors you have achieved. These honors should include academic, civic, and any other awards you may have received in the community.

After Writing the Resume

  • Show the completed document to a trusted friend, professor, or peer who can proofread it, look for things you may have missed, and help you with any areas of confusion.

Heidi Kay is one of the founding partners of PediaStaff and is the editor-in-chief of the PediaStaff Blog, which delivers the latest news, articles, research updates, therapy ideas, and resources from the world of pediatric and school-based therapy. PediaStaff is a nationwide, niche oriented company focused on the placement and staffing of pediatric therapists including speech-language pathologists.

The SLP New Graduate’s Timeline for Success

Road to Uluru

Photo by Jo@net

(This blog article has been adapted for ASHASphere from the “PediaStaff New Graduate Guide.”  Click here to download the entire guidebook.)

We’re sure you’ve heard the old adage that “Timing is Everything!”  This has never been truer than as you take the next step toward becoming a Speech Language Pathologist. This blog article will help you navigate what we like to call the “road map to success.”

At the Beginning of Your Degree Program:

  • Create a favorites folder in your computer browser where you can start to catalogue the various websites of job search and clinical resources that you will come across.
  • Start ‘networking socially’ specifically for your profession. For example, join Twitter and follow the “#SLPeeps” hashtag, join the ASHA LinkedIn group, and if you are going to work with kiddos, the Pediatric and School Based Therapy group on LinkedIn.
  • Subscribe to all professional newsletters and blogs you can find relevant to your course of study. Many of the not-for-profit organizations that specialize in specific communications disorders have robust newsletters that contain information-packed articles and current news items. SLPs are prolific bloggers! Sean Sweeney of the Speech Techie blog has put together a great Blog Bundle of 17 bloggers that blog about speech-language pathology topics.
  • Begin preparing your professional resume. List all pertinent class work, projects, awards, publications, and workshops you’ve attended. Also include para-professional employment and volunteer work if applicable. Use bullet format please. This is a work in progress!
  • Since I am not fond of “Don’ts,” here are a few “Do’s” for you to consider when beginning your search:
    • Do post your resume…but limit where and how many…YOU take control of your job search.
    • Do choose your recruiter carefully…the right one is your “best friend and ally” in your search.
    • Do stay focused on what’s important now….your clinical experience and preparing for your professional exam.

In the Final Year of Your Degree Program (6 months from graduation):

  • Continue working on items in the section above.
  • Begin the process of identifying your location preferences and communicate them with the recruiters you’ve identified and others who you have asked to help you with your search.
  • Set up a separate email account (Yahoo, Gmail, etc.) for ONLY job search related issues. Keep it professional! (For example: jsmithslp@yahoo.com, or sjonesslp@aol.com)
  • Update your resume. Include all clinical work…quantify whenever possible (worked with 8 students at John Jay Elementary School…list diagnoses and treatment used.)

Three Months from Graduation – During your Clinical Fieldwork

  • Same as above. Begin to narrow down your employment preferences.
  • Definitely start connecting with a recruiter that you trust in your area to discuss job prospects, specifically one that will customize a search for you.  Establish and convey your availability for phone and face-to-face interviews to that person or persons.

Two Months from Graduation

  • Schedule your PRAXIS exam if you have not already done so.
  • Make sure you update your resume to include clinical affiliations and resend to everyone that you previously sent a copy.
  • Develop a reference list – Ask your references for permission so they know you’re listing them, and ask each for a written reference, these are sometimes helpful.
  • Build a schedule of available times for phone interviews and visits with prospective employers.

One Month from Graduation (Oh my Goodness, it’s Getting Close!)

  • Continue to conduct interviews as needed.
  • Begin licensure research, review requirements for the state(s) you are interested in.
  • Develop plans for relocation (if necessary).
  • Finalize your resume with graduation, professional exam results, and any articles published or continuing education taken.
  • You should be in weekly contact with the recruiter(s) that you are working with.
  • Be sure to have your relocation plans in place to include cost of relocation.

We highly encourage you to plan for some down time for yourself! It is important for you to begin your new career rested, refreshed, and ready to tackle the challenge ahead!

Heidi Kay is one of the founding partners of PediaStaff and is the editor-in-chief of the PediaStaff New Graduate Guide [PDF], and the PediaStaff Blog, which delivers the latest news, articles, research updates, therapy ideas, and resources from the world of pediatric and school-based therapy. PediaStaff is a nationwide, niche oriented company focused on the placement and staffing of pediatric therapists including speech-language pathologists.