Writing an Article for Special Interest Group Perspectives

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You’ve never contemplated writing a research article since you left college, right? Perhaps writing in your field was something someone else did? No time, interest, or motivation to pursue such a professional endeavor? If you have a passion for your work, you can write that article if you simply approach it in steps. Start with your topic and what would you like to share with colleagues. It could be a therapy approach, new information about a specific population, or facilitating your documentation. Start compiling information through your search engines such as Google Scholar and ASHA’s research databases. Start bookmarking abstracts and articles on your topic. You’ll discover there are many facets that you never considered–bookmark those too. As you gather information, you’ll learn more about your subject.

The next step is to paste your facts or paraphrase them from your abstracts and articles including your article’s bibliography into a Word document. You’ll notice there are sometimes two, three, or more authors on a specific facet to your topic. This document will be your working template and will give you a basic framework for your article. Your next step is to review and revise your template into a readable paper. As you edit your paper, you’ll find yourself moving portions of your research from beginning to end, omitting data, and going back to your search engine to pursue that one piece of information you’d like to add.

Once your paper is assembled, ask a colleague to read it to see how the paper flows in form and style. Read it again and revise it again. Now it’s ready to be sent to your Perspectives Editor (find the editor for any Perspectives publication under the heading, “Information for Authors.” Example: SIG 15′s Information for Authors.).

My first article I sent off came back with so many revisions and corrections that I felt like I was back in English 101. I felt deflated and intimidated. My issues included simple grammatical errors, citation omissions, spelling and sentence fragments. The only way I was going to get this information out was to fix my mistakes and improve my first draft. You will feel like giving up. I would recommend that you avoid working on it when you encounter a difficult section, but keep chipping away at it. You will ultimately be rewarded for your efforts, learn a great deal about your topic and professional writing, and have the satisfaction to know you’ve written your first article.

My editor taught me a lot about professional writing and surviving the process of editing and revision. I kept my first draft with revisions to document my growth as a writer and researcher.

Once your revisions are completed, read it again, and ask your colleague to read it again. You’re almost done. You now need to write your article’s abstract and submit five questions about your article’s content for continuing education credits for other SLPs. You can do this!

I want to take this opportunity to acknowledge my colleagues who encouraged me to attempt my first article: Ann Kulichik, owner at AK Speech, past SIG 15 Associate Coordinator who inspired me to write; Joanne Wisely, Vice President, Regulatory Administration & Compliance for Genesis Rehab Services, who reviewed my articles and encouraged me to keep writing; Grace Burke, Senior Director of Adult Day Services at Life Senior Services, who was the previous editor of Perspectives and guided me through my first article with patience and professionalism and Anna Feezor, Senior Clinical Specialist at Genesis Rehab Services and present Associate Editor for SIG 15 Perspectives. Thank you!

George A. Voyzey, M. Ed., CCC-SLP, is a speech pathologist for Genesis Rehab Services at Maine General Rehab and Nursing Care at Glenridge in Augusta, Maine, a 125 bed skilled long-term care facility specializing in Alzheimer’s and other dementia care. Mr. Voyzey also serves as a Master Clinician in the area of dementia, a clinical instructor and mentor. He recently had his fourth article published for ASHA’s Special Interest Division 15 (Gerontology) on-line publication, Perspectives, and serves as a coordinating committee member for SIG 15. Mr. Voyzey received his Master’s degree in Communication Disorders from Pennsylvania State University in 1983.