#ASHA14 Audiologist in the House

blogI have been attending the national ASHA convention since 2008 in Chicago, but this year is a special first for me–MY FIRST ASHA CONVENTION AS A CERTIFIED DOCTOR OF AUDIOLOGY!!! I started attending ASHA as undergraduate while still trying to determine if I wanted to study audiology or speech-language pathology. As an undergrad, ASHA was a little overwhelming. The graduate school fair and exhibit halls, as well as the many networking events, were greatly beneficial, but as I still didn’t have a concrete plan or field, my choice in sessions was eclectic and I don’t know how much I got out of them.

The next several years I served on the NSSLHA Executive Council as a delegate for Region 8 and then as a representative for Region 3, and even though I was “at convention” I was very busy with meetings and helping run NSSLHA Day and as such, didn’t get to many sessions. The networking has always continued to be phenomenal and I loved being emcee of the NSSLHA Battle of the Regions Knowledge Bowl, but I was missing out on sessions.

Last year, as a fourth year extern who was free of meeting and other responsibilities, I was finally able to attend as a regular attendee and found some great sessions (which after three-and-a-half years of grad school, I could understand), but this year will even top that as I now have a job as an educational audiologist and can search out sessions related to what I do on a daily basis.

I always look forward to continued networking and social events as well as the exhibit hall. I’ll be sure to check out Audiology Row, the opening plenary session and closing party (Where’s my owl with a letter inviting me to Hogwarts?). As I’ve been researching audiology sessions, I selected so many sessions and posters that were of potential interest that I’ve only got two slots that don’t have conflicting sessions. I’m working on whittling the list down, but there are some sessions I feel I need to catch. Management of School‐Age Children With Hearing Loss: From the Clinic to the Classroom (#1019) is one I feel will be particulary relevant. As I’m learning the ropes at my new job (I’m the only educational audiologist in a rural four-county area of Maryland), I’m rapidly discovering that regular follow-up with dispensing/managing audiologists is not something that always happens with my students due to geographic and socio-economic issues. As such, I’m starting to develop relationships with some of the audiologists at the Children’s Hospital a couple hours away where many students were initially fit.

I’m also looking forward to some sessions and posters on APD as working in the school, it is a “hot topic.” Disentangling Central Auditory Processing (CAP) Test Findings: A Road to Greater Clarity (#1110) , Differential Diagnosis & Intervention of Central Auditory Processing Disorders (#1405), and Treatment Efficacy of the Fast ForWord-Reading Program on Language in a Child With SLI/APD (6036 poster #136).

One final session I’m also very excited about is Noise Exposure & Noise-Induced Hearing Loss Among Rural Adolescents (#1492). The area in which I live and work has agriculture and aquaculture as two significant components of the local economy in addition to many recreational opportunities for noise exposure (hunting, shooting, ATVs, boating, etc) and I feel there will be opportunities to work on implementing some hearing conservation education at the high school level for many of the students I serve.

What are some of the sessions you’re looking forward to? See you in Orlando!

Caleb McNiece, AuD, CCC-A, is a new grad and educational audiologist for the Mid-Shore Special Education Consortium which serves four county school systems on Maryland’s eastern shore. Caleb is a former NSSLHA Executive Council member and is passionate about audiology students, audiology advocacy, pediatric audiology, and private practice.

Don’t Procrastinate, Advocate!

Rotunda at the U.S. Capitol, Washington DC

Photo by Tadson

The typical student in Communication Sciences and Disorders wears many hats. These may include student, clinician, graduate assistant, and about a million others that vary from person to programs, alike. One hat, which should be worn by all CSD students, is that of an advocate for our profession.  Sometimes, as students, it may feel as if our voices get lost in the cacophony of noise in the professional world.  There are over 12,000 members of NSSLHA. If we come together, our voice can be heard and we can make an impact on the future of our profession. It is never too early to begin advocating for the careers and the clients we will spend a significant portion of our lives helping.

TODAY, September 19, is NSSLHA’s 2nd Annual Virtual Advocacy Day! Virtual Advocacy Day provides a mechanism for students to learn just how easy it is to become an advocate. Through this event, and others, we are establishing a way for all NSSLHA members to learn how to correspond with their elected representatives at both the state and national level. Coming together, our message will become loud, and make our voices heard. This will benefit the profession at large and the patients whose lives we impact. Imagine the impact of senators and representatives receiving hundreds of e-mails all on the same topic during the same day. This will certainly peak the curiosity of a legislative assistant whose grandmother recently had a stroke, or nephew was just diagnosed with autism. During the Executive Council’s “hill visits” in the spring, we have seen firsthand the impact of educating the members of congress.

This year, there are three key national issues we are stressing: IDEA Funding, Medicare Therapy Caps, and the Hearing Aid Tax Credit Bill. More information is available about each of these bills at the ASHA Advocacy Center. You can also search for local legislative issues relevant for an individual state. Professionals, we encourage you to join with us for this day of advocacy. Collaboration between students and professionals is critical. You serve as our role models and mentors and we will one day join you as peers in professional careers. We encourage you to stand with us and write your elected officials as well!

You can participate in 5 simple steps:

  1. Visit the ASHA Take Action Center.
  2. Select the “Students Take Action” link to view additional information on key issues.
  3. Edit the letter to your liking. The more personalized information and stories you provide the more effective the communication.
  4. Enter your contact information in the fields to the right of the letter. Based on your address, the system will automatically identify your members of Congress. Make sure to identify yourself as a student and insert your school name.
  5. Select “Send Message” and you’re done!

 

Caleb McNiece is 3rd year doctoral student in Audiology at the University of Memphis. He received his B.A. in Communication Sciences & Disorders and Spanish from Harding University. He is a trainee on the US Department of Education funded project, “Working with Interpreters,” at the University of Memphis. Caleb serves as the Region 3 representative to the NSSLHA Executive Council chairing the Social Media Committee and as President of the University of Memphis NSSLHA Chapter.


Rene Utianski is a Doctoral Candidate in Speech and Hearing Science at Arizona State University and a Research Collaborator at Mayo Clinic-Arizona. She received her B.A. in Speech and Hearing Science and Psychology from The George Washington University and her M.S. in Communication Sciences and Disorders from Arizona State University. Rene serves as the Region 9 Regional Councilor on the NSSLHA Executive Council and is the 2012-2013 Council President.