Tricks to Help Speech Lessons Carryover into Daily Life

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How can our clients better incorporate new skills into their speech in their daily lives? It seems that they are often limited by their social interactions with caregivers, parents or spouses, so that they can’t practice or complete speech homework between sessions.

Some of my adult clients will avoid practice sessions with their spouses altogether. How can we encourage use of newly acquired skills between visits? Wouldn’t the duration of therapy be reduced and functional communication improved? Research has supported more intensive therapy approaches to promote a more efficient, complete healing process. Because time and funding often limits therapy frequency, we send patients home with work for practice. Follow-through with homework generally rests on the motivation of the client or the client’s family. We need to find ways to make the therapy process efficient and functional.

In Pam Marshalla’s 2010 book “Carryover Techniques (in Articulation and Phonological Therapy),” she defines the term carryover are referring to “a client’s ability to take an individual speech skill learned in the therapy room and to apply it broadly in all speaking situations.”

Getting our students and clients to use their articulation and communication skills outside the therapy environment requires that we begin the process of carryover as soon as the skill is demonstrated in a variety of environments. For children, it might mean saying a fluent word or phrase during a game to get to the next square, or using the correct production of /r/ and /l/ during a short conversation about sports. For adults, the rules of learning after a stroke or traumatic brain injury still may require learning a new skill, like writing the first letter for phonemic placement or using cognitive-semantic linking to ask for coffee.

We need to get more creative to promote carryover across all our clients because of additional sensory, physical, psychological or cognitive difficulties that may impede the process. Charles Van Riper in 1947 wrote that while we cannot rush carryover, we must facilitate its progress.

Pam Marshalla listed some functional ways to promote carryover in children and adolescents, including use of:

  • Fill-in sentences or fill-in stories to stimulate spontaneity.
  • Idioms to stimulate spontaneity.
  • Negative practice to help break the incorrect speech habit.
  • Nonsense syllables and words to strengthen the carryover process.
  • Over practice to cause a hyper-awareness of the goals of therapy.
  • Rapid-fire questions and answers to promote naturalness.
  • Reading aloud as a step between word productions and conversational speech.
  • Rhyming to capture a client’s attention and encourage practice outside of therapy.
  • Riddles because they cause a client to combine practice material with creative thinking.
  • Shortening productions to encourage naturalness.
  • Singing to help children remember their speech work and to encourages effortless practice.
  • Spelling out errors to help the client think about what she is saying and how she is saying it.
  • Story-telling and re-telling to cause stimulate spontaneity and to cause a breakthrough in carryover.
  • Tongue twisters to teach children how to control their articulation.

More on promoting carryover in speech-language treatment can be found on Pam Marshalla’s website.

Many of these techniques are useful for adults as well as children. Here are some additional carryover ideas for adults:

  • Create a script to practice at a favorite restaurant.
  • Use the carryover phrases and substitute other items at a counter deli or a department store.
  • Make a to-do list (or grocery list) each day. Practice writing and reading.
  • Talk about the programs you will watch.
  • Use carryover phrases for conversation, such as, “Hi. How are______?” “What is____?”  “I’m _____.” “Who is____?”
  • Use a calendar and an 8 by 10 dry-erase board to practice drawing,writing and gesturing.
  • Use your smart pad, apps, whiteboard, AAC, text-to-speech, and speech-to-text to send emails and do alphabet board, speech tutor and naming practice.
  • Play your favorite brain games daily. They will help you with focus, learning, word-finding and memory.

If you encourage your clients to engage in games and functional activities daily, the overall quality of your clients’ understanding and speech production will improve because you are encouraging the growth of new neural connections. Your clients are naturally acquiring and using the new skills in their daily lives because they are using them. Becoming more functional can be the most motivating effect of carryover.

 

Betsy C. Schreiber, MMS, CCC-SLP, is a clinical supervisor at Ladge Speech and Hearing Clinic at LIU/Post on Long Island, and a partner at Hope 4 Speech Associates, P.C. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Groups 2, Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, and 18, Telepractice.

 

Helping Clients With Aphasia Retrieve Words—On Their Own

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“I can’t hear it!” This was said by Mrs. A, a 67-year-old woman with aphasia, who actually hears fine. What she meant to say is that she can’t recall the sequence of sounds to express a particular word or idea. When we have that tip-of-the-tongue loss of a name, how do we try to remember it? What strategies are we using to get to that word that we can’t remember?

Our success depends on our ability to hunt and gather—and on the number of neural connections we can tap into to access the information. These skills are cognitive, not simply learned operantly.

In my last blog post, I talked about establishing cueing hierarchies and functional activities for our adult clients. This post looks at using the cueing hierarchy to stimulate the rewiring process. Sometimes I think that I am a sort of electrician rather than an SLP. I work on finding the connections based on observed behavior from evaluations or activities (like writing, gesturing or drawing) that require least intervention.

How do we develop these skills? How can we teach strategies for short and long-term functional success?

Sometimes, we spend the therapy session working on the most disabled aspects of the communication disorder: comprehension, word retrieval, writing and reading. But if we don’t tap clients’ best abilities to foster some success, and if we don’t address whether they are continuing to practice these skills outside the therapy room, how will compensatory skills, adaptive skills and new connections work for them?

Let’s look at Mrs. A, who said, “I can’t hear it.” She was telling me about the very connection that she lacks due to her aphasia: re-auditorization. She can’t hear the words or the phonemes that make up the words in what I call “her mind’s ear.” If given the first phoneme, or a carrier phrase, she almost always names the word. She is able to write the word about 75 percent of the time but can only read it aloud about 30 percent of the time. She will often be able to speak complex multisyllabic words or a short phrase when discussing a topic. Auditory and reading comprehension is 75 percent for paragraphs. She is very intact cognitively, but her affect varies emotionally from congenially engaged to depressed and angry.

She is about two years post-stroke and has an all-in-one AAC that she doesn’t use. Our goals must address her frustration by establishing immediate successful compensatory strategies for communication. Then we need to build skills that will help in the rewiring, so that she begins to cue herself. The rewiring will be difficult here because she doesn’t link the phoneme to the letters she is able to write. But if she can write the word and then read it aloud more often, she can develop a clear strategy for verbalization that will reduce her frustration.

We will begin by simply reviewing phonetic placement in monosyllabic words. I like to use real words—which have semantic value—rather than nonsense syllables. Consonant-vowels alone don’t work as well as consonant-vowel-consonants that mean something. Mrs. A started relearning that a /b/ means that the lips come together when starting a whole word like “beer.” We chose beer for the visceral, emotional connection it has for many people. We talked about when she might drink beer, such as at a baseball game, which lends itself to picture assistance to boost cognitive links. We initially used a mirror to model the placement while sitting next to her. We highlighted the first letter and said it with her. She saw the picture, then wrote the word.

Mrs. A can now produce the whole word “beer” after seeing a picture of it. Looking at the Cueing Hierarchy, we have moved from most clinician involvement to independent self-cueing for this phoneme. She is moving on to more phonemes rapidly so that we may not need to review every letter after a period of time. Mrs. A. is beginning to generalize the link to other sounds. New neuro-behavioral links and relinks are helping her associate the orthographic letter with a physical movement and the sound that is produced. New cognitive links and self-cueing has begun!

Next, she will need to use the strategy in controlled conversation and small groups to increase her comfort level and functional use outside of treatment. This is a big hurdle. Families and caregivers are crucial players and need to be instructed how to encourage communication without frustration. When possible, teach the caregivers and families how the strategy works. They will use it more readily at home and will see how it can work in a variety of situations, such as in restaurants.

Another client, Mrs. C, had a similar functional ability to write but not verbalize. With time, she was able to trace the first letter in the air to cue herself to say a word.

In both cases, skills that had been present were improved, then used to create a compensatory strategy for functional communication. We must teach our clients strategies for improving the scope of their communication without our cues, using their own strategies, thereby making them more independently functional. While available strategies are unique to each client, they usually take the form of low tech gesturing, drawing, writing, even circumlocution.

We want our clients to be learning and improving communication dynamically. If we always fill in all of the sentences or speak for them, they cannot make their own connections. When allowed to use strategies independently, they then blossom, not only communicatively but socially.

Betsy C. Schreiber, MMS, CCC-SLP, is a clinical supervisor at Ladge Speech and Hearing Clinic at LIU/Post on Long Island, and a partner at Hope 4 Speech Associates, P.C. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Groups 2, Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, and 18, Telepractice.

Speech Therapy and Aging: Brain Plasticity and Cueing Hierarchies

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Given our knowledge of the plasticity of the brain, are we as clinicians or caregivers, able to help to develop new links with a behavioral model, by using gradated cueing hierarchies?  Could this low-tech and pharmaceutical-free form of treatment  have neurologically based implications for rehabilitation and adaptation in communicatively challenging settings?

Perhaps more testing with fMRI scans may be necessary to really prove the theory. Therapy approaches using cueing models have been well documented in the literature in speech therapy treatment for aphasia.  However, the way we use clinician originated cues can help create new links and expedite a broad area of cognitive and linguistic improvement, or maintain the functional status quo, unless we analyze the kinds of cues we are using and the amount of independence we are carefully eliciting from the client.

By looking at each task and cue needed on a continuum from simple to complex, concrete to abstract, you can construct a grid of where on the continuum the client functions and how you can provide a cue or help them provide their own cues for success.

The idea that the damaged axons and dendrites in the brain are looking for connections and stay active when the brain is activated, prompted me to want to create a cueing continuum (see http://carmichaellab.neurology.ucla.edu/integrated-view-neural-repair-after-stroke.) On the theory that the client can develop new pathways , if we always fill in the missing word or provide the first phoneme, then the client will never have to learn where to get it, via their own written word, for example.  But how do we get from writing the word for the client to having the client write the word in the air and say it? It all depends on the residual abilities, but the concept can be applied to everyone.

We have a 60 year old gentleman with TBI who is learning how to semantically cue himself to find a word. Initially, he had severe speech and cognitive impairments. Now, in conversation, he often uses circumlocution to get his point across. However, sometimes specific words are warranted, and this is difficult for him. He can sometimes spell the word aloud even though he cannot speak it. We had him do this several times with great success. Our next task was to remind him that he could do this to help himself.  Later we only asked him what he would like to do.  We are helping him build those dendritic links ( and learn to use a skill) by carefully reducing the amount of clinician prompting or cueing during the sessions and writing down the strategies for him to practice at home. Although there are many approaches to cueing, none of them seem to describe cueing in a continuum from most invasive to most independent. Many clinicians describe the cues as semantic or phonemic.  I found that there were nuances in cueing that I had learned over the years to allow the client to gradually become independent. When I had difficulty transmitting these ideas to my students, I created a loose continuum to mark where our clients fell given specific objectives, and how we could get their neurons to get closer together behaviorally if not actually by breaking the cues down.

Along with the goals we establish for our clients, no matter their abilities, we must always be evaluating their behavior and trying new materials and varied activities to facilitate language.

As we converse with others, we derive cues from the environment and from the people with whom we are speaking (that is part of the reason why conversation amongst the adult neurologically language-impaired looks better than when we test them by looking for specific words and longer utterances).

Our goal with cueing is to develop self-cues and elicit more language. A self-cue can be as basic as a gesture or a drawing, but if the client is doing it and communicating to me what he did for the weekend, then he has been successful. Often when the stress is lower or the focus is away from speaking, the words and incidental phrases flow more freely. The best reward is to see the expression on our client’s face when he says a few words effortlessly because he was engaged in the activity. But this is not we what we are trying to do. We are trying to give him real tools for those times he cannot utter a word.

When the client leaves the therapy room, we want him or her to be able to use their own skills, rather than rely on others. Since they may not be able to develop their own means of self-cueing, we include self-cue skill development as part of the therapy plan.  The client may or may not have the ability to provide his or her own cues, yet. But throughout the therapy and rehabilitation process, we work toward the skills of self-cuing no matter the level, such as writing, gesturing, drawing pictures, and talking about the item or activity with words that are available.

The Cueing Hierarchy Continuum is by no means linear, but will generally go from simple and most dependent to complex and independent. They follow the behavioral branches that may be used in clinic therapy logs. They are separated on my behavior grid in 3 categories: Clinician Assisted Cues, Clinician prompting (or reminding the client to use a strategy) and Self Correcting. This approach requires that the client learn about his strengths and how to implement them to improve what we would consider weaknesses. By identifying which cues are more dependent, we can be cognizant of allowing the client to work at a documented realistic level achieve the objective.

It is well documented that there is enough plasticity in almost any brain to stimulate, heal and renew brain function after a stroke or TBI. For cognitive loss during normal aging, the dementias and the progressive dementias, there is less clear documentation for which approaches are the most effective and pragmatic for our clients. However, similar principles can be used to establish functional objectives along with the family and caregivers.

How to develop skills? How to develop strategies for short and long-term functional success?  Sometimes, we spend the therapy session working on comprehension, word finding, writing and reading using a variety of materials.  But, if we don’t address what they are learning outside the therapy room, which they may visit one or two times a week, how will compensatory skills, adaptive skills and  new connections be utilized?   That will be the topic for next month’s post.

Betsy C. Schreiber, MMS, CCC-SLP, received a BA in Psychology and MMS Master of Medical Science in Speech Pathology from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. Her CCC was earned during the 3 years she worked at Hitchcock Rehabilitation Center in Aiken, South Carolina where she had the opportunity to learn about NDT and Sensory Integration with the original, Jane Ayres, working with LD and CP children and neurologically impaired adults. She is currently a clinical supervisor at Ladge Speech and Hearing Clinic at LIU/Post on Long Island, and a partner at Hope 4 Speech Associates, P.C. She has also served as an ASHA Mentor and hopes to participate in ASHA’s  Political Action Committee in the coming year. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Groups 2, Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders, and 18, Telepractice.

Speech Therapy and Aging: Implications for Our Approach to Communication Disorders

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This post is the beginning of a monthly series by Betty Schreiber, M.M.S. CCC-SLP, on Aging, Communication, Cognition, and Speech Therapy.

Thank you for allowing me to be a new blogger on ASHASphere. I currently supervise Graduate Students at the Ladge Speech and Hearing Clinic at LIU/Post in Brookville, New York. Along with my wonderful business partner, Gail Weissman MA. CCC-SLP, and amazing programmers at Objectgraph LLC, I am also creating Apps designed specifically for our older clients.

As I am at the younger end of what would be considered the “baby boomer” generation, and currently working with adults who have begun to age and suffer communication disorders, I am particularly sensitive to the effect of aging and the social impact of communication disorders amongst this population.

As people get older, it is a fact that health and physical mobility are crucial elements in their ability to function in daily life, interact, and participate normally in society. Even older people who have simply aged with no other issues experience increasing isolation. Their spouses and friends move or pass away, leaving fewer opportunities for social interaction.

The baby boomers are aging and will become a large part of the population in the next 20 years. The Center for Disease Control in collaboration with the Merke Company Foundation has developed information on aging in America with a state by state assessment.

They listed 15 key indicators of older adult health:

  • Physically Unhealthy Days
  • Frequent Mental Distress
  • Oral Health: Complete Tooth Loss
  • Disability
  • No Leisure-Time Physical Activity
  • Eating ≥ 5 Fruits and Vegetables Daily
  • Obesity
  • Current Smoking
  • Flu Vaccine in Past Year
  • Ever Had Pneumonia Vaccine
  • Mammogram Within Past 2 Years
  • Colorectal Cancer Screening
  • Up-to-date on Select Preventive Services
  • Cholesterol Checked in Past 5 Years
  • Hip Fracture Hospitalizations

These factors have an impact on our aging family members ability to attend the therapies they need, maintain cognitive function, communicate and be self-sufficient. The majority of our elderly prefer to stay in a familiar environment even if it means living alone or with some outside help.

According to the United States Department of Health and Human Services Profile of Older Americans 2011, about 29% (11.3 million) of noninstitutionalized older persons live alone (8.1 million women, 3.2 million men), almost half of older women (47%) age 75+ live alone. The number of Americans aged 45-64, (I’m in that batch) who will reach 65 over the next two decades increased by 31% during this decade. Over one in every eight, or 13.1%, of the population is an older American. This demographic information along with changes in the federal budget and insurance reimbursement should be of concern to us, as professionals. Not only in terms of how we will make a living, but how will we be able to provide needed support and efficient services so that treatment approaches do not have to cost more money. Therapy can be more effective if we address communication and interaction within the framework of the aging living situation as a whole.

In one of the blogs on our website, I told a story of my own family experience. My grandmother, who was about 83 at the time, was placed in the middle of the livingroom while family and friends spoke to each other around her. (I was about 26 and a SLP for 3 years) She was able to hear well enough, and speak well enough, but the attitudes of the younger people were such that unless she made a ruckus, no one felt it was necessary to include her in the conversation! This isolation while surrounded by a bustling family, negatively affected her attention to her surroundings.

Part of my therapy approach with adult clients is to educate and include the families and caregivers in the therapeutic process as much as possible. Our family questionnaire includes questions such as: How many times do you talk to (our client) during the day. We also ask about the client’s speaking interactions at home or in a group of people. I have found that some family members want us to “fix” their husband or wife and want no additional responsibility. But we can talk to them to help them slowly understand that their situation will be better if they are aware of how they can help and use the adaptive tools we are giving them. We are not asking them to do the therapy or practice. We help them with resources in our community and teach them about paired communication and listening. The families, caregivers, even SNF staff should be encouraged to develop a communication routine that allows interaction not mere reaction.

There will be more on this topic in subsequent postings. Any of the Indicators of Older Adult Health frequency may impact our therapy attendance and reimbursement. What does this mean in terms of available services, advocacy, health care coverage, families and caregivers education/training? How can we, as Speech Language Pathologists recognize and support individuals and families in distress and facilitate communication awareness, not only with our clients who are coming for therapy, but for our aging population as a whole?

Betsy C. Schreiber, MMS, CCC-SLP, received a BA  in Psychology and MMS Master of Medical Science in Speech Pathology from Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. Her CCC was earned during the 3 years she worked at Hitchcock Rehabilitation Center in Aiken, South Carolina where she had the opportunity to learn about NDT and Sensory Integration with the original, Jane Ayres, working with LD and CP children and neurologically impaired adults. She is currently a clinical supervisor at Ladge Speech and Hearing Clinic at LIU/Post on Long Island, and a partner at Hope 4 Speech Associates, P.C. She has also served as an ASHA Mentor and hopes to participate in ASHA’s  Political Action Committee in the coming year.