What It Takes to Get SLPs and Teachers Working Hand-in-Hand

SLPscollaborate
Lately, I feel there is a division between classroom teachers and speech-language pathologists in the schools: an “us” and “them” mentality. Working parallel to one another hoping to reach the same goal is not what is best for our students. While it is true that the professions are separate, they do share a goal—student progress. I believe collaboration is the key to achieving that mutual goal.

Here are a few of the most common situations in which SLPs and teachers have opportunities to collaborate for the benefit of students, and some tips for those situations.

When a student begins to receive speech-language treatment.

The SLP can:

  • Offer a few minutes to sit down with teachers and walk them through the student’s IEP. Explain the terminology, how speech-language treatment goals will be addressed in the therapy room, and how the classroom teacher can help to target those same goals when the student is in his or her room.
  • Encourage teachers to speak candidly with speech students. The students are in the classroom more than the therapy room. They will progress further when they are supported and encouraged to use speech-language skills and techniques in all environments.

The teacher can:

  • Ask for an opportunity to view a therapy session in person or via a recording. Note hand signals and specific wording the therapist employs. Carefully listen for the correct speech sound productions. Witnessing some of the successful techniques will help when targeting these same needs in the classroom.
  • Support the SLP’s work in the classroom. Students will be motivated to use good speech and language skills when they are aware of shared expectations between the teacher and the SLP.

When the team is gathered for an IEP meeting.

The SLP can:

  • Provide teachers with a short list of items to think about prior to the meeting.
  • Encourage teachers to list areas of observed improvement or areas of need, and reference this list during the meeting.

The teacher can:

  • Speak out about concerns. Some classroom teachers seem to feel they do not know enough about speech-language treatment to comment on progress during IEP meetings. Teacher input contains vital information. Students do not always present speech-language issues in small-group settings.
  • Share in the ownership of the student’s speech/language success. The teacher is an integral part of the IEP team.

When students miss curriculum content because of pull-out services.

The SLP can:

  • Involve teachers as much as possible when creating a speech schedule. A little flexibility here can go a very long way. Be willing to adjust the schedule as needed. For example, push into the classroom for speech one week instead of pulling out, if appropriate.
  • Provide a full (HIPPA-compliant) schedule to teachers highlighting openings for make-up sessions. Keep this schedule updated as the year progresses. You can access a copy of what I use here.

The teacher can:

  • Ask the SLP if having access to lesson plans might be beneficial. Make the lesson plans available to the SLP in advance of the speech sessions.
  • Send classroom materials to be used in treatment sessions. Have a new unit in science? Send vocabulary words with your student to speech. Need help with an oral presentation for English? Send the rough draft to speech. Having trouble with basic concepts or following directions in math class? Let the SLP know. All of these things can be worked into a speech session.

Teachers and SLPs serve the needs of students in different ways, but we are all working on expanding children’s knowledge and skills. When we are cognizant of our colleagues’ needs and comfortable in our roles on the team, collaboration will be the start of something amazing: tremendous student progress.

 

Ashley G. Bonkofsky, MS, CCC-SLP, is a private-practice and school-based SLP in Utah, where her husband is stationed with the U.S. Air Force. She enjoys creating materials for teachers and SLPs and is the author of the blog Sweet Speech (sweetspeech.org). She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Groups 1, Language Learning and Education; and 16, School-Based Issues.

Comments

  1. Great post! I completely agree we are a team1

  2. Louisiana Depart of Ed started the “Salsa” initiative that follows this plan years ago. It has been a success, along with the supplemental 3:1 therapy approach model and SLPs utilizing the language in common core as speech targeted objectives.