In Appreciation: Jeri Logemann

In Appreciation II

Jerilyn (Jeri) Logemann, ASHA 1994 and 2000 president and a world-renowned researcher in speech-language pathology, died at age 72 on June 19, 2014, in her home surrounded by friends.
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After obtaining her bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees from Northwestern University, Logemann joined the faculty and became one of the most influential leaders in her field. A prolific scholar, she contributed groundbreaking books, journal articles, workshops, conference presentations and seminars on the management of voice disorders, normal swallowing physiology, and the assessment and treatment of speech and swallowing in patients with head and neck cancer and those with neurological impairments.

Logemann was the Ralph and Jean Sundin professor of communication sciences and disorders at Northwestern University, and professor of otolaryngology and neurology at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, where she directed the Voice, Speech and Language Service and Swallowing Center.

A pioneer in the development of techniques for effective assessment and treatment of speech and swallowing disorders, she—with Hilda Fisher—developed the Fisher-Logemann Test of Articulation Competence, and she developed the modified barium swallow test. Regarded as the leading authority in swallowing disorders, her research was continuously funded by the National Institutes of Health and other agencies for more than 30 years. Always concerned with improving speech-language pathology clinical service, Logemann formed the Clinical Sciences and Disorders Clinical Trials Research Group in 1995 to assist in the design and conduct of large-scale treatment studies of speech, language, learning, voice, swallowing, hearing and balance disorders.

Logemann was a Fellow of ASHA and the Chicago Medical Society, and received ASHA Honors, the association’s highest award. She served the university as chair of the department, and twice as chair of the Northwestern University Faculty.

Logemann’s relentless passion and commitment to her work; skilled leadership; inventive, indomitable and optimistic spirit despite relentless physical challenges; and her loyalty and generosity will be sorely missed by her patients, students, friends and colleagues.

She is survived by her cousin, Ruth Fruland, of Sheridan, Ill.

Gifts in her memory can be made to the Communication Sciences and Disorders Clinical Trials Research Group:

David Lilienfeld, Treasurer
CSDRG
13412 Pantera Road
San Diego, CA 92130-1022

Checks should be made payable to CSDRG. Should you wish to receive a tax deductible receipt, please indicate your return address.

Tanya M. Gallagher, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Speech and Hearing Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

“In Appreciation” is an occasional ASHASphere feature highlighting the lives and accomplishments of leaders in communication sciences and disorders.

In Appreciation: Glenda J. Ochsner

In Appreciation II

Glenda J. Ochsner, 2003 ASHA president, died May 29, 2014, at age 72.

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An Oklahoma native, Glenda earned her bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees at the University of Oklahoma. A speech-language pathologist, she started her long career in academics at the University of North Texas (Denton) in 1968.

Glenda returned to Oklahoma in 1969 to accept a position in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the John W. Keys Speech and Hearing Center at the University of Oklahoma Health Science Center, where she taught for the next 25 years and served asdepartment chair from 1987 to 1994. She then served as dean of health, social sciences and human behavior at Oklahoma City Community College (1994–1998). She began teaching in the Honors College in 1996 and the College of Liberal Studies in 2001 at the University of Oklahoma Norman Campus, and continued to serve both programs until her death.

Glenda received numerous teaching awards, including the prestigious David Ross Boyd Professorship, given to recognize teaching excellence at the University of Oklahoma. Her classes were widely sought by students on both the Norman and Health Sciences Center campuses.

Her teaching skills were not limited to the formal classroom. She served for more than a decade as coordinator of interdisciplinary diagnostic and treatment planning teams dealing with orofacial anomalies and language development on the Health Sciences Center campus, which have served as models for similar teams.

Despite demanding teaching and clinical service commitments, Glenda was active in research and in the training of student researchers. During her tenure at the university, she directed doctoral dissertations, numerous master’s theses and senior papers, and served on many planning and examining committees. In addition, she has mentored doctoral students who have participated with her in ongoing research projects, many of which have been grant-supported.

A consummate professional, Glenda served on major committees and boards relating to training and provision of services to people with communication disorders at both the federal and state levels. She was a leader in the profession, serving as president of the Oklahoma Speech-Language-Hearing Association and as president of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in 2003. Her dedication to high standards is shown in her service as chair of the Oklahoma Board of Examiners for Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology.

Glenda’s ability to attract federal and private support for the department programs in communication sciences and disorders contributed materially to their rise in national standing, enabling the university to compete with other programs for high-quality students and provide access to emerging technology.

Throughout her long career, Glenda had a strong commitment to quality patient care. She gave her support to the first licensing law in speech-language pathology and audiology in Oklahoma. She was appointed to chair that board and was regarded as highly effective in her term. Glenda Ochsner’s expertise and dedication is a testament to the high quality of leadership she gave to the profession.

Glenda also was a strong supporter of the arts, so much so that she earned a second master’s degree in 2005 in theatre and museum management to become better equipped to serve her community. She expended much time and energy working with and providing financial backing to various fine arts and performing arts groups in Yukon, Okla.

Survivors include her mother, Mary Jane Ochsner; life partner, James G. Schmaelzle of Yukon, Okla.; adopted son, Ryan B. Tigner of Yukon, Okla.; cousins; and a host of colleagues and friends.

James G. Schmaelzle, MCD, CCC-A is an audiologist in Yukon, Okla.

jims@flash.net

 

“In Appreciation” is an occasional ASHASphere feature highlighting the lives and accomplishments of leaders in communication sciences and disorders.

Robot Turtles: A Fun Way to Target Social Communication and Coding Skills

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If you are looking for a fun way to target social communication skills, as well as beginning computer programming, Robot Turtles is a great new board game you can play with your students (with or without autism). Robot Turtles requires players to use simple commands to move their turtles to capture a jewel on the game board. When students give commands, they are replicating the process computer programmers use to give instructions for a computer to execute. Games, in general, provide opportunities for social communication; Robot Turtles in particular involves specific interactions between the game players that enable more opportunities for social communication. For students who show an interest in games and computers, playing Robot Turtles can be a highly engaging way to practice social communication. Check out this video.

During game play, it is easy to provide students with opportunities to practice five different social communication skills:

1) Perspective taking: As turtle masters, students take the perspective of their turtles on the game board in order to decide which way to move. If they were to take their own perspectives, players may not move in the intended direction; success in the game depends on the ability to make decisions based on a different perspective.
2) Turn taking: Students also actively take turns throughout the game. Not only do they have to wait for the other turtle masters to complete their turns, but students do not actually move their own game pieces. The adult overseeing the game, otherwise known as the turtle mover, is in charge of executing the moves on the game board based on student commands.
3) Eye contact and body language: Since turtle masters don’t move their own pieces, they must clearly communicate their commands to the turtle mover. This offers a good opportunity to practice politely giving directions, as well as utilizing eye contact and body language to effectively communicate and acknowledge the turtle mover.
4) Following directions: In return, the turtle mover may communicate directions for the turtle masters to follow. The turtle mover also ensure players are aware of and adhere to the rules of the game.
5) Making comments: Throughout game play, students can be encouraged to make positive comments directed specifically to other turtle masters. For example, a student could say, “Nice move. I like how you did that!” when another player makes a good move in the game. In Robot Turtles, the goal is not to have one winner; all students keep playing until they achieve the goal for that specific level. Establishing a positive atmosphere where everyone is encouraged to be successful creates a great opportunity for modeling and practicing comments.

Robot Turtles can be played with children as young as four, all the way up to middle or high school. The game has several levels so it is easy to adapt game play based on student age and experience with the game. The upper levels of the game require sophisticated logic and analytical skills to complete the challenges, while the simple levels introduce children to basic logic. Either way, social communication skills can be targeted in various ways throughout the game.

Eric Sailers, MA, CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist with eight years of experience who currently works with high school students. He has an assistive technology certificate and a mobile programming certificate specializing in iOS. When he is not providing speech-language services in schools, he is creating iOS apps and delivering presentations.

7 Clues in the Medical Record to Discover Dysphagia

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Medical speech pathology has its uncertainties.This may cause the speech-language pathologist to be very conservative, possibly over-treating or overcompensating, per James Coyle, PhD, CCC-SLP, BCS-S at his talk on April 11, 2014, at the ASHA Healthcare & Business Institute.

“When the cause of dysphagia is not obvious: Sorting through treasure and surprises in the medical record.”

Coyle advised clinicians to value the medical record just as much as our direct examination of the patient. The “medical record is a messy place,” per Coyle. It is our job to dig for clues to distinguish which came first: the illness or the dysphagia. Some conditions can mimic dysphagia-related aspiration pneumonia. Some community acquired infections can create weakness and delirium, which then cause an acute dysphagia.

Let’s start with a story: An active-independent elderly female develops a urinary tract infection (UTI). She feels sleepy and stops eating/drinking regularly. This worsens the UTI and causes dehydration. She gets to the hospital four days after the onset of symptoms. Dehydration causes electrolyte imbalances, leading to delirium. Delirium + infection = more lethargy and a global cognitive decline. Being out of her usual environment causes more confusion and agitation. Antipsychotic medications are used to control the acute agitation. The patient becomes septic, as the infectious process spreads. Her urosepsis spreads to a pneumonia. The SLP notes a high aspiration risk, as the patient looks severely impaired. Unfortunately, without a thorough medical record review, the patient is labeled with dysphagia-related aspiration pneumonia. She stays on thickened liquids and pureed foods until hospital discharge. Will the patient fall through the cracks and never eat regular food again? Will the “Big-A-word” (ASPIRATION) follow her the rest of her life? Or will an SLP re-evaluate her in two weeks and discover that her dysphagia has disappeared?

I have summarized Coyle’s talk into these seven clues (more details and references in my full post).

1)    Is it pneumonia?

  • New infiltrate on CXR. Dependent lobes? Not necessarily only the lower lobes if the patient is bedridden or aspirating while laying down on the couch.
  • Leukocytosis (WBC count of >11.5-12.0). Warning: immune-compromised patients cannot make white blood cells.
  • Fever (>38 Celsius for >24 hours)

 

2)    What type of pneumonia is it?

  • Ventilator Acquired Pneumonia (VAP): May be widespread infiltrates. Strong correlation with oral pathogens.
  • Dysphagia-Related Aspiration Pneumonia (DAP): A recurrent pneumonia may be one big infection from ongoing aspiration. Perform a swallow study to determine if dysphagia is present and why. This is so important. If we label them with DAP, that patient’s past medical history will forever say “Aspiration Pneumonia.” Then medical personnel may be overly conservative in the future.
  • Non-Dysphagia-Related Aspiration Pneumonia (NDAP) and/or Aspiration Pneumonitis: if no dysphagia present before infection, check history for chemical irritants, allergens, reflux, a vomiting event, or use of acid-suppression therapy (i.e., Proton-Pump Inhibitors).
  • Hospital Acquired Pneumonia (HAP) or Health Care Acquired Pneumonia (HCAP): pathogens from the institution getting into the lung. Aspiration?
  • Community Acquired Pneumonia (CAP): may be diffuse infiltrates and not in dependent lobes.

 

3)    What was the patient’s baseline? “You got to have dysphagia to have dysphagia,” joked Coyle. “But seriously,” he added, “I can’t underscore this enough.” Dysphagia-Related Aspiration Pneumonia (DAP) requires the finding of difficulty swallowing prior to getting sick. Be a detective.

 

4)    Is there a systemic spread of infection (e.g., septicemia or sepsis)?

  • Sources: The lung is not the sole source for the primary infection. Wound, oral cavity, urinary tract?
  • Problem: The patient may not develop sudden signs, but it can unfold rapidly. Coyle urged SLPs to be careful when predicting goals for the future, as “sick people look pretty darn sick.” Good communication is needed at discharge to ensure re-evaluations.
  • Ask the medical team questions: Is this a short-term reversible problem? Could this be an acute dysphagia due to the illness?

 

5)    Was there a surgical procedure that could have caused the dysphagia? For examples: cardiothoracic surgery, lung transplant, lung resection, esophagectomy, head/neck cancer resection. Coyle recommended Atkins, et al (2007). See references on my full post.

 

6)    Was there a medical procedure that could have caused the dysphagia or an aspiration? For examples: feeding tubes, prolonged intubation, traumatic intubation, peri-operative aspiration event, chemotherapy/radiation.

 

7)    Are there medications that could be causing the aspiration, dysphagia, or pneumonia?

  • Polypharmacy increases a patient’s pneumonia risk.
  • Coyle recommended reading Knol, et al (2008). This was a case controlled study of elderly patients with age-matched controls. Patients who received antipsychotics where 60% more likely to have pneumonia.
  • Read more possibilities on my full post.

 

Our answers to these questions have a great impact on all we do: from our initial examination and instrumental evaluations through our discharge plan and beyond. SLPs do not diagnose pneumonia, but our communication with the medical team is an extremely valuable contribution to their differential diagnosis.

 

Karen Sheffler, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1995 with her master’s degree. There, she was under the influence of the great mentors in the field of dysphagia like Dr. John (Jay) Rosenbek, Dr. JoAnne Robbins, and Dr. James L. Coyle. Once the “dysphagia bug” bit, she has never looked back. Karen has always enjoyed medical speech pathology, working in skilled nursing facilities and rehabilitation centers in the 1990s, and now in acute care in the Boston area for more than 14 years. She has trained graduate student clinicians during their acute care internships for more than 10 years. Special interests include neurological conditions, esophageal dysphagia, geriatrics, end-of-life considerations, and patient safety/risk management. She has lectured on various topics in dysphagia in the hospital setting, to dental students at the Tufts University Dental School, and on Lateral Medullary Syndrome at the 2011 ASHA convention. She is a member of the Dysphagia Research Society and the Special Interest Group 13: Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders. Karen obtained her BCS-S (Board Certified Specialist in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders) in August of 2012. You can follow her blog, www.swallowstudy.com.

 

Learning to Hear: Finally, the Technology

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Hearing aids have improved by leaps and bounds over the past decade. The advanced signal processing and wireless connectivity options absolutely boggle the mind. As an audiologist, I’m constantly amazed at what today’s hearing aids are capable of doing for patients. I’m equally amazed at what my patients expect the hearing aids to be capable of doing for them; yet can we blame them? They are bombarded by newspaper advertisements and mailers boasting the incredible benefits of modern hearing aids. They don’t understand what all is (or should be) included in bundled pricing, so they figure that a $X,000 pair of hearing aids should fix their hearing problems and more. I believe these inflated expectations, coupled with a lack of comprehensive patient education during the rehabilitative process, explain why patient satisfaction and market penetration are not increasing at the same rate as the technological advancements in amplification.

So how do we address these issues? The answer always goes back to the root of our profession. As audiologic rehabilitation specialists, our job is to equip our patients with tools and strategies necessary to function successfully in the world, despite their hearing loss. Patients must understand that hearing aids are only one piece of the puzzle when it comes to successful communication. In fact, there are five essential keys to communication success:

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In previous blogs we’ve discussed listener strategies, speaker strategies, and environmental modifications as critical parts of the communication puzzle. During the aural rehabilitation process, I deliberately present those pieces before I discuss technology options. Listener strategies empower the patient to take responsibility for their hearing loss. Speaker strategies engage the communication partners to be involved. Environmental modifications make the patient and their communication partners aware of their surroundings and empower them to actively create the best possible listening situations.

When we’re finally ready to present technology options, there are two important points to keep in mind. First, we need to be sure we are presenting options. I don’t mean options in terms of different hearing aid manufacturers. I mean options in terms of ALL the technology options appropriate for the patient, based on his or her specific listening challenges. I present the options as a continuum, with inexpensive assistive listening devices and personal sound amplifiers on one end, and high end hearing aids with wireless accessories on the other end. Obviously there are many technological options in between. Second, it is critical that the technology options are presented in conjunction with the other strategies discussed. Patients must understand that technology must be combined with speaker and listener strategies and environmental modifications. The speaker, listener, environment, and technology keys are equally important when it comes to ensuring a successful communication exchange.

The fifth key to communication success is practice. Patients can learn all the communication strategies in the world, but they won’t help a bit if they don’t actually use them. The same goes for technology. Patients can buy the most advanced digital hearing aids available, but they are just a waste of money if they refuse to wear them in all of their challenging listening situations. As rehabilitation specialists, we are responsible for motivating our patients to practice and use all that they’ve learned. We must find ways to hold them accountable and create a follow-up plan that ensures long-term success.

Patients with hearing loss have many options when it comes to pursuing technology. As audiologists, it is our responsibility to make them see the “big picture” and implement a comprehensive plan that addresses all pieces of the communication puzzle. I truly believe that patient satisfaction and market penetration rates will only increase when we return to our roots and make patient education the focus of our rehabilitation efforts.

 

Dr. Dusty Ann Jessen, AuDis a practicing audiologist in a busy ENT clinic in Littleton, Colo. She is the founder of Cut to the Chase Communication, LLC, a company dedicated to providing “fun, easy, and effective” counseling tools for busy hearing care professionals. She is also the author of Frustrated by Hearing Loss? 5 Keys to Communication Success. Dr. Jessen can be contacted at info@CutToTheChaseCommunication.com.

 

June is Aphasia Awareness Month—Join the Celebration!

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June is National Aphasia Awareness Month and this year’s host group is the Big Sky Aphasia Program in Missoula, Mont.. This year’s theme is “ It’s Never Too Late To Communicate” and the National Aphasia Association (NAA) is encouraging professionals, consumers, community support groups and aphasia centers nationwide to raise public awareness about aphasia in June and has a poster and resource packet available.

Thanks to Senator Tim Johnson (D-S.D.) and Senator Mark Kirk (R-Ill.) for, once again, co-sponsoring the resolution to proclaim June as National Aphasia Awareness Month! You can find the resolution here.

This year we launched a month-long social media contest to help the public understand aphasia and how to communicate with people who have aphasia. We are proud to introduce our new social media intern, Laura Cobb, whose first assignment is serving as spokesperson for the Aphasia Awareness Month contest. Laura is 27 years old and lives in St, Louis, Mo.. In September 2008 she was a student at Washington University majoring in psychology and hoping to work in the field of autism when her car was struck by a drunk driver as she returned home from studying. Laura suffered a stroke resulting in aphasia along with other injuries including a partial hearing loss for which she wears bilateral hearing aids.With intensive speech services, Laura has been able to regain a good portion of her ability to communicate. She continues to receive speech and language treatment and continues to improve. We first met Laura when she created her own video for You Tube on “How to Talk to Someone with Aphasia.” Her video has received more than 200,000 views to date and she was interviewed for an article in the Huffington Post.

“I’m excited to work with the NAA now,” says Laura in the first of her weekly video clips discussing the NAA’s contest, which encourages people to post about aphasia on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and YouTube using the hashtag #AphasiaAwarenessMonth.  Each week, participants are tasked with a different challenge. For example, in week one, people were asked to answer the question “What is aphasia?” In week two, participants shared their tips for communicating with people with aphasia and in week three they posted pictures of themselves with the June poster. Click here to learn about this week’s challenge.

“It’s never too late to communicate. So, we want your tips. My favorite tip: speak s-l-o-w-l-y,” says Laura. At the end of each week, a winner will be selected randomly and awarded a series of aphasia-related prizes; then a new weekly challenge will be announced. At the end of the five-week contest, the top prize, an iPad Mini, will be awarded on June 27. There is no cost to participate. The more people post using #AphasiaAwarenessMonth, the more chances they have to win and the more we can raise awareness of aphasia!

But that’s not all you can do. Here are some other suggestions as to how you can celebrate National Aphasia Awareness Month in June:

  • Provide training at local hospitals, clinics, senior citizens centers, nursing homes, etc.
  • Send packets of information to doctors and other professionals and staff who work with aphasia (e.g. physical therapists, occupational therapists, social workers, nurses). Training for these groups would be very helpful in dealing with the communication difficulties.
  • Provide training workshops and support groups for family and caregivers.
  • Provide workshops for local religious groups – many of these have existing programs for helping people in the community.
  • Display posters and disseminate materials in local shopping centers, libraries and supermarkets about aphasia.
  • Set up an information table to educate employees, patients and families about aphasia.
  • Get your city/town to pass a resolution proclaiming June as National Aphasia Awareness Month- we can provide you with the template.

Remember, aphasia advocacy and increasing awareness is a year round activity so join the effort! For more information or to receive your Aphasia Awareness Month packet, contact the NAA’s Response Center at 800-922-4622 or visit the NAA website.

 

Ellayne S. Ganzfried, M.S., CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist and the Executive Director of the National Aphasia Association. She is Past President of the NYS Speech Language Hearing Association (NYSSLHA), Long Island Speech Language Hearing Association (LISHA) and the Council of State Association Presidents for Speech Language Pathology and Audiology (CSAP) and remains active in these associations. Ellayne is a Fellow of the American Speech Language Hearing Association (ASHA). She was a site visitor for ASHA’s Council on Academic Accreditation (CAA) and a practitioner member of the CAA for four years. She is currently on ASHA’s Committee on Honors. Ellayne has created and managed several speech, hearing and rehabilitation programs in New York and Massachusetts. She is an adjunct instructor at Adelphi University-Garden City –NY. Ellayne has written articles and presented regionally and nationally on a variety of topics including aphasia, rehabilitation and leadership skills.

Preventing Food Jags: What’s a Parent to Do?

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As a pediatric feeding therapist, many kids are on my caseload because they are stuck in the chicken nugget and french fry rut…or will only eat one brand of mac-n-cheese…or appear addicted to the not-so-happy hamburger meal at a popular fast food chain. While this may often include kids with special needs such as autism, more than half my caseload consists of the traditional “picky-eaters” who spiraled down to only eating a few types of foods and now have a feeding disorder.  I  even had one child who only ate eight different crunchy vegetables, like broccoli and carrots.  Given his love for vegetables, it took his parents a long time to decide this might be a problem. The point is: These kids are stuck in food jag, eating a very limited number of foods and strongly refusing all others.  It creates havoc not only from a nutritional standpoint, but from a social aspect too. Once their parents realize the kids are stuck, the parents feel trapped as well. It’s incredibly stressful for the entire family, especially when mealtimes occur three times per day and there are only a few options on what their child will eat.

It’s impossible in a short blog post to describe how to proceed in feeding therapy once a child is deep in a food jag.  Each child is unique, as is each family. But, in general,  I can offer some tips on how to prevent this from happening in many families, again, keeping in mind that each child and each family is truly unique.

Here are my Top Ten suggestions for preventing food jags:

#10: Start Early.  Expose baby to as many flavors and safe foods as possible.   The recent post for ASHA on Baby Led Weaning: A Developmental Perspective may offer insight into that process.

#9: Rotate, Rotate, Rotate: Foods, that is.  Jot down what baby was offered and rotate foods frequently, so that new flavors reappear, regardless if your child liked (or didn’t like) them on the first few encounters.  This is true for kids of all ages.  It’s about building familiarity.  Think about the infamous green bean casserole at Thanksgiving.  It’s rare that hesitant eaters will try it, because they often see it only once or twice per year.

#8: Food Left on the Plate is NOT Wasted: Even if it ends up in the compost, the purpose of the food’s presence on a child’s plate is for him to see it, smell it, touch it, hear it crunch under his fork and  perhaps, taste it.  So if the best he can do is pick it up and chat with you about the properties of green beans, then hurray!  That’s never a waste, because he’s learning about a new food.

#7: Offer Small Portions:  Present small samples.  Underwhelming – that’s  exactly the feeling we hope to invoke.   Besides, if a tiny sample sparks some interest and your child asks for more peas, well, that’s just music to your ears, right?  Present the foods in little ramekins, small ice cube trays or even on  tiny tasting spoons used for samples at the ice cream shop.

#6: Highlight Three or Four Ingredients Over Two Weeks:  You can expose kids to the same three or four ingredients over the course of two weeks, while making many different recipes.  For example, here are nine different ways to use basil, tomatoes and garlic.  Remember get the kids involved in the recipe, so they experience the food with all of their senses.  Even toddlers can tear basil and release the fragrance, sprinkling it on cheese pizza to add a little green.   If they just want to include it as a garnish on the plate beside the pizza, that’s a good start, too!

#5 Focus on Building Relationships with FoodThat often doesn’t begin with chewing and swallowing.  Garden, grocery stop, visit the farmer’s market, create food science experiments like this fancy way of separating egg whites from the yoke.  Sounds corny (pardon the pun!), but making friends with food means getting to know food.  I often tell the kids I work with “We are introducing your brain to broccoli.  Brain, say hello to broccoli!”

#4 Don’t Wait for a Picky Eating Phase to Pass: Use these strategies now.  Keep them up, even through a phase of resistant eating.  Learning to be an adventurous eater takes time.

#3 Don’t Food Jag on FAMILY favorites.  In our fast paced life, it’s easy to grab the same thing for dinner most evenings.  Because of certain preferences, are the same few foods served too often?  Ask yourself, are you funneling down to your list of “sure things?”  It’s easy to fall into the trap: “Let’s just have pizza again – at least I know everyone will eat that.”

#2 Make Family Dinnertime Less about Dinner and More about Family.  Why?  Because the more a family focuses on the time together, sharing tidbits of their day and enjoying each other’s company,  the sweeter the atmosphere at the table.  Seems ironic, given this article is focused is on food, but, the strategies noted above all include time together.  That’s what family mealtimes are meant to be: a time to share our day.  Becoming an adventurous eater is part of that process over time.

And the #1 strategy for preventing food jags?  Seek help early.  If mealtimes become stressful or the strategies above seem especially challenging, that’s the time to ask a feeding therapist for help.  Feeding therapy is more than just the immediate assessment and treatment of feeding disorders – the long term goal is creating joyful mealtimes for the whole family.  The sooner you seek advice, the closer you are to that goal.   I hope you’ll visit me at My Munch Bug.com for articles and advice on raising adventurous eaters and solving picky eating issues.  Plus, here are just a few of my favorite resources:

Websites & Blogs

Doctor Yum.com

Spectrum Speech and Feeding.com

Picky Tots BlogSpot

Books

Getting to Yum

Fearless Feeding

Nobody Ever Told Me (or My Mother) THAT!

Facebook

Food Smart Kids

Feeding Matters

Feeding Tube Awareness

 

Melanie Potock, MA, CCC-SLP, treats children birth to teens who have difficulty eating.  She is the author of Happy Mealtimes with Happy Kids and the producer of the award-winning kids’ CD Dancing in the Kitchen: Songs that Celebrate the Joy of Food!  Melanie’s two-day course on pediatric feeding is  offered for ASHA CEUs and includes both her book and CD for each attendee.  She can be reached at Melanie@mymunchbug.com.

Groovin’ Your Way to Social Skills Practice

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I wanted to create a motivating activity for a small social skills group of two adults with developmental disabilities. I suspected that my small therapy group needed a change of pace to increase motivation and spark some conversation and engagement in each other’s interests. Both of my clients love music, so I thought Pandora, the music app was a natural solution. It’s free, easily accessible with my phone and easy to use.

One of my clients loves blues and jazz and my other client loves R & B and hip hop. We gathered a list of favorite artists and created a bingo board with various artists’ pictures using Boardmaker. If you do not have Boardmaker, you can create a board using Connect Ability. We reviewed each artist by discussing who they were and what type of music they played. My bingo board was originally set up with 12 artists (each box included the artist’s picture and name). I then created a station for each artist on the bingo board. I began the game by choosing one of the artists on their bingo board and playing a song. My clients had to guess who the artist was. Whoever filled their board up first won the game. As my clients improved and became increasingly motivated, I created new boards with all different types of artists and music genres that were both familiar and unfamiliar to them.

My clients loved the game and were extremely motivated, which is what lead me to writing this article. One of my clients who rarely engages in conversation and interaction, stood up and began singing! I also started using the game with other groups and clients who were equally motivated. As a side note, be aware of any lyrics that may be inappropriate in a therapy session. I was careful in choosing particular songs from artists that I thought might have inappropriate or foul language.

Another thing that I love about Pandora is that you can view the lyrics and genres, which is extremely helpful for several reasons listed below. Here are some speech and language goals to work on with the app, Pandora:

1. Social skills: My clients naturally started appropriate conversations about the particular artists. The music served as an excellent conversational starter. For example, when listening to Frank Sinatra my client asked his peer, “Do you like Frank Sinatra?” Each client learned something new about a different artist which helped expand their vocabulary.
2. Visual and auditory recalling of information: My clients had practice with recalling the names of particular artists. They also improved their ability to recall information upon hearing a particular song.
3. Abstract Language: After we listened to each song, we discussed the lyrics. I read the lyrics and we defined and reviewed some terminology that was more abstract, such as “break my heart”, “my life is like a storm”, etc.
4. Literacy: For a teen or adult working on literacy, printing out the lyrics of a favorite song can be extremely motivating. This can also lead to work on improving literacy and reading comprehension. Learning the artist’s names can be another literacy activity. The key to learning is motivation. If music is motivating, learning the artist’s name can be a wonderful and engaging activity.
5. Emotions: Discuss the melody of the song and if it is a sad or happy song. Ask them “wh” questions, give choices, etc. Discuss how the song makes them feel. Music is such a powerful tool to discuss emotions because it can bring up memories and evokes emotions that you wouldn’t otherwise discuss in a therapy session.
6. Answering “wh” questions. Ask your clients, “What is the song about?” etc. This music activity can be an ideal opportunity to ask and answer questions and work on comprehension. Discuss the similarities and differences between the artists. This can lead to another goal of describing (e.g. “the song is loud and fast,” “the song is slow and soft,” etc)
7. Expanding vocabulary: With the lyrics in hand, it is easy to work on expanding vocabulary. Discuss and define new words within the lyrics. Write the words down and review them for the next session. Create sentences with the new words to improve carryover.
8. Phonemic awareness: Many songs naturally rhyme. Using the lyrics for a phonemic awareness activity can be motivating and engaging.
9. Categorization: Print out a list of different types of music. Explain and define the difference between pop, rock and roll, jazz, etc. This can lead to categorization when discussing specific artists. Here is a list of genres. Another way to play the game is to play a song from a certain genre and have your client guess what genre. You can set up your board with 12 different music genres.
10. Turn taking: With a bingo game, turn taking will occur naturally. Turn taking as a goal can also be targeted during conversation.

I hope you find these helpful! I’d love to hear any suggestions you all may have so please comment below!

 

Rebecca Eisenberg, MS, CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist, author, instructor, and parent of two young children, who began her website www.gravitybread.com to create a resource for parents to help make mealtime an enriched learning experience . She discusses the benefits of reading to young children during mealtime, shares recipes with language tips and carryover activities, reviews children’s books for typical children and those with special needs as well as educational apps. She has worked for many years with both children and adults with developmental disabilities in a variety of settings including schools, day habilitation programs, home care and clinics. She can be reached at becca@gravitybread.com, or you can follow her on Facebook; on Twitter; or on Pinterest.

Become a (Hearing) Environmentalist

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Communication is a complex puzzle that requires all pieces to be properly placed. It is critical for audiologists to address all pieces of that puzzle during the aural rehabilitation process to ensure a successful outcome for the patient. A comprehensive counseling protocol should thoroughly address the following five keys to communication success:

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My previous blogs focused on the roles of the speaker and the listener in a communication exchange. Today we’ll address the third key to communication success: environment. No, I’m not talking about the trees and the birds! When it comes to communication, environmental modifications often have the biggest impact, yet they are often overlooked. Let’s take a look at one of the most difficult listening situations for people with hearing loss, and how environmental modifications can reduce potential communication challenges.

The hastily-educated patient:

Mr. Jones and his wife are looking forward to dinner at their favorite restaurant to celebrate their anniversary. After a busy day, they rush out of the house at 5:30 p.m., hoping they won’t have to wait too long for a table. They are both starving, so they accept the first-available table, which happens to be in the middle of the restaurant and close to the kitchen. Mr. Jones is still adapting to his new hearing aids and feels overwhelmed by all of the noise. They are surrounded by families with loud children, clanking dishes, and noises from the kitchen. He and his wife can hardly hear each other above all the noise and feel frustrated that they weren’t able to fully enjoy their anniversary dinner. They are both disappointed that his new hearing aids did not perform better in this situation.

The well-educated patient:

Mr. Jones and his wife are looking forward to dinner at their favorite restaurant to celebrate their anniversary. They make a 4:00pm reservation and request a corner booth with good lighting. When they arrive for dinner, they are pleased to find that they nearly have the restaurant to themselves. They are seated immediately, served quickly, and enjoy reminiscing about the past year over a pleasant early dinner. Mr. Jones is pleased that his new hearing aids made it easier to hear his wife’s voice.

It doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out which scenario will result in a more satisfied patient outcome. Determine which situations are most challenging for your patients, and help them to develop an “environmental modification” plan for those specific situations. These plans typically incorporate some version of the following two elements:

1. Reducing background noise
2. Improving visibility (ex. lighting, proximity, orientation)

It is our professional responsibility to make sure that every patient is educated and equipped with tools and strategies that address all pieces of the communication puzzle. They must understand that environmental modifications are just as important as the hearing aids. While thorough patient education may take a bit longer in the beginning, it almost always saves valuable clinic time in the end. The resulting patient success and satisfaction certainly make it time well-spent.

 

Dr. Dusty Ann Jessen, AuDis a practicing audiologist in a busy ENT clinic in Littleton, Colo. She is the founder of Cut to the Chase Communication, LLC, a company dedicated to providing “fun, easy, and effective” counseling tools for busy hearing care professionals. She is also the author of Frustrated by Hearing Loss? 5 Keys to Communication Success. Dr. Jessen can be contacted at info@CutToTheChaseCommunication.com.

 

 

 

What SLPs Need to Know About the Medical Side of Pediatric Feeding

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Pediatric feeding problems come in all shapes and sizes. They tend to be complicated and often result from a combination of factors. This can make effective treatment challenging for the feeding therapist. A feeding problem is defined as “The failure to progress with feeding skills. Developmentally, a feeding problem exists when a child is ‘stuck’ in their feeding pattern and cannot progress.”

So where should the speech-language pathologist start? We should always begin by trying to figure out why the child is stuck and not progressing with eating and oral motor skills. Whether the child is dependent on tube feedings, not moving to textured foods, grazing on snack foods throughout the day, failing to thrive, pocketing foods, or spitting foods out, using medical management strategies can greatly improve a child’s success in feeding therapy.

A significant number of children with feeding difficulty also have a history of gastrointestinal problems such as gastroesophageal reflux, constipation, poor appetite, poor weight gain, and sometimes food intolerance. These issues can cause eating to be painful for the child which can lead to food refusal and avoidance and subsequent oral motor delay due to decreased practice eating the needed volumes for growth and poor acceptance of age appropriate foods. Research has shown the relationship between feeding difficulty and gastroesophageal reflux.

Most of the children we work with can’t tell us what is wrong. Their eating behavior tells us a lot about their digestive tract. These children often graze, volume limit, or avoid food because filling up their stomachs hurts. Some children complain that they have stomach pain while others vomit, spit up or cry with eating. We know that if these problems persist for any length of time, they become learned patterns of behavior.

Medical strategies that promote “gut” comfort and encourage appetite will help the child be receptive to eating and can improve response to feeding therapy. These strategies typically involve the following:

 

  • Addressing weight gain and growth as the priority of a feeding program.
  • Treating constipation and establishing a routine of daily soft stooling.
  • Treating gastroesophageal reflux and hypersensitivity in the GI tract.
  • Using hydrolyzed formulas that are easier to digest and promote gastric emptying and stooling.
  • Adjusting tube feeding rates and schedules to promote comfort.
  • Using appetite stimulants to boost hunger.

Some children’s feeding skills improve dramatically with medical management alone. Other children will need feeding therapy using techniques to improve acceptance of volume and variety of foods as well as oral motor therapy to progress to age appropriate oral motor patterns. No matter what type of feeding therapy approach you are using, the child will respond better if they feel better.

Many therapists have been taught to start with the mouth. That means addressing the oral motor hypersensitivity or oral motor delay first. Many clinicians feel that the doctor or medical specialists are addressing the reflux and constipation issues. However, it really is a team effort. Most physicians do not watch the child eat or see a child as often as we do as therapists. Therefore, it is important to work closely with the referring physicians to assist with proper diagnosis and treatment in order to assure the best outcomes for our patients.

Depending on the child, using medical management strategies can take multiple visits over time with the physician. If the child’s symptoms persist despite using medicines for reflux and constipation, a pediatrician may decide to refer the child to a gastroenterologist or feeding team for specialized care. A child also may undergo further testing to rule out medical diagnoses that can negatively effect eating such as anemia, food allergy, eosinophillic esophagitis, malrotation, and motility disorders.

The most important reason to recognize and treat the underlying medical issues of children with pediatric feeding problems is to help them progress. As SLPs, we need to recognize and identify GI issues prior to starting therapy so that we are not reinforcing pain or discomfort for the child. Our goals for most clients involve weight gain and growth, age appropriate oral motor patterns, and acceptance of a variety of foods from all food groups for healthy eating. These are attainable goals for many of our clients. Using medical strategies to help the child feel better will improve response to feeding therapy and eventually outcomes.

Krisi Brackett MS, CCC-SLP, is a feeding specialist with over 20 years of experience working with children with feeding difficulties. Krisi is co-director of the pediatric feeding team at the NC Children’s Hospital, UNC Hospitals, Chapel Hill, N.CFollow her at www.pediatricfeedingnews.com. The blog is dedicated to up to date pediatric feeding information. Krisi teaches a two-day workshop on using a medical/motor/behavior approach, is an adjunct instructor teaching a pediatric dysphagia seminar at UNC-Chapel Hill, and has co-authored a chapter in Pediatric Feeding Disorders: Evaluation and Treatment, Therapro, 2013.