Common Core Suggestions from One Speechie to Another

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As classroom teachers change their teaching to base objectives around Common Core State Standards, we, as speech-language pathologists, must consider the standards as well. It affects us in our identification of language disorders, goal writing, and session objectives.
It is important to consider the CCSS when identifying students through the Response to Intervention (RTI) process. It is important to collaborate with classroom teachers to understand where the students are struggling and which standards they are unable to achieve. Regardless of the RTI tier or level of support the student in question is receiving, we must  determine strategies to help these students acquire these standards necessary for age and grade.
There are a variety of speech and language difficulties that can affect a student’s ability to acquire the CCSS. Some examples of these include:

  • If they cannot use or respond to questions, it will impact their ability to “Understand and use question words (interrogatives) (e.g., who, what, where, when, why, how).”
  • If they have weaknesses in vocabulary, it will impact their ability to “Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly.”
  • If they display difficulties comprehending grammatical concepts, it will impact their ability to “Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.”

You should consider what standards are expected for the grade of the student in question and where the student is functioning when developing goals.

So how can you incorporate CCSS philosophies during speech and language sessions? First get a handle on what students are expected to know and understand. This will assist with carryover of skills from the speech room into the classroom and beyond. Here are some ideas to consider:

  • You can have students go on scavenger hunts to help them learn to identify text features of nonfiction texts.
  • Have students practice using higher level thinking: predict, question, visualize, analyze, and make connections.
  • Model for students what to do/think before, during, and after reading by using thought bubbles on a Popsicle stick to help illustrate what one should think and say at each of those phases.
  • Use a KWL chart (know, want to know, learned) when teaching new vocabulary/concepts. Use carrier phrases to teach students how to express key story elements:
  1. “The main characters are…”
  2. “The important events are…”
  3. “The author is…”
  4. “One fact I learned is…”
  • Use thinking notes on Post-Its while reading a story to teach students to generate their own questions while reading.
  • Use a variety of genres when incorporating literacy activities (fables, short stories, poems, plays, biographies, articles, etc.).

For the most part, the CCSS correlate with our typical speech and language goals and objectives. One difference is the expectations for students per grade. Another difference is the language students are expected to recognize, comprehend, and use in the classroom. If classroom teachers are expected to use the vocabulary in the classroom, it is important for our students to hear that same vocabulary in the speech room as well. For students with vocabulary weaknesses, they may need extra assistance in learning this vocabulary and terminology. Some important vocabulary words and concepts that we, as Speech-Language Pathologists should incorporate into our sessions and make sure our students understand include:

  • Evidence
  • Central idea
  • Point of view
  • Plot
  • Audience
  • Analyze
  • Dialogue
  • Theme

Whether you are identifying students that could benefit from speech and language services, developing goals, or creating treatment plans,you as an SLP working with school-aged students need to consider the CCSS. It will help advocate how a student will benefit from speech and language services as well as justify for those that are ready to graduate. It also will help make speech and language sessions more academically relevant and easier to promote generalization into the classroom.

“Miss Speechie” is a licensed speech-language pathologist working in a public elementary school in New York State. She is the author of the blog, Speech Time Fun. She enjoys creating and sharing materials, resources, ideas for speech-language pathologists. 

What Has ASHA Done for Us Audiologists Lately?

hearing aid shutterstockRecently, I was asked by a friend (another audiologist) why I belong to ASHA and what do they do for me? After all, they were the organization for speech-language pathology and really didn’t care about audiology except for the CCC-A, as believed by some. This led me to reflect on why I feel ASHA’s membership benefits me as an audiologist, focusing on the past few years.

Just in the last year, ASHA has provided me with a wealth of information related to reimbursement issues, which was developed in collaboration with the Academy of Doctors of Audiology, the Directors of Speech and Hearing Programs in State, Health and Welfare Agencies, Academy of Rehabilitative Audiology, the Educational Audiology Association, and the American Academy of Audiology.

For me, the guidance for audiologists on reviewing third party payer provider contracts was a very timely and helpful reminder because—at that time—my practice was being approached by a number of entities to provide hearing aid services.

Another helpful resource was the question and answer document about the new Otoacoustic CPT Codes that gave me information on how to bill these codes appropriately. There was also information on new requirements for the Physician Quality Reporting System, which helped me too. Aside from these useful and helpful resources, I appreciate that the information was developed jointly and shared within the audiology community.

When I think about advocacy being a member benefit, I’m thankful for quite a few things that ASHA’s advocacy team has pushed for, including:

  • A comprehensive audiology benefit. This will allow me to provide the necessary rehabilitative/habilitative services to the people I serve. This proposal will recognize that audiologists are the best providers of these services. As health care moves toward prevention of health problems and a new payment system, this will allow me to provide therapy services as part of a team!
  • Legislation related to early detection of hearing loss. The outcome of that work has benefited so many of the children and families we serve.
  • Legislation that averted the proposed 20 percent cut in Medicare payments. These have been scheduled to take place every year for the last several years, but keep getting extended. I can’t help but think that ASHA’s lobbyists have been instrumental in helping in that effort.

ASHA’s ongoing advocacy for the profession of audiology has benefited me in so many ways. Recently, ASHA was very helpful working out the “kinks” in the federal employee health benefits hearing aid plan. ASHA is also developing and implementing plans to help us navigate through the new accountable care organizations.  And, they are working diligently to see that we have a voice in the implementation of the Affordable Care Act.

As I continued to think of all of the benefits from ASHA membership—as an audiologist—I realized there has been great value in continuing to be a member of ASHA!  I want to thank my friend for asking me why I still belong.


Stuart Trembath, MA, CCC-A, is chair of ASHA’s Health Care Economics Committee and co-owner of Hearing Associates in Mason City, Iowa.

Best New Games for Speech Intervention

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I’m lucky to have enjoyed the unique opportunity to attend the International Toy Fair in New York City as a member of the press, viewing the exciting new products being introduced. After seeing hundreds of new games, toys and books, I shared my first impressions of what stood out, delivering language learning potential. Now that I have had a chance to catch my breath, the boxes are arriving with Ninja Turtle games and fuzzy chick puppets to review for my PAL Award (Play Advances Language). As speech language pathologists, we are a busy crew, spinning many plates at once–serving our clients, keeping data, attending meetings, planning therapy and keeping up with what’s new. Many of you have told me how much you appreciate my selection process and the products I recommend, saving you time, so here are my newest recommendations with descriptions on how I have found them to be helpful. As always, I love your comments on how YOU use them in new and creative ways too!

Animal Soup The Mixed-Up Animal Board Game! by The Haywire Group

Just setting up this game gets lots of giggles going as kids look at the pictured math showing the sum of a tiger plus a rhinoceros equals, of course, a “tigeroceros!” Preschoolers request that I read through each zany combination of animals before starting the game. Players make their way around the forest game board, which cleverly uses the box, as they land on different animals, collecting the corresponding picture card. Kids continually check the large reference chart of combined animals to see what they need to complete their “croctopus,” “birdle” or “squale”–(crocodile+octopus, bird+turtle, or squirrel+whale). Thankfully they have a “trade” option to land on so they can negotiate with a peer for the animal to complete their creature. Flip the two matching cards over, and you are rewarded with a hilarious animal soup combination. Two completed mixed-up animals wins the game. This game, based on the best selling book by Todd S. Doodler, can be used to further speech and language skills:

  • Articulation: repeat the goofy combined animal names, which I’ve found helpful in making preschoolers aware of moving their mouths and listening to include all the sounds in a word.
  • Practice negotiating skills as they realize cards needed for a trade and anticipate where their needed card is coming up on the board.
  • Follow directions.
  • Comparisons between the game and the book it is based on.

Suggested age: 3 and up. This is so popular with my preschoolers, they consistently request to play.

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Clash Alley Strategy Board Game by Wonder Forge

Start your social language lesson as kids set up the 3-D game board, stacking boxes at different levels for the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles to traverse through the maze-like warehouse. A collaborative effort, players help each other to customize the board. An excellent introduction to strategy games, Clash Alley has many options to enhance the turtle’s success as they run, climb and leap to race to complete their mission, uncovering the card to rescue April, retrieve the AI chip, grab the Mutagen or even pick up a pizza! Earning and playing action cards are the key to successful travel across the board as your turtle can team up to battle villains–Kraag, powerful mutants and even Shredder–to collect spy cards to peak under a mission disk, swipe card to steal from another player, or Team Up, which allows two turtles to combine attack points to overcome a villain. The directions take a little time to understand but once kids got them, they couldn’t get enough of this game. Speech and language goals to address:

  • Description: I use this multi-leveled game of strategy in my group with higher-level kids on the autism spectrum and their typical peer play partner. I have my client explain the directions (which have many options for beating the villains) which can be challenging. The visual prompts of action cards and triple option dice help.
  • Social language: Learning to take turns and a group attack option to join forces with another player.
  • Academic language: Language of math as kids help each other add up attack points and have to determine what number is greater or less than another to win the battle.
  • Pretend play: Kids surprised me as they got into the game because even though they were competing against each other, there was a feeling of camaraderie against the villains.

Suggested age: The manufacturer says 6 years and up but I found the directions are more suited to 7 or 8 and up although you certainly can adapt this game to younger kids, since Teenage Ninja Turtles are so hot right now.

On the Farm Who’s In the Barnyard by Ravensburger

This farm set with characters, vehicles and animals is a puzzle, pretend play set and first game all in one. Open the barn like a book, identifying all the animals and objects from pigs, chicks and bunnies to tools and bales of hay. Talk through the illustrations on the outside of the barn with the fruit stand, conveyor with bales of hay and parked tractor. Kids love to snap out the windows and door as a puzzle experience so they can peer inside, or even play a game of peek-a-boo. Add the base and roof and you have a perfect house for your barnyard friends to practice your animal sounds as kids match and place your cut-out figures next to corresponding pictures on the barn. Take the play up a notch with a matching game as you switch game figures and others have to guess who moved! This set is so open-ended, I used it for several activities with 2 year-olds. Here are some speech and language skills to build:

  • Teach animal sounds, as you play with the corresponding figures.
  • Articulation. I had plenty of /p/ and /h/ words to model with this set.
  • Pretend play as the barn is built and animals can move in and out of the play scheme.
  • Verbs, and prepositions can be modeled as you play with this set.

Suggested age: 2 years and up. I’d say this is best for the toddler set. Excellent educational suggestions are included in the box so this is also a good product to suggest to parents who would like some assistance in how to encourage language learning with this toy.

WordARound by Thinkfun

I never knew reading in circles could be so much fun! Each round card has blue, red and black concentric circles, with a single word written in each ring. Players race to unravel the word and shout it out to win a card. Flip the card over and you will see what color ring to examine on the next round, searching for a word. With no beginning or end to the word, players look for patterns, prefixes and suffixes like “ant,” in “hesitant” and ” er,” in “finger.” I found myself looking for consonants to start a word, until other players beat me at “uneven” and “almost,” leading me to factor in initial vowels too. Some cards flipped over to present the word so I could read it easily like “porcupine,” which made for an easy turn. Starting anywhere on the ring and sounding out the string of sounds also brought results as players recognized parts of words like “typical.” WordARound is addictive, and watch out because little clients can beat you at this! I use it for:

  • Vocabulary: Discuss meanings and practice using new words.
  • Reading: Develop strategies to find words in the circle.
  • Articulation carryover for older kids.

Suggested age: 10 years and up

What’s It? by Peaceable Kingdom

What’s It? is a cooperative game where players interpret doodle cards and score points for thinking alike. Roll the dice with category options such as you love it, use it, wear it, don’t want it, or make up your own category. Flip over a doodle card, start the 30-second timer and play begins. Players record at least three guesses based on the drawing and category but try to think like their fellow players. This is where I was at a bit of a disadvantage, playing with 8 year-olds. They saw buttons when I saw a pearl necklace and they saw shark teeth when I saw a zipper! Players earn points when their answers match. I’ve used this game with higher functioning kids on the autism spectrum, encouraging more abstract thinking.

  • Calling up words in categories
  • Word-finding
  • Description

Suggested age: 8 and up

Qualities by SimplyFun

SimplyFun’s game, Qualities, is a natural language catalyst and a creative way to get to know and be known by friends. Up to seven players take turns identifying and rating certain qualities in themselves, while game-mates offer up their own perceptions. “Qualities” runs off of a Preference Board as players accumulate points as they match their assessment of player’s personalities to their own judgement. What gives you the most energy… going to the park, going to a museum or organizing? Lots of conversation follows as players defend their answers with examples of that behavior. Players rate the extent to which a player is “tolerant,” “cautious,””empathic” or “sympathetic,” to name a few. The trait and value cards were a vocabulary lesson in themselves.

  • Vocabulary
  • Language of persuasion
  • Explanation of how traits are manifested in a person’s actions or activities
  • Abstract thinking

Suggested age: 12 years and up. This game is great with adults too.

Disclosure: The above games were provided for review by their companies.

Sherry Y. Artemenko MA, CCC-SLP, has worked with children for more than 35 years to improve their speech and language, serving as a speech language pathologist in both the public and private school systems and private practice.

The Top 10 Take-aways for CSD Work With Families

familyportraitAccording to my dusty hardcover Webster’s dictionary, a family is defined as: All the people living in the same house; household, 2) a social unit consisting of parents and the children they rear…” (Neufeldt, V, 1988). Since this was dated, I thought I should go to The Free Encyclopedia – Wikipedia. They define family as: “In human context, a family is a group of people affiliated by consanguinity, affinity, or co-residence. In most societies it is the principal institution of the socialization of children…”

In our profession, we have had to make a mind shift from client-based services to the child to family-centered services focused on collaborating with and supporting the family. In this partnership, all people involved acknowledge that each possesses unique skills and knowledge, and they demonstrate trust and respect for one another. Professionals recognize the decision making power of the parent.

Why is family-centered care important? Outcomes! For a child to reach his or her fullest potential, it is essential to have appropriate resources, qualified professionals and family involvement. In family partnerships, families receive support not only from professionals, but from other families with similar circumstances and from the community at large.

Here are the top 10 take-aways for the next time you work with a family:

10) Time. As a professional everything is fast paced. After all time is money — and you serve a lot of people. For a parent, however, time is very slow; they are constantly waiting.

9) Don’t make assumptions or generalizations. Every family is unique with very specific needs. Present all options…don’t be biased in what you say.

8) Don’t label families—or each other.

7) Don’t make inappropriate comments about your profession. Talking negatively about your workplace or another professional reflects poorly on you. The average “wronged” customer will tell 25 others about the bad experience. Don’t reinforce negative experiences.

6) Be confident but not arrogant.

5) Communicate! Communicate! And communicate some more! You cannot overstate anything. Monitor your tone of voice, body language, rate of speech, and be mindful of professional jargon.

4) Listen! Listen! And listen some more! Show the family you are listening (body language). Provide feedback, defer judgment, and don’t try to rescue—empathize.

3) Acknowledge the parent’s efforts and strengths. No matter how small it is — acknowledge something positive.

2) Keep in mind the lack of consistency in our field. Families will see a variety of specialists, and each will provide an opinion about what the parents should do. “This method is better because”…or “You should try this.” The various opinions can be confusing and overwhelming for the family. Be respectful of one another.

1) Respect and patience. Remember parents are people too!

To learn more about family support and family-centered practices, check out the transcript of an “Ask the Expert” online chat about these services, held April 30 by ASHA Special Interest Group  9, Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood.

Tamala Selke Bradham, PhD, CCC-A, is coordinator of ASHA Special Interest Group 9, Hearing and Hearing Disorders in Childhood. She is also associate director of quality, protocols, and risk management in the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences at Vanderbilt University. She and Joni Alberg, PhD, executive director of BEGINNINGS for Parents of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing, Inc., in Raleigh, N.C., answered questions during the SIG 9 online chat.

Collaboration Corner: Time to Reflect and Give Thanks

 

 

blog may 16“Though our experience of knowing is individual, knowledge is not.”

(Wenger, E., McDermott, R., & Snyder, W. [2002]. Cultivating communities of practice. Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press. p. 10)

This time of year is frenzied; closing up the school year, planning for next year. I have students moving up to middle school, and little ones coming up from preschool. When my brain and emotions start to wonder, I make a conscience effort to slow down. Stop. Reflect.

I thought this would be the perfect venue to pay thanks to the professionals whose collaborative efforts made my days a little lighter this year.

So here it goes (in no particular order):

Thanks to my colleagues, the inclusion facilitators,and  special educators who made sure communication goals were an integral part of each student’s IEP, and owned by all staff. Thanks for making me feel a part of your teams, even if I was traveling between buildings.

Thanks to my colleagues, the general education teachers who shared materials gave me curriculum to reinforce key concepts, and implemented language-based strategies that helped not just one child, but an entire classroom with narrative language development. There are many more examples that I could give, but suffice it to say, the art of teaching is alive and well.

Thanks to my BCBA colleagues, who understood how our disciplines can (and should) overlap in all areas of behavior, communication, academics, and even eating.

Thanks to my colleague, an English Language Learner teacher. She helped me support a language-impaired child who moved in late in the year and didn’t speak a word of English. We tag-teamed and figured out the difference between fundamental language skill deficits (word retrieval, vocabulary), and the typical obstacles expected for acquiring English. She outlined a plan and approach sensitive to the family unit and culture, which was invaluable in my decisions around goal-writing and intervention.

Thanks to my colleagues, the paraprofessionals, who sat in on all of their students’ speech and language sessions, translated my words into Spanish,  asked questions, made visuals and PECS books, programmed devices, and worked hard to make sure generalization could happen.

Thanks to my colleagues, the social workers and psychologists, who helped me understand keenly the role of emotional stability, learning readiness, and effects upon communication.

Thanks to my colleagues, the teachers for the visually impaired, who helped me set up a communication book made completely of tactile symbols, and engaged in healthy dialogue on cognition, cortical vision impairment and communication.

Thanks to my OT and PT friends, kindred spirits of the related services world who understand the value of co-treatments and interdisciplinary input for kids with complex medical and physical needs.

Thanks to my SLP colleagues who helped me keep a sense of humor in a way that only another SLP working in a public school can understand.

Finally, thanks to the administrators who continue to believe in inclusion, and supported my time this year in each of their buildings. Leadership doesn’t happen in a bubble, and has transformative affects upon the school culture and inclusion.

So thanks. Happy spring…..fewer than 40 days to go!

 

 

Kerry Davis, Ed.D, CCC-SLP, is a city-wide speech-language pathologist west of Boston. Her areas of interest include working with children with multiple disabilities, inclusion in education and professional development. The views on this blog are my own and do not represent those of my employer. Dr. Davis can be followed on Twitter at @DrKDavisslp.

How Bombs and Other Loud Booms Can Damage Hearing—and How People Can Get Help

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We live in a time of constant exposure to loud sounds. Some of them are completely unexpected and earsplitting, such as last month’s blasts at the Boston Marathon and explosions at the fertilizer plant in West, Texas, or the roadside bombs constantly encountered by military service members overseas.

The newspapers and television media share some of the awful lingering effects for survivors, particularly the physical and psychological trauma. Occasionally the media comment on the disorientation and temporary effects on hearing. But we seldom learn of the long-term effects that many of the survivors experience, especially in relation to hearing loss.

The hearing system is a wonderful and a very delicate tool that allows us to hear a wide range of sounds and words. We take our hearing ability for granted until something occurs to disrupt it. We attend a thunderous rock concert, watch booming 4th of July fireworks or listen to our electronic devices on top volume. Afterward we notice that we are not able to hear clearly for a while. But then our hearing gradually returns to what seems like normal, and we expose ourselves to that same noise again and again. Each time we do this, we increase the likelihood that our hearing will gradually be permanently affected—and we cannot get it back. This deterioration happens because the tiny sensory hair cells of the inner ear get destroyed. These cannot be restored!

Those who happened to near the Boston Marathon bombings were rendered disoriented and unable to hear by the sudden blasts. Some may have found their hearing improving and feeling OK by the next day. But others may now have a noise in their head that is either constant or intermittent—the result of the huge blast their ears were exposed to. These people may find it useful to speak with an audiologist about reducing the effects of this noise on their lives.

Others exposed to the blast may not be able to hear as well as they could before this traumatic event. Their speech may be unclear, or even greatly reduced, and they may hear themselves quite loudly but cannot hear others when they speak. They may wonder at the fact that others next to them have no such permanent effects. All of us are different. And for some reason, some of us can tolerate loud sounds a lot better than others and don’t seem to react as much as others. There is no way to predict at present who can tolerate loud sounds versus who cannot.

What can a person do when there has been a long-term effect on hearing? There are two groups of people who specialize in hearing disorders: Physicians who are ear, nose and throat specialists, and those who are doctors of audiology (audiologists). An audiologist has the training and knowledge to treat hearing disorders, and the physician is trained to treat medical issues related to hearing. Audiologists help those with noise in the ear or hearing loss reduce these effects. Physicians work to repair problems in the ear with medication and surgery.

But a physician’s work may not be enough to solve the problem, and that is when an audiologist may provide the most assistance. The important take-home message is that you do not have to live with deteriorating hearing. Reach out to audiologists and physicians, who can help you continue functioning well in society and access a high quality of life.

 

James Blair, PhD, CCC-A, is a professor of audiology at Utah State University and an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Group 8, Public Health Issues Related to Hearing and Balance.

Kid Confidential: Teaching Our Kids About “Tricky People”

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We’ve all heard of “stranger danger” and have probably taught our own children about the concept.  Don’t go anywhere or get into a car with anyone you don’t know.  As speech-language pathologists we may have even discussed this as part of our safety topics along with fire safety, learning about law enforcement and teaching our students how to dial 911.  We may even talk about “stranger danger” when we are targeting problem solving and reasoning skills for those students with social communication or cognitive delays.   But is “stranger danger” the best way to teach our children to be aware of adults, teenagers, or even same age peers that may hurt them?  According to the American Psychological Association’s web article, titled “Child Sexual Abuse: What Parents Should Know,” 30% of predators of sexual abuse are family members, while it is estimated that an additional 60% of predators are non-family members but are known to the child (i.e. family friends, caregivers, neighbors, etc.).  Considering 90% of all child sexual abuse cases occur by someone the child knows, is “stranger danger” really accurate?  I’m not so sure anymore.

I recently became aware of Safely Every After, Inc, a company devoted to child safety that focuses on teaching children and adults ways to identify the “tricky people” in our lives because many times “tricky people” are not strangers at all.  Pattie Fitzgerald, owner of Safely Every After, Inc., has been advocating for child safety for more than 10 years and has a number of wonderful free resources on her website including prevention tips, red flags for parents/adults, safety rules for children, internet safety rules and cyberbullying guidelines.  Pattie educates children of all ages as young as 3 years of age.  For preschool age children (3-5 years), she has written a book titled, No Trespassing-This is MY Body!, which discusses what “thumbs up” and “thumbs down” touch is and that children are the “boss of their own bodies.”  She also presents her information to schools and offers workshops for children grades K-4 (Kidz-Power) and grades 5-8 (Play it Safe!).  Additional workshops for kids and adults such as Internet Safety and Social Media and Protect the Children You Teach geared toward educators and school staff are also available.  If you think your school could benefit from a presentation by Pattie, feel free to refer your administrator to her website for more information.

So who are “tricky people”?  According to Pattie, here are just a few red flags that you are with a “tricky person”:

  1. This person continually tries to arrange for “alone time” with children;
  2. He/she befriends one particular child and lavishes gifts upon him/her;
  3. He/she frequently offers to babysit or “help out” for free;
  4. He/she insists on being physical with a child especially when the child seems uneasy or has asked the person to stop; and
  5. He/she blurs boundaries of physical touch or uses inappropriate words to comment on a child’s looks or body.

Tricky people can be a stranger or someone the child knows.  A tricky person can be a friend of the child’s parent or a family member.  Tricky people are everywhere and we need to listen to our instincts when we get that “uh-oh” feeling.  These are the things Pattie and her crew at Safely Every After, Inc., advocate teaching children and adults.

Granted, as SLPs in schools, clinics, and private practice, we may not be permitted to discuss the topics of touch with our students depending on parental preference.  However, we can discuss and teach general safety rules.  For example, the second rule on Pattie’s “Super-Ten Safe-Smart Rules for Kids and Grownups” is that a child must know his/her name, address, phone number, and parents’ cell phone numbers in case of an emergency.  We as SLPs do work on having our students answer biographical information questions so this rule works perfectly within our therapy goals.  A few more examples of rules that would go nicely with targeting problem solving and reasoning skills are rules three, four, and five that state “Safe grownups don’t ask kids for help.  They go to other adults for assistance,” or “I never go anywhere or take anything from someone I don’t know no matter what they say,” and “I always check first and get permission before I go anywhere, change my plans, or take something even if it’s from someone I know.”  There are several other safety rules that can be discussed when targeting reasoning and problem-solving skills in a safe way and I encourage you to read all about them on Pattie’s website.

So why, during ASHA’s Better Speech and Hearing Month, am I discussing the topic of child safety?  Well, who better to modify and explain child safety rules to our communication-delayed children, than SLPs?  Who better to determine if our children have the capacity to communicate when and how they have been hurt? Who better than the programmers of our non-verbal students’ AAC devices, to make sure there is language available for our students to express when they are hurting?   Who better, than us, to prepare our students for safety over the summer months?  In fact, we, as SLPs, may be the first adults to successfully broach the topic of safety with our students as we can modify and adapt information to the child’s level of comprehension.  So my question is, who better than us?

Disclaimer:  I am not, nor have I ever received payment or any form of compensation from Pattie Fitzgerald or Safely Ever After,Inc. for writing this blog article.  My purpose for writing this article is purely for educational purposes to share the knowledge I have recently learned and found on this website.  Use this information at your discretion.

 

Maria Del Duca, M.S. CCC-SLP, is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in southern, Arizona.  She owns a private practice, Communication Station: Speech Therapy, PLLC, and has a speech and language blog under the same name.  Maria received her master’s degree from Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania.  She has been practicing as an ASHA certified member since 2003 and is an affiliate of Special Interest Group 16, School-Based Issues.  She has experience in various settings such as private practice, hospital and school environments and has practiced speech pathology in NJ, MD, KS and now AZ.  Maria has a passion for early childhood, autism spectrum disorders, rare syndromes, and childhood Apraxia of speech.  For more information, visit her blog or find her on Facebook.

Believe It Or Not: The Common Core Standards Can Make Your Job Easier

shutterstock_15584677The Common Core State Standards have changed my life.  I know that’s a bold statement to make, but armed with simple resources and the confidence that I really am integrating the curriculum and assessing academic impact, working as a school based speech-language pathologist is suddenly more fulfilling. And yes, we are talking about the same Common Core State Standards. While some teachers seem to be quivering in their boots about the prospects of implementing the Standards, I think speech-language pathologists should be rejoicing.

Now I’m not going to tell you about the oodles of research that went into developing them (for history on Common Core State Standards, go to the CCSS website and look under ELA Appendices A), nor will I lecture about why you should use them (let someone else do that). I’m here to show you why they changed my practice from a speech-language lens and how it has not only improved my treatment but strengthened my clinical skills too.

Sometimes, as therapists, we can find it hard to know what a child should be able to do when all we see are students with delays, disorders and disabilities. What is grade level, age appropriate and just plain old typical can become confusing when you don’t have a set of norms to compare to. With the added pressure on school-based SLPs to be curriculum- related and demonstrate academic impact, it has been a personal relief for me to simply look up a standard and think, “so that is what my student is expected to do.” Even if you aren’t based in a school but work with school-age clients, the Common Core State Standards can still guide your treatment decisions.

The Common Core State Standards can look overwhelming, but the English Language Arts curriculum is probably the most useful for speech-language pathologists. It focuses on reading, writing, listening and speaking and language. What may seem cumbersome at first will soon become ingrained and you will start to see just how our profession and scope of practice is present in almost every learning outcome. A very simple idea of how different areas of speech-language pathology relate to the curriculum is demonstrated below.

Reading: Focuses on the reading continuum from foundational skills to fluency and integration of knowledge. Areas include phonological awareness, answering key details, identifying main ideas, description, comparing and contrasting, sequencing and retelling.

Writing: Focuses on written compositions of a variety of genres (for example, narratives, explanatory and arguments). Areas include sequencing, linking words, description and comprehension.

Speaking and Listening: Focuses on oral and receptive and expressive language skills. Areas include syntax, pragmatics, narrative skills and comprehension.

Language: Focuses on grammatical conventions and vocabulary. Areas include vocabulary acquisition, syntax, morphology and higher-level language skills such as multiple meaning words.

Most SLPs already know just how much of learning is dependent on language and communication skills. So I encourage you to think outside the box and use the Common Core State Standards in a number of different ways:

  • Refer to them to write grade level Individualized Education Program goals.
  • Use the horizontal/vertical progressions (below) to help with step up/downs in treatment.
  • Use the standards to help guide informal assessments. Take a language sample and compare to the standards’ Language section or do some classroom observations to understand academic impact.
  • If teachers are still unsure of your role and scope, why not do an in-service and use the standards as a reference. This could help with collaboration, response-to-intervention and moving toward working in the classroom.

You can go straight to the Common Core State Standards site and view the English Language Arts Standards, but keep your eye out for ways other states present the standards. Maine breaks down them down into vertical progressions (view writing, language, speaking and listening) so you can see how each skill develops each year, while Arizona provides the standards in a horizontal progression.

Download the free Common Core State Standards app. I love the ease of swiping through the standards, as it is much faster than flipping through papers. Finally, ASHA’s Common Core State Standards: A Resource for SLPs also includes great information and resources for speech-language pathologists. Be sure to click on “Resources and References” to access articles, blogs and useful sites.

Remember, the Common Core Standards are coming to a school district to you soon, so why not start getting familiar with them now?

 

Rebecca Visintin, CCC-SLP,  is an Australian-trained, school-based speech-language pathologist  in Washington state. She has worked in the Australian outback and Samoa and provides information for SLPs working abroad and free therapy resources on her site Adventures in Speech Pathology.

 

Snap and Post Photos of Your Day to the ASHA Leader Instagram Contest

instagram blog 2Say “cheese!” The new ASHA Leader is commemorating its inaugural year by celebrating YOU. We’re putting together a book of photographs that showcase what our members do best—helping people communicate. And we want your Instagram photos to be a part of it!

Ah, Instagram. I never go on a walk without my phone/camera, just in case a moment presents itself. There’s a walking loop near ASHA’s headquarters that’s about a mile long, and on nice days it’s a great way to blow off some steam, get some fresh air and remember there is a world outside your cubicle. But it’s also inhabited by trees, birds, flocks of geese, various corporate buildings and some shockingly obnoxious D.C. metro intersections, all of which make great fodder for Instagram.

Maybe you do it, maybe you don’t, but unless you’ve been living in a cave in the wilderness, you’ve undoubtedly heard about Instagram. It’s a photo app that allows users to filter, modify, and edit their photos any way the imagination allows. Many Instagrams start out looking like any digital photo, but end up looking like anything from quirky postcards to beautiful pieces of art. Check out the app and download it to your phone at Instagram.com. Then hop on over to Webstagram online to see millions of snapshots of life from around the globe. For Instagram examples from the Leader staff, go to Webstagram and look under the hashtag #ashaigers. Hey, sometimes your inner artist works, sometimes it doesn’t, but it’s always fun to try!

Because it’s so cool and we know you all have great stuff to share, we want to see your Instagrams. We know you work hard, have fun and blow off steam—show us! We want to see Instagram photos of your typical day as a speech-language pathologist, audiologist or researcher. How do you start your day? What moments during the work day or after hours are especially meaningful? Joyful? Or even particularly frustrating? Be creative and unique with your camera shots—capture the essence of your day and the landscape in which you live it (search the hashtag #ashaigers to see some staff examples).

The dates of the contest are May 12-18. The theme is “A Week in the Life of the Professions.” Upload your photos (put whatever filters or edits on them as you see fit) and be sure to include the hashtag #ashaigers in the caption.

Don’t have Instagram? E-mail your photos to leader@asha.org with the subject line “Instagram” and we’ll upload them for you.

After May 18, we (the Instagram-delirious Leader staff) will select the most memorable photos for inclusion in an orderable book. We’ll also feature as many of those selected as we can in our July issue! Everyone included in the book will receive credit and recognition; through a random drawing, 20 contributors will receive a free copy.

And we’re going to keep the photo fun going after May 18, selecting from photos you continue uploading to #ashaigers for a new recurring “Glimpses” feature in The ASHA Leader.  So c’mon folks! Grab your cameras, fancy-frame your subjects and settings, and get snapping and uploading! We want the book to be a memorable, lasting revelation of one week in the lives of speech-language pathologists, audiologists and speech-language scientists making a difference.

#ashaigers

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Gary Dunham, is editor-in-chief of The ASHA Leader and can be reached at gdunham@asha.org.