Therapy Fun with Ready Made Fall and Halloween Bingo

 

There are many fun therapy activities you can do with your preschool and school aged clients in the fall. One of my personal favorites is bingo. Boggles World, an online ESL teacher resource actually has a number of ready made materials, flashcards, and worksheets which can be adapted for speech language therapy purposes. For example, their Fall and Halloween Bingo comes with both call out cards and a 3×3 and a 4×4 (as well as 3×3) card generator/boards. Clicking the refresh button will generate as many cards as you need, so the supply is endless! You can copy and paste the entire bingo board into a word document resize it and then print it out on reinforced paper or just laminate it.

Fall vocabulary words include: corn, crops, farmer, scarecrow, apples, acorns, oak leaf, maple leaves, ginkgo leaves, grapes, mushrooms, salmon, geese, squirrel, jacket, turkey, Jack-O’-Lantern, rake, pumpkins, harvest moon, hay, chestnuts, crow, and sparrow

Halloween vocabulary words include: witch, ghost, skeleton, skull, spider, owl, Jack-O’-Lantern, devil, cobweb, graveyard, clown, pirate, robot, superhero, mummy, vampire, bat, black cat, trick or treaters, alien, werewolf

Now the fun begins!

Some suggested activities:

Phonological Awareness:

  • Practice Rhyming words (you can do discrimination and production activities): cat/bat/ trick/leaf/ rake/moon
  • Practice Syllable and Phoneme Segmentation  (I am going to say a word (e.g., ghost, spider, alien, etc) and I want you to clap one time for each syllable or sound I say)
  • Practice Isolation of initial, medial, and final phonemes in words ( e.g., What is the beginning/final  sound in mummy, vampire, robot, etc?) What is the middle sound in bat/cat/geese/rake etc?
  • Practice Initial and Final Syllable and Phoneme Deletion in Words  (Say spider! Now say it without the der, what do you have left? Say trick, now say it without the /t/ what is left; say corn, now say it without the /n/, what is left?)

Articulation/Fluency:

  • Practice production of select sounds/consonant clusters that you are working on or just production at word or sentence levels with those clients who just need a little bit more work in therapy increasing their intelligibility or sentence fluency.

Language:

  • Practice Categorization skills via convergent and divergent naming activities: Name Fall words, Name Halloween Words, How many trees  whose leaves change color can you name?, how many vegetables and fruits do we harvest in the fall? etc.
  • Practice naming Associations: what goes with a witch (broom), what goes with a squirrel (acorn), etc.
  • Practice providing Attributes via naming category, function, location, parts, size, shape, color, composition, as well as accessory/necessity.  For example, (I see a pumpkin. It’s a fruit/vegetable that you can plant, grow and eat. You find it on a farm. It’s round and orange and is the size of a ball. Inside the pumpkin are seeds. You can carve it and make a jack o lantern out of it).
  • Practice providing Definitions: Tell me what a skeleton is. Tell me what a scarecrow is.
  • Practice naming Similarities and Differences among semantically related items: How are pumpkin and apple alike? How are they different?
  • Practice explaining Multiple Meaning words:   What are some meanings of the word bat, witch, clown, etc?
  • Practice Complex Sentence Formulation: make up a sentence with the words crops and unless, make up a sentence with the words skeleton and however, etc.
  • Or you can just make up your own receptive, expressive and social  pragmatic language activities to go along with these games.

So join in the fun and start playing!

(This post originally appeared on the Smart Speech Therapy LLC blog)

 

Tatyana Elleseff MA CCC-SLP, is a bilingual speech language pathologist with a full-time hospital affiliation (UMDNJ) and a private practice (Smart Speech Therapy LLC) in Central, NJ. She received her MA from NYU and her Bilingual Extension Certification from Columbia University. She specializes in working with bilingual, multicultural, internationally and domestically adopted at risk children with complex medical, developmental, neurogenic, psychogenic, and acquired communication disorders.

11 Tips for the 2012 ASHA Convention

I am officially excited about ASHA 12. (Not that I haven’t been since last year in San Diego). I hope to meet many of my readers, Facebook and Twitter friends at ASHA in Atlanta this year. I figured it’s that time of year that I should post a little bit about my recommendations in preparation for ASHA.

  1. If you don’t already have one, create a Twitter and Facebook account. Join SLP groups and on Twitter, find the #Slpeeps. I am @apujo5 on Twitter. Benefits of social networking for the ASHA convention? You get all the heads-up on the behind-the-scenes info. You meet great new friends so that you don’t have to be at the conference alone. You can also find someone to share a room and save a little money. There is a “tweet-up” on Friday at 5 pm in the Leader Lounge where you can meet the people behind the Twitter handles. This year we are having a “pre-conference” dinner and there are several that met up last year staying in the same hotel.
  2. Pack comfortable clothes and shoes. Yes, as professionals we often dress nicely, but trust me, you will appreciate the Nikes and jeans. Last year I was away from my hotel room from 7 a.m. until about 11 p.m. I was EXHAUSTED and just missing my comfy clothes. You can learn new information whether you are in a dress or in a pair of jeans! (Besides, if this is your first convention, the exhibit hall is ENORMOUS!)
  3. Bring a backpack. I personally am not a huge fan of the infamous Super Duper bags. Not only do they stink, they are not all that comfortable to haul around. There are so many freebies at ASHA, you definitely need something supportive to carry your stuff. If your backpack is big enough, you can stuff a Super Duper bag into it.
  4. Bring your phone, tablet and your charging cords. No matter how great your battery is, you will more than likely need to charge it at some point during the day. Especially if you are one of those #Slpeeps who tweet throughout the entire convention. There are also chargers you can bring for your phone that you don’t have to plug in during a session. Last year I purchased the iGo Green charger. You plug it in to charge overnight and can use it to charge up to two devices while it’s charging. While you’re sitting in a course, you can plug in your phone (doesn’t have to be an iPhone) and charge it from anywhere in a room. No mad dash for a seat close to an outlet needed. Also, by bringing a tablet, you eliminate the need to haul around pens and notebooks.
  5. The scheduler for ASHA is finally up! So many people are so overwhelmed by the seeming millions of available sessions to attend. I am a very visual person, so I have to do everything a little different for scheduling. I have to make my own calendar, then highlight all the sessions I want to attend and put the session number on the calendar. I then narrow my sessions down to two per time slot. Be sure you select some alternate courses as there are times you get to the convention and some of the courses/posters have been cancelled.
  6. It’s never too early to start packing. The more you plan what you need to take, the more prepared you will be! I personally do much better if I pack early because I will inevitably remember things I need to take later on. Also, the more room you can make in your bag the better. (Remember, the exhibit hall is ENORMOUS and full of wonderful FREE items. You can also purchase many items at a discounted rate!)
  7. Make sure you sign up for all the freebies. The opening party, awards ceremony and closing party are actually a lot of fun. Better yet, they’re also free! You are already spending all that money on registration anyway. The conference also offers a box lunch for a small price (I think $7 a day). It really beats having to fight crowds at restaurants and all the waiting (giving you more time at the exhibit hall). The boxed lunches are pretty decent and quite affordable.
  8. Prepare to have FUN. The ASHA convention is a blast. It takes forever for it to come around every year, but once it starts, the time flies. There is so much to do and so many people to meet. Prepare for one of the greatest  convention experiences of your life!
  9. Don’t forget, leave some time for socializing and the exhibit hall. You won’t regret it. There is an enormous amount of knowledge to learn from all the exhibitors. (Did I mention that many give away free items?)
  10. If you really can’t find a session you want to attend during a certain time period, you can always do poster sessions. Remember you can do six posters for every 90 minute time slot!
  11. Also, I have found the greatest app. If you are attending ASHA with friends, and split up, download Voxer. It turns your phone into a walkietalkie and is available for both the iPhone and Android phones.

For first-timers, the ASHA convention can be very overwhelming, but in the end is definitely worth the exhaustion!

(Tiffani is one of the official ASHA Convention bloggers. These three bloggers were selected to blog about the ASHA Convention in exchange for complimentary registration. Stay tuned for more insights from her and the other bloggers before, during and after convention.)

 

Tiffani Wallace, CCC-SLP, has been an SLP specializing in Dysphagia for over 11 years. Tiffani has been very active in the social media world, creating two Facebook groups, Dysphagia Therapy Group and Dysphagia Therapy Group-Professional Edition. Tiffani is also the co-author of the app Dysphagia2Go, available on iTunes. She is preparing to travel nationally and speak on the topic of Dysphagia. Tiffani writes a blog called Dysphagia Ramblings and is the author of www.dysphagiaramblings.com. She is a five time ACE awardee and recently obtained her BRS-S.

How to Use and Set up Guided Access on iOS 6.0

Apple never stops impressing me with their always evolving nature. With the release of iOS 6.0, one of the most anticipated features for the special education community is a well-designed accessibility feature called ” Guided Access”.

During my many presentations, I have seen therapists come up with creative ideas to get students to stop exiting a specific application by pressing the home button on their iPads. I have seen therapists use bub caps which reduce the sensitivity on the home button and even tongue depressors to make the child stay focused on one application. Those days are OVER! Apple has given us the guided access that allows adults to set up a password so that the iPad can stay on the same application and disable the home button from exiting the application without that password.  Do you want to know how to set up guided access? On today’s episode, GeekSLP TV #33, I demonstrate how to access, set up and use one feature that will help children learn and become more efficient in using their iPad for communication. Here is the episode for you:

(This post originally appeared on GeekSLP.com)

 

Barbara Fernandes is a trilingual Speech- Language pathologist, a geek  and an app developer. She is the founder and CEO of Smarty Ears Apps , a company that creates apps for speech therapy. Barbara is also the face behind GeekSLP TV, a blog and video podcast focusing on the use of technology in speech therapy. Barbara has also been a practicing speech therapist both in Brazil and in the United States. Barbara has created over 21 applications for the mobile devices for speech therapists.

 Going to the 2012 ASHA Convention? Barbara Fernandes will be presenting a short course on November 14 “The iPad and Your Therapy – Apps, Accessories, Accessibility and Features,” as well as sessions PC04 “The iPad & Your Therapy: Apps, Accessories, Accessibility, & Features (Invited)” and 1179 “Using Apps to Assess & Treat Articulation & Phonological Delays.”

Appdapted: Halloween Themed Apps

Halloween is going to be here before we know it, so spend some time now and stock up on some great quality Halloween themed apps!  I have always enjoyed working on Halloween themed activities throughout the month of October and I now really enjoy having my clients  interact with Halloween themed apps. I know some you school SLPs out there aren’t allowed to call these activities “Halloween themed” and usually have to go with “Fall Festival” or use some other workaround title.

Here is a list, in no particular order, of 16 of my favorite Apps to use for Halloween. Some of them have a direct Halloween theme and others are themed around  spooky or scary things. Keep an eye out for the apps that are labeled HIGHLY RECOMMENDED, as these will be of immediate use to you in your therapy sessions.

Screen shot of my Halloween folder

1) Halloween Shelf   – Free  (5 years and up)

This is a fun little app that is essentially a soundboard. You can use it for cause and effect, predicting, etc… My favorite us of it and do this with other sound board apps is to use it for sound effects.   I have some of my higher functioning clients write a scary story and then read it and use the soundboard like an “old timey” radio show. They really enjoy hitting the sound effects and then listening to a recording of their story.

2) iBlower Series: Magic Halloween – Free (Toddler and up)  HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

This is pretty cool cause and effect app because you are able to activate the animations using your hands, voice, or by blowing into the mic. The blowing into the mic feature is neat because you can have some lower functioning kiddos interacting with the app as well or even higher functioning if you want to work on some production of lip rounding or just work on basic imitation skills.

3) Monster Mash Lite- Free (Toddler and Up)

Working on describing skills? This app allows you to create monsters with a different head, torso, and legs. This can be a fun app to use in a barrier type game, where the child creates their monster and the therapist has to then draw the monster based on the child’s description of it.

4) Monster Booth- Free ( Middle School and Up)

This app is definitely for the older kids as it is slightly gross and contains aspects of blood and gore. You take a picture of the person you want to turn into a monster and then apply the overlays. Perhaps you can turn it into a what do you want to before Halloween game? So if you have some older middle school students and above this might be a great app to use if they can handle it without laughing and not being mature.

5) Treat Street- $.99 ( Toddler and UpHIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

This is a fabulous app if you want to work on role-playing skills or just practice saying “trick or treat”. To play, you dress your character up in their costume and then head out down your street ringing the door bell or knocking on the door. The door opens and you get a treat for your bag. You are also able to monitor the treats in your bag as you go along in the game and can practice sorting skills at the end of the game by sorting all the treats in the bag.

6)  Carve-A-Pumpkin from Parents MagazineFree (Toddler and up) HIGHLY RECOMMENDED

The app store as a bunch of carver your own pumpkin apps but I like this one the best. You are able to carve both free hand or use templates .

7) Monster Me- Free ( Toddler and Up)

Monster Me is a pretty cool Augmented Reality App that has a mad scientist feel to it.  You line up your head on-screen with the guidelines and click play and virtual mask is overlay-ed over your face.  You can change your eyes, nose, and mouth while wearing the mask or have fun and click randomized for a totally mad creation!!!

8) Ask Ya Mummy- Free  ( Elementary and up)

Working on answering “yes” and “no” questions? Is it boring  and tedious? Well invite a Mummy into your therapy session.  Ask Ya Mummy randomly answers questions you ask with a “yes” or a “no”. You can have fun by have the child gauge if the mummy was ”right” or “wrong” when answering the question.  The app can also be used as a soundboard as well.

9) Peek a boo Trick or Treat $1.99 (Toddler) iPad, iPhone, Nook, Kindle, Android  HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

Night and Day studios have a fun series of Peek A Boo apps and this is their latest edition.  Knocking on the door causes it to open revealing 1 of 14 Halloween themed characters. The only thing I don’t really like is the fact that you are knocking on the door and finding a character and it should really be the other way around. You should be answering the door to greet one of the characters. It’s cute and fun nonetheless!

10) My Monster Voice- Free  (Toddler and Up)  iPad

Want to sound like a monster?  This app comes with 3 preset high pitch monsters, 2 low pitch monsters, and a custom setting.  Select your monster, record your message, and hit play and start laughing at how silly the voice sounds.

11) Go Away Big Green Monster! $2.99 ( Toddler and Up)  iPad HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

I am sure you have used this at some point with a felt board activity or just reading the book, as this book as been around for quite some time. It offers a treasure trove of possible activities from just working on the word “go”, parts of the face,  to describing activities.  Just Google “Go Away Big Green Monster! activities” and you’ll see what I mean.

12) Halloween Card Creator- Free (Elementary and up)  iPad

A fun free app that allows you to make Halloween Cards! Lots of fonts, clip art, and various other customizations  Start creating your Halloween card today and share it via e-mail or Facebook!

13) What was I scared of?  By Dr Seuss $1.99 (Elementary and up)HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

A fun story about “fear” and how to handle it.  Typical Dr. Seuss rhyming pattern through the book supports good phonemic awareness.  Great to work on picture and word associations as well.

14) Spooky Playtime $2.99 (Toddler and Up) HIGHLY RECOMMENDED!!

This is one of my favorite Halloween apps. It has lots of fun mini games!! They include: Junk Food Zombie- feed the zombies and help improve their eating habits, Bat Cave- sound recognition, Haunted House- a memory and matching game, Pumpkin Patch- counting skills, Spooky Forest- candy shape and color matching, Billy Bones- fine motor and shape recognition, Sylvia’s Spider Web- letter andnumber recognition.

15) First Words Halloween $1.99 (Pre-k and up) HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

This app is based on the successful First Words Apps. I like this app because you can work by letter name or phonics and pre-select the amount of letters you want in each word. It’s useful to target CVC word for articulation or simply target some fall themed vocabulary!

16) Clicky Stick Halloween $.99 (Toddler and Up) iPad  HIGHLY RECOMMENDED 

This app is based on the award-winning app Clicky Sticky. This app will allow you to create a visual scene using “stickers” and then animate it using the play button. It’s lots of fun and can be used to enhance describing and vocabulary skills.

I hope you enjoyed the list and that you find these apps useful for therapy! Did I miss any good Halloween apps ? If so please leave a comment so I can add them to the list :)  Thanks!

 

(This post originally appeared on The Speech Guy)

Jeremy Legaspi, CCC-SLP, is a Speech-Language Pathologist at Foundations Developmental House. He concentrates on autism, AAC, apraxia, articulation,phonlogy, and some feeding. You can follow him on twitter @azspeechguy and check him out on azspeechguy.wordpress.com andwww.therapyapp411.com

Back to School Great New Games for Speech Therapy

The beginning of a new school year is always exciting for students as well as educators–I still feel the thrill several years after I’ve left the public schools to start my private practice. Everything is fresh and new–paper, name tags,  friends, teachers and backpacks. In keeping with a fresh start, I wanted to share some of my favorite new off-the-shelf products that can add a fun twist to your speech and language therapy sessions. Some of the toys and games are produced by large, international companies and some invented by ingenious educators and therapists who followed their dream and assembled a game in their garage:

Storymatic Kids by The Storymatic Corporation

Originally designed as a writing prompt by a creative writing teacher in Vermont, Storymatic Kids has taken on a life of its own. Fans are using this little box of 360 idea cards to inspire many creative endeavors beyond writing including cartooning, music, film and improvisation. Start out choosing two random yellow cards to describe your character and one blue card to get the story going. Our first story cards were “grandpa,” “bookworm,” and “here comes trouble.” Kids took off with a tale about our bookworm grandpa who was getting in trouble for losing his books, while a “mistaken identity” card had him sneaking off to the skate park to stay in shape since he was a skateboard champion. “Recess,” “befriended by a hippo” and “kiss” all had to be associated with the story and woven into the theme. It could be a jump from “recess’ to “befriended by a hippo” unless you were my little friend who linked them because the zookeeper visited the school to teach about animals. This box of thoughtfully designed cards is so portable for itinerant therapists and can be used to advance speech and language skills:

  • build vocabulary
  • associate ideas to build a coherent story
  • collaborate with classmates on storytelling or writing goals
  • carryover for stuttering and articulation therapy
  • teach elements of a good story–characters, setting, problem, solution (the only 2 rules for this game are that your character has to change through the story and stay alive–the inventor clearly understands kids!)

Recommended age: 5 and up. There is an older version called Storymatic although I have used the kids’  version with middle school students with language learning issues.

Feed the Woozle by Peaceable Kingdom

 

Preschoolers love this goofy, orange, furry creature wearing black high-tops with his signature “W” on them. His sign to “FEED ME” cannot be ignored as kids load up their spoon with wacky snack tokens like toenail toast or spider-egg pudding and make their way to Feed the Woozle without dropping their loot, depositing them in his wide open mouth. Three levels of cooperative play provide a perfect game for a group of kids of different ages. Three year-olds roll the die, count up the snacks to place on the spoon and walk carefully to feed the Woozle. Level 2 ups the ante for 4-5 year-olds as they use the spinner to direct how to move toward the Woozle–hula dance, bunny hop, spin, march, walk backwards or go crazy! Get out the blindfold for the third level, as you play with your eyes closed, relying on other players to verbally direct you to Woozle’s mouth. Here’s a tip–let’s hope your fellow players know right and left. I’ve used this game to:

  • improve social language with kids on the autism spectrum and their typical peers as they work together to feed the Woozle
  • work on following directions during the blindfold level 3
  • carryover practice for articulation

Two other great collaborative games from Peaceable Kingdom are “Seeds for the Birds” and “Race to the Treasure” where players race against an ogre which is quite motivating!

Recommended age: 3-6 years.

Jake and The Neverland Pirates Never Land Challenge by Wonder Forge

My pirate mateys loved this game as we worked as a team to complete pirate challenges and earn more gold doubloons than Captain Hook. Flip over a red and a blue doubloon to tell you the object to use, and how to use it to complete your task–”with the sword on your head, walk backwards around the vines,” or “with the cannonball under your chin, hop on one foot to the X and back.”  Kids started to ask each other, “Can you do the challenge?” and their friend replied, “Yo, Ho, Let’s go!”  Kids are so engrossed in the action, that they don’t realize the language learning involved to advance in the game. Tasks vary in difficulty from walking backwards to zig-zagging through the foam vines. We talk through each challenge, offering advice and laughing at the outcome as kids learn to:

  • Follow directions
  • Collaborate
  • Ask questions
  • Solve problems
  • Learn prepositions

Recommended age: 3 and up

FitzIt by Gamewright

Kids have such fun playing FitzIt, generating words based on multiple attribute cards they draw. My favorite was: what is usually used for entertainment, can melt, is smaller than a golf ball and doesn’t need a plug or battery? Of course, a chocolate truffle! It is such fun to see what kids create. The next player adds to the grid, using as many of his descriptor cards to connect horizontally or vertically to a card already played and announces his word to fit. FitzIt can build vocabulary and language as it requires players to think within a category as they move from general to specific,  adding additional descriptors and attributes. This little box of fun is portable speech therapy on the move.

  • Builds vocabulary
  • Encourages deductive thinking
  • Builds categories and association skills

Recommended age: 10 years and up

Morphology Jr. by Morphology Games

Morphology Jr. is like playing Pictionary only with objects, as the Morphologist picks a word card, gives the clue–which is associated with the target word, usually its category–and proceeds to “create” the word with 30 available props. Colored cubes, wooden shapes, string, rubber rings and glass drops can transform into a band-aid, bunk bed or a yawn.  Players have to continually modify their structure to add features of the concept they are trying to convey. A wooden figure with two rectangular blocks was thought to be a bird until the Morphologist did a slow and steady take-off for an airplane.  More abstract concepts like “wind,” “yell,” and “roots” required abstract thinking as the string represented the roots of a tree topped with green blocks for foliage. The kid-friendly game board is a series of lily pads, as your frog marker advances and follows the directions for various challenges including limiting the number of props available, adding sound effects (really helpful for the wind!) or becoming one of the props yourself. Kids represent a word with a series of objects, requiring them to know the essential features of the object, action or person and then guessers have to re-convert the concepts presented back to a word. Quick thinking and language processing help players identify critical differences to distinguish their word from the wrong one being guessed. What do I have to portray to show a garbage truck and not a dump truck? The discussion afterwards about how a player portrayed a word and why players guessed certain words was a helpful exercise to work on syntax, inference, or description.

  • Discuss similarities and differences
  • Builds description, object properties
  • Language processing
  • Inference

Recommended age: 8 years and up

Rory’s Story Cubes- Actions by Gamewright

Roll out this newest Rory’s Story Cubes set and start your stories. Each of the 9 cubes has 54 illustrated everyday verbs–listen, jump, draw, take, light, or press–to move the story to a new place in the plot. Similar to the original set of Rory’s Story Cubes including nouns, this set can be viewed from a concrete to more abstract perspective. I thought one figure was sleeping while another player thought he was “snooping!” Flexibility is a key value of this game as kids can tell stories solo or in a group, combine the dice with other sets, or practice verb tenses. A favorite version with my players was naming opposites as we made a tower of dice. What’s the opposite of play? Work. What’s the opposite of build? Destroy. They loved to keep going until our tower toppled! I use this set to:

  • Tell stories teaching the elements of a good story
  • Work on  verb tenses–present, past, future
  • Work on opposites
  • Use conjunctions

Recommended age: 8 years and up

Sound It! Found It! by Wowopolis

Kids are master noise-makers as they guess the sound source, and find the image of what made the sound in a related illustration. 96 sound cards are broken into categories that match the 8 scene boards illustrating kids’ events–a basketball game, carnival, rock concert, space station, haunted house, zoo, house and classroom.  A designated “Sounder” selects a card in a category, and makes the sound pictured for others to guess. The “Listeners” try to be the first to guess the sound’s source and also find it on the corresponding scene board. I heard some terrific burps, ketchup splurts and basketball whooshes.  Kids need to think on many levels–interpret the picture, generate an associated sound, match the auditory sound to a visual picture, scan a packed illustration and often look for associations (looking for the frog? find the water). The inventor of this game confided in me that his wife is a speech pathologist so we know he got some great input! Help kids:

  • Think in categories
  • Process
  • Build association skills
  • Build listening skills

Recommended age: 7 years and up

Disclosure: The above games were provided by their companies for review

(This post originally appeared on Play on Words.)

 

Sherry Artemenko M.S.CCC-SLP, a speech language pathologist for over 35 years, has  a private practice, Play on Words LLC, popular blog,www.playonwords.com, and is the founder of the PAL Awards (Play Advances Language) which distinguish the best new toys, games and books that have the DNA to build language skills in children.

 

It Really is a “Brave New World” for Speech-Language Pathology!

In 1931, Aldous Huxley’s novel A Brave New World told us a tale of what society in the distant future would look like… a place of advanced technology, new social structures and radical changes in how humanity interacts with each other… sound familiar?

Well, arranging the Georgia Speech-Language Hearing Association’s (GSHA) short course offerings has opened my eyes to how very fast the role of being an SLP is changing from year to year. We are now serving highly diverse populations of multiple nationalities, utilizing technology that just 10 years ago was science fiction and becoming more and more an integrated part of the healthcare community in general. From NICU to hospice, home health care to the public schools, SLPs are involved with communication and swallowing disorders across the lifespan. We are providing these services in a cost effective, evidence based manner that is making real and measurable change in the populations we serve.

It is with this “Brave New World” in mind, that GSHA would like to present to our fellow convention-goers three short course opportunities that are sure to make a positive impact on the clients, patients and students we all serve. ASHA has given the Georgia association the wonderful opportunity to provide ticketed pre-convention and convention related short courses on November 14th and 15th. Please join us on November 14th for-

Barbara Fernandes, M.S., CCC-SLP The iPad and Your Therapy – Apps, Accessories, Accessibility and Features

Jose Galarza, M.A., CCC-SLP Spanish Influenced English: What Every SLP Should Know

and on November 15th for-

Kate Krival, Ph. D. CCC-SLP Anticipation: Neural Bases and Clinical Implications in Swallowing in Adults

Our pre-convention activities on November 14th will include presentations from Barbara Fernandes, M.S, CCC-SLP and Jose Galarza, M.A. CCC-SLP. Barbara (better known as GeekSLP) will be presenting on all things Apple, Ipad and App related. Bring your Ipad and/or Iphone to her presentation and you will leave better understanding how to use it with your respective population. Jose’s presentation will address the needs of monolingual SLPs working with bilingual children in the school setting. Since school SLPs are increasingly faced with the communication needs of Hispanic children, his presentation is especially relevant to the English speaker attempting evaluation and treatment of those children. Barbara and Jose are both experts in their respective areas and will highly impact the attendee in a positive manner.

On November 15th, join GSHA in welcoming Kate Krival, Ph. D., CCC/SLP. Dr. Krival directs the Swallowing Research Lab at Kent State University and she is a Research Investigator in the Head and Neck Neural Interface Lab at Louis Stokes Veterans Administration Medical Center in Cleveland, OH. She is particularly interested in clinical research targeting sensory-based interventions for swallowing disorders in adults with neurogenic dysphagia. If dysphagia is your area of interest, Kate will leave you with tons of evidenced based ideas for use with your patients!

So, Join GSHA and ASHA in facing this Brave New World of ours with the confidence that these courses will keep you informed, up to date and ahead of the curve!!! See you in Atlanta…

 

Edgar V. (Vince) Clark, M. Ed., CCC/SLP, advocates for the importance of state association participation whenever possible. He is currently the GSHA to ASHA Liason for the 2012 convention, current GSHA CEU chair and is a past-president of GSHA. Professionally, he is interested in adult dysphagia, all things technology, and the use of social media for promoting the professions.

 

The ASHA Convention is quickly approaching! If you haven’t already registered, don’t delay–register today! Stay tuned to ASHAsphere in the weeks leading up to the ASHA Convention for posts by the official Convention bloggers–Jeremy LegaspiTiffani Wallace and Katie Millican. Not an official Convention blogger but want to write a post about it for ASHAsphere? No problem! Send posts to Maggie McGary at mmcgary@asha.org and it could be featured here.

ASHA’s Leadership Development Program Announces 2013 Cohorts

Graduation Cap

Photo by snowpeak

Do you aspire to expand and refine your leadership skills to drive change in your current work setting or even to become a leader within your state association or with ASHA? ASHA will once again offer its year-long Leadership Development Program (LDP) in 2013. The 2013 LDP will be focused on two different cohorts: Early Career Professionals and Speech-Language Pathologists or Audiologists in a School Setting.

Each program is limited to 30 participants selected through a competitive application process which requires applicants to submit a leadership statement as well as a description of a leadership project they’d like to pursue during the LDP.

The LDP program for Early Career Professionals will begin Saturday, May 4, with a kick-off workshop at the National Office in Rockville, Maryland. Applications for this cohort open October 9, 2012 and will close on Tuesday, December 18, 2012 at 3pm Eastern time. More information is available by visiting the ASHA website.

Speech-language pathologists or audiologists with 10 or fewer years of professional experience may apply to this year-long program that will develop their leadership skills. Preference will be given to members who belong to a Special Interest Group (SIG). Preference will also be given to past leaders of the National Student Speech-Language-Hearing Association (NSSLHA) who have no prior service on an ASHA or SIG committee, board, council, working group or task force.

Individual learning projects for the LDP for Early Career Professionals should be focused on showcasing leadership in one of the following areas:

  • Work setting
  • A related professional organization (college, university, association)

The LDP for School-Based Professionals will begin one day prior to the ASHA Schools Conference in Long Beach, California, on Thursday, July 11, 2013. Applications for this cohort will open January 24, 2013, and must be submitted by April 4, 2013 at 3pm Eastern time. This year-long program will develop essential leadership skills and help participants acquire knowledge and skills for future professional and volunteer growth. Preference will be given to members who are school based and belong to a SIG.

The LDP in Schools is open to any member who is school-based, including both speech-language pathologists and educational audiologists

Individual learning projects for LDP in Schools should be focused in one of the following key areas:

For more information on the Leadership Development Program, contact Haley Jones, volunteer operations manager, at hjones@asha.org.

 

Andrea Falzarano is Director, Association Governance Operations at ASHA.

Crickets: Beautiful Sound or Terrible Noise?

Pet Crickets, just hanging around

Photo by IvanWalsh.com

On a recent evening walk I stopped to listen to a familiar September melody: crickets singing.  In a flash the sound brought memories of the summer that had just passed by and summers that preceded it.  It also got me anticipating the season change, with colorful fall days followed by short winter ones, then melting ice and the burst of life that signals spring.  All this from a few crickets!

Attending the National Hearing Conservation Association annual convention about ten years ago I was invited to write my favorite sound on a little white index card.  That was the first time I learned of the Favorite Sounds project, and it was probably the first time I had ever thought of sound in that way.  In this ongoing study of favorite sounds, 70% of respondents have indicated they enjoy sounds categorized as “natural” whereas 30% chose “mechanical” sounds.  Further broken down this includes:

  • Natural sounds: weather related (29%); animals (29%); and human (24%)
  • Mechanical sounds: music (70%) and vehicles (13%)

Now that I am a convert to the topic, I add new favorites to my own list regularly–like crickets.  And I use Favorite Sounds as a discussion starter and writing prompt in my classes at Boston University.  It’s a good way to engage students, and if I can’t draw them out with favorite sounds, this follow-up question usually does: What are some sounds you dislike?   Through the years I’ve learned that a lot of people like the sound of crickets, but others can’t stand them–for various reasons.  One example: some people who experience tinnitus describe it as sounding like annoying crickets.  Tinnitus is a distressing condition associated with hearing loss, and with noise induced hearing loss in particular.

The topic of favorite and un-favorite sounds is relevant in hearing loss prevention and other broad questions of public health.   In the 1980’s some research groups investigated whether exposure to loud music is less risky to hearing when the music is considered by the listener to be pleasant vs. unpleasant.   Although the result of one study seemed to indicate such an effect, in general there is agreement in the research community that exposure to very loud sound is risky to hearing, enjoyable or not.   And noise can affect more than our hearing: current research suggests that exposure to noise in our daily lives is associated with stress and elevated risk of cardiovascular problems, even at levels well below those that can damage the hearing mechanism.

So whether you like the sound of crickets or close the windows when they begin their serenade, noise in the environment impacts all of us in many different ways.  Noise is one of the interesting topics addressed frequently by ASHA’s Special Interest Group 8: Public Health Issues Related to Hearing and Balance.  Join us and learn more!

References

Lindgren, F., and Axelsson, A. (1983).  Temporary threshold shift after noise and music of equal energy.  Ear & Hearing, 4(4), 197-201.

Meinke, D., Lankford, J. and Wells, L. (2002).  Collecting favorite sounds. Available online at: http://hearingconservation.org/associations/10915/files/Favorite%20Sounds%20Handout.pdf

Moudon, A. V. (2009).  Real noise from the urban environment: How ambient community noise affects health and what can be done about it. American Journal of Preventive Medicine 37(2), 167-171.

Swanson, S.J., Dengerink, H.A., Kondrick, P., and Miller, C.L. (1987).  The influence of subjective factors on temporary threshold shifts after exposure to music and noise of equal energy.  Ear & Hearing, 8(5), 288-291.

 

Ann Dix, CCC-A, grew up in a musical family and became interested in speech and hearing through her background playing and singing in rock and roll bands.   She has been a clinical faculty member of Boston University’s Speech Language and Hearing Sciences department since 1997.  Ann blogs at Now Hear This, a Boston University blog about sound and hearing. 

 

Relationship and Communication Development in Children Adopted From Abroad

When my grand-daughter was born, I made a conscious decision to visit her every month. Not only did I want to observe her development on a regular basis, I also wanted her to interact with me consistently so we could build a close and loving relationship. She is now 5 years old and we enjoy a wonderfully close relationship. When her brother was born, she had to share her mother and father with him but she was unwilling to share me. She expected her grandfather to play with her brother so that I could spend all of my time with her. Naturally, our grandson developed a close and loving relationship with his grandfather. To this day when we arrive at their house, he first asks “Where is Grandpa?” and seeks to reconnect with his grandfather before he will interact with me. Now they have a new younger brother and it will be interesting to see how his relationship with both grandparents develops.

Infants learn to communicate within the context of contingent, consistent and sensitive face-to-face communication with their caregivers. They are born expecting developmentally appropriate and nurturing care. In fact, they are dependent upon such care to thrive and survive. Through consistent, appropriate and individually sensitive interactions, infants learn how to trust their caregivers, share emotions, regulate negative emotions, and associate nonverbal communication such as facial expressions and tone of voice with certain emotions (Baldwin & Moses, 1994; Butterworth, 1994; Moses, Baldwin, Rosicky, & Tidball, 2001; Smith, 2005). These early interactions help infants learn that when they are uncomfortable they can cry and most often an adult will make them feel better. Eventually they learn to regulate their distress at the sight of the caregiver’s smiling face, when they hear their caregiver’s calming voice, or as soon as the caregiver picks them up. Infants develop trusting relationships based on the consistent and contingent care they receive from sensitive caregivers and through these relationships they learn to draw inferences from their communicative, cognitive and social interactions.

Unfortunately not all children receive positive, contingent and consistent care. Many children experience maltreatment during their infancy or toddlerhood with the majority of maltreatment cases involving neglect (Children’s Bureau, 2011). The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services describes maltreatment to include: a) physical abuse, b) sexual abuse, c) emotional abuse, or d) child neglect. Physical abuse can be physical harm of a child or placing a child at risk of being harmed such as witnessing spousal abuse. Neglect can include not meeting the child’s physical, educational, health care, or emotional needs (Hildegard & Wolfe, 2002).

Research on maltreated children provides evidence that maltreatment results in poor developmental outcomes (Wolfe, 1999). Children experiencing maltreatment have been reported to demonstrate poorer cognitive, receptive and expressive language performance and social-emotional development when compared with their peers (Culp et al., 1991; Eigsti & Cicchetti, 2004; Hildegard & Wolfe, 2002; Wolfe, 1999). Although placement into foster care families moves children into safer environments, children continue to display weaker social-emotional development and language performance and children who experience more transitions in care tend to demonstrate poorer performance (Pears & Fisher, 2005; Windsor, Glaze, Koga & the Bucharest Early Intervention Project Team, 2007).

Children who are raised in orphanages experience maltreatment (Johnson, 2000, 2005; Miller, 2005) and when adopted by families from a different country, the children often experience disrupted language acquisition.  Orphanage care in countries with few resources or poor economies, provide less than adequate care. Many orphanages operate with large child to adult ratios and provide limited health care, poor nutrition, and little to no social or educational stimulation. Once children are adopted, many of the adopted families do not speak the children’s birth language and may not have resources to provide continued instruction in the child’s birth language. Thus, the children quickly stop speaking and listening to their birth language and become monolingual speakers of their adopted language (Hwa-Froelich, 2009, 2012). Research has documented rapid acquisition of the adopted language (for a review see Hwa-Froelich, 2012). However, recent research provides longitudinal evidence of expressive language delays (Cohen, Lojkasek, Zadeh, Pugliese, & Kiefer, 2008; Gauthier & Genesee, 2011; Glennen, 2007). In a recent meta-analysis, Scott and colleagues (2011) report that international adoptees demonstrate poorer language performance on behavioral measures than on survey measures and when compared with peers rather than standardized test norms. They found that while there was great variability in language performance during the preschool ages, children adopted from abroad were not significantly different from their nonadopted peers. However, there was a greater likelihood of poorer language outcomes at school-age or older ages. In other words, maltreatment and disruption in language acquisition may place internationally adopted children at increased risk of language problems.

Early maltreatment and poor relationship development can have persistent effects on children’s communication development. Therefore, it is important for professionals to recognize, identify and report cases of maltreatment early and persistently to prevent and stop maltreatment of children. Agencies and professionals must try to provide safe and consistent caregiving environments for children removed from their families and children living in orphanages. Once children have experienced maltreatment, professionals must work closely together with children and their caregivers to facilitate the development of close, safe, and loving relationships as well as the children’s cognitive, communication, and social-emotional development. Consistent assessments to evaluate cognitive, communication, and social-emotional development longitudinally are needed. If children demonstrate developmental delays then early intervention may benefit children exposed to maltreatment and disrupted language acquisition, such as children adopted from abroad.

Disclosure: Some of the information included in this blog was taken from Hwa-Froelich, D. A. (2012). Childhood maltreatment and communication development. Perspectives on School-based Issues, 13(1), 43-53. The author discloses financial benefit from book sales.

References

Baldwin, D. A., & Moses, L. J. (1994). Early understanding of referential intent and attentional focus: Evidence from language and emotion. In C. Lewis & P. Mitchell (Eds.) Children’s early understanding of mind. Origins and development (pp. 133-156). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Butterworth, G. (1994). Theory of Mind and the facts of embodiment. In C. Lewis & P. Mitchell (Eds.) Children’s early understanding of mind. Origins and development (pp. 115-132). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.

Children’s Bureau. (2011). Child maltreatment 2010. Retrieved from http://www.acf.hhs.gov/programs/cb/stats_research/index.htm#can

Cohen, N. J., Lojkasek, M., Zadeh, Z. Y., Pugliese, M., & Kiefer, H. (2008). Children adopted from China: a prospective study of their growth and development. The Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, 49(4), 458-468. doi:10.1111/j.1469-7610.2007.01853.x

Eigsti, I-M., & Cicchett, D. (2004). The impact of child maltreatment on expressive syntax at 60 months. Developmental Science, 7(1), 88-102.

Gauthier, K., & Genesee, F. (2011). Language development in internationally adopted children: A special case of early second language learning. Child Development, 82(3), 887-901. doi:10.1111/j1467-8624.2011.01578.x

Glennen, S. (2007). Predicting language outcomes for internationally adopted children. Journal of Speech, Language and Hearing Research, 50, 529-548. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/036)

Hildeyard, K. L., & Wolfe, D. A. (2002). Child neglect: developmental issues and outcomes. Child Abuse & Neglect, 26, 679-695.

Hwa-Froelich, D. A. (2009). Communication development in infants and toddlers adopted from abroad. Topics in Language Disorders, 29(1), 27-44. doi:10.1097/01.TLD.0000346060.63964.c2

Hwa-Froelich, D. A. (2012). Supporting development in internationally adopted children. Baltimore: Paul H. Brookes.

Johnson, D. E. (2000). Medical and developmental sequelae of early childhood institutionalization in Eastern European adoptees. In C. A. Nelson (Ed.). The Minnesota Symposia on child psychology: The effects of early adversity on neurobiological development: Vol. 31. Minnesota Symposium on Child Psychology (pp. 113-162). Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

Johnson, D. E. (2005). International adoption: What is fact, what is fiction, and what is the future? Pediatric Clinics of North America, 52, 1221-1246. doi:10.1016j.pel.2005.06.008

Miller, L. (2005). The handbook of international adoption medicine. NY: Oxford University Press.

Moses L. J., Baldwin, D. A., Rosicky, J. G., & Tidball, G. (2001). Evidence for referential understanding in the emotions domain at twelve and eighteen months. Child Development, 72(3), 718-735. http://www.jstor.org/

Pears, K., & Fisher, P. A. (2005). Developmental, cognitive, and neuropsychological functioning in preschool-aged foster children: Associations with prior maltreatment and placement history. Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics, 26(2), 112-122.

Smith, A. D. (2005). The inferential transmission of language. Adaptive Behavior, 13(4), 311-324. doi:10.1177/105971230501300402

Windsor, J., Glaze, L. E., Koga, S. F., & the Bucharest Early Intervention Project Core Group. (2007). Language acquisition with limited input: Romanian institution and foster care. Journal of Speech-Language-Hearing Research, 50, 1365-1381. doi:10.1044/1092-4388(2007/095)

Wolfe, D. A. (1999). Child abuse: Implications for child development and psychopathology. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

 

Deborah Hwa-Froelich, Ph.D., CCC-SLP, is a Saint Louis University professor and Director of the International Adoption Clinic with interests in social effects on communication such as culture, poverty, parent-child interaction, maternal/child health, and disrupted development.