10 Trillion Microorganisms versus Your Toothbrush

dental

“The mouth is dirty,” Dr Kenneth Shay stated frankly; AND, it is “the biggest hole in your body!”

Warning: You may want to finish eating, brush your teeth, floss, use mouthwash, and then come back…

OR

If it is early morning, and you haven’t brushed your teeth yet: then scrape the gunk off your teeth with your fingernail. You may have found 10 billion microorganisms in that cubic millimeter.

There are 1 trillion to 10 trillion microorganisms in your mouth. Simply brushing your teeth can get rid of that nasty bacteria film in your mouth. It can also prevent “some of that schmutz” from getting into your lungs. If you are having trace aspiration (saliva, food, and/or liquids getting into your lungs), try to make what gets into your lungs less nasty. You can prevent pneumonia. Pneumonia due to poor oral care is a major avoidable infection, per Shay.

Ross & Crumpler (2006) noted that despite strong evidence in the literature on the role of brushing the teeth in preventing pneumonia, medical staff continue to view oral care as a comfort measure and only use foam swabs.

“Toothette sponges are wimpy,” stressed Shay. They don’t get the gunk (plaque) off the teeth. Plaque is sticky. If not removed, it hardens into tarter (also known as calculus). Then a visit to the dentist is needed to get it off (debridement).

Why is the mouth forgotten in healthcare? We help the dependent elder go to the bathroom many times a day. So why don’t we help brush his teeth?I’ve heard some nurses say they are squeamish about the mouth! It makes them gag! Well, we should be gagging over the costs of neglecting the mouth.

This simple prevention technique of brushing costs pennies a day against the cost of a pneumonia. Based on CDC numbers from 2011, there were 157,500 Hospital Acquired Pneumonia infections that year. CDC states the average extra cost of that hospital acquired infection is $22,875. This equals over 3 billion dollars!

Why are we not protecting this wide open gateway to the body? Imagine your gingival space between the tooth and gum as a huge parking lot. Germs love these 1-3 millimeter deep parking spaces. If germs park in the gingival space for more than 24 hours, they become calcified into plaques. Bacterial loves to stick to plaque. Only brushing removes it. No brushing leads to a build-up of plaque in the gingival space and inflammation (gingivitis).

It only takes 48 hours of hospitalization in a critically ill patient to change this bacteria from the usual gram-positive streptococci to gram-negative microorganisms (the nasty pathogenic bacteria that cause pneumonia).
Maybe we don’t brush our patients teeth because the gums bleed? Blood is okay, per Shay, even if you are on a blood thinner. Shay stated that bleeding is a sign that you need to brush more. It is due to the inflammation, and regular brushing will prevent bleeding. Shay warned that bleeding is only risky if the patient has a blood disorder or disease that causes excessive bleeding.

Most cases of gingivitis do not progress to the more serious periodontitis, but…Immune-compromising events can cause an autoimmune response that can lead to periodontitis, per Shay. Examples of immunocompromising events are not only hospitalization and critical illness; they could also be the following:

• life stressors
• flu
• depression, and
• pregnancy

Periodontitis is inflammation caused by bacteria that affects the attachment between the tooth and the bone. It is an irreversible destruction of the supporting tissues (i.e., the periodontal ligament to alveolar bone). Then bone-absorbing cells eat away at the bone. The bone will not be regenerated. Additionally, with the gums receding, “there is more surface area to collect gunk,” said Shay. The periodontal pocket that is formed creates a larger “parking garage” of 6-8 millimeters deep. Lots of gram-negative anaerobic bacteria can park there! Pathogenic microorganisms. “These are the same things that cause aspiration pneumonia,” stated Shay.

See the full blog post at www.swallowstudy.com.

Karen Sheffler, MS, CCC-SLP, BCS-S, graduated from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1995 with her master’s degree. There, she was under the influence of the great mentors in the field of dysphagia like Dr. John (Jay) Rosenbek, Dr. JoAnne Robbins, and Dr. James L. Coyle. Once the “dysphagia bug” bit, she has never looked back. Karen has always enjoyed medical speech pathology, working in skilled nursing facilities and rehabilitation centers in the 1990s, and now in acute care in the Boston area for more than 14 years. She has trained graduate student clinicians during their acute care internships for more than 10 years. Special interests include neurological conditions, esophageal dysphagia, geriatrics, end-of-life considerations, and patient safety/risk management. She has lectured on various topics in dysphagia in the hospital setting, to dental students at the Tufts University Dental School, and on Lateral Medullary Syndrome at the 2011 ASHA convention. She is a member of the Dysphagia Research Society and the Special Interest Group 13: Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders. Karen obtained her BCS-S (Board Certified Specialist in Swallowing and Swallowing Disorders) in August of 2012. You can follow her blog, www.swallowstudy.com.

Kid Confidential: Parent Education and Training, Part 1

parents

Parent education and training is not only an important part of our job as SLPs it is an essential part of our job. Still, I’ve spoken to many SLPs over social media who still feel like they are lacking this particular skill for a number of reasons.

Continue reading...

Collaboration Corner: 10 Easy Tips for Parents to Support Language

ice cream

As we make our way through the lazy days of summer, schedules change, and things relax. My usual theme is collaboration; parents can be one of our biggest assets in promoting language development. Parents of young children usually want to know what they can do to support their child’s language development in the absence of a structured day. Here are 10 suggestions.

Continue reading...

CFY (Coming For You)!

stage

There is no denying the difficulty of grad school. You’re taking classes in everything, even the stuff that might not be your cup of tea. Ideally, your clinical fellowship year is in an area you particularly enjoy and the everyday implementation of book learned skills will certainly give you many ah-ha moments. What can be difficult is the frequent observation, knowing, or maybe not knowing, that someone is on the other side of that two way mirror. There is a feeling of being constantly “on.” Even paperwork remains a performance. I would drop into bed at night, completely spent.

Continue reading...

Favorite Resources: Fiction and Non-Fiction Texts

reading

School based SLPs often look to align their intervention goals with academic content standards to increase student success in the classroom. Many of these goals align with English Language Arts standards. Goals for vocabulary, comprehension, and articulation can be targeted easily using fiction and non-fiction texts. Using reading passages is a perfect way to support reading skills and curriculum. It’s also an easy way to incorporate current events or seasonal information as well. I wanted to share four different resources I used for my caseload this year.

Continue reading...

Three Reasons Why Kids Get Hooked on “Kids’ Meals”… and How to Change That

chicken

As a pediatric SLP who focuses on feeding, one of the frequent comments I hear from parents is “As long we’ve got chicken nuggets, then my kid will eat.” Besides the obvious “just say no” solution, what parents truly are asking is, “How do I expand my kid’s diet to include more than what’s on a kids’ menu?” Whether we are considering our pediatric clients in feeding therapy or simply the garden-variety picky eater, that is an excellent question with not a very simple answer.

Continue reading...

How to Make Social Skills Stick

sticky

  At Communication Works, a private practice in Oakland, California, we’re passionate about partnering with parents and caregivers in the treatment process. When it comes to social learning, many children struggle to carry over learned skills from the therapy setting or school to their home environment. Parents are in a perfect position to help practice […]

Continue reading...

In Appreciation: Jeri Logemann

Logemann_web

Jerilyn (Jeri) Logemann, ASHA 1994 and 2000 president and a world-renowned researcher in speech-language pathology, died at age 72 on June 19, 2014, in her home surrounded by friends.

Continue reading...

In Appreciation: Glenda J. Ochsner

Ochsner_web

Glenda J. Ochsner, 2003 ASHA president, died May 29, 2014, at age 72.

Continue reading...

Robot Turtles: A Fun Way to Target Social Communication and Coding Skills

maxresdefault

If you are looking for a fun way to target social communication skills, as well as beginning computer programming, Robot Turtles is a great new board game you can play with your students (with or without autism). Robot Turtles requires players to use simple commands to move their turtles to capture a jewel on the […]

Continue reading...