What School SLPs Want to Know

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If you want to know what the real talk is at an ASHA Schools Conference, you need to pull up a chair at the lunch tables. That’s where you’ll hear chatter about the most top-of-mind topics for the speech-language pathologists and audiologists who attend.

So it was that this roving blogger sat down to share a sandwich and some conversation with this year’s attendees. Here’s what a sampling of them report are the most burning issues that brought them to Schools 2014 in Steel City: Pittsburgh.

Brianne Young, SLP, Renfrew, Pennsylvania
I want to know how we’ll use the Common Core State Standards. We’re switching to the Common Core totally but we haven’t yet transitioned the speech-language piece of it 100 percent. We started adapting the reading and language standards last year, and nobody’s sure how this will all work. I also want to know more about incorporating Common Core with RTI.

Amy Shaver, SLP, Hamden, Connecticut
As a former stay-at-home mom just getting back into it—I just got hired fulltime by a school for next year—I want to learn more about iPad apps for speech. The technology has changed so dramatically and rapidly in eight years. It’s kind of an odd place to be because as a mom, technology can seem like a big negative. I’m always limiting my kids’ screen time. So it’s an interesting shift to think of it as an educational tool.

Sabrina Hosmer, SLP, Manchester Public Schools, Connecticut
As a bilingual evaluator, I’m here to find out how other SLPs have made systemic changes to their school districts. In our district we have problems of overidentification of speech-language disorders among bilingual children. The children are tested in English, and they’re not supposed to be, but we don’t have enough bilingual SLPs to do appropriate assessments or to serve the bilingual kids who really do have speech-language disorders.

India Parson, SLP, Prince Georges County, Maryland
What’s on my mind? The Common Core—how do we use the literacy standards with children with severe disabilities? And what’s going to happen with tying them to performance evaluations of SLPs, which they’re doing with teachers and are talking about doing with us? The other issue is the shortage of bilingual therapists. We have a big problem of overidentification of disabilities in the bilingual population. We need folks making better diagnostic decisions up front.

Christine Bainbridge, SLP, Ithaca, New York
What’s burning for me is wanting to learn more about central auditory processing disorder—what is the research evidence base on CAPD, how does it truly change children’s functioning in the classroom, and how do we intervene with it in an evidence-based way?

Audrey Webb, SLP, Charlotte, North Carolina
I’m just coming into the K-12 schools this year after working as a preschool SLP for many years, so what’s going on with the Common Core will be big. Of course, a lot of that’s up in the air now because our state legislature just repealed it, but we’ll still be using it for the time being. I’m also big on RTI. I’m a fan of it, and always interested in ways to get teachers on board with it.

Mary Pat McCarthy, SLP, Clarion, Pennsylvania
My reason for going to Schools every year is always to see what the current buzz is. It’s no one thing I want to know. It’s everything, really. I know if I go, I’ll get what I need for the coming school year. This year I’m especially interested in hearing about working with teachers on improving our work on phonology and articulation with kids. But this conference is always a great professional recharge during the summer.

 

Bridget Murray Law is managing editor of  The ASHA Leader.

SLPs in the Home: What’s Pot Got to Do with It?

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In an effort to educate therapists on the new laws and our responsibility to inform our families of issues that may arise with recreational marijuana use, Jane Woodard, the executive director of Colorado Drug Endangered Children, is traveling the state providing health care professionals the necessary information to keep ourselves and the families we serve safe. SLPs are required by law to report suspected conditions that would result in neglect/safety issues or abuse of children and adults. However, many of our families are simply not aware of the safety concerns and home based therapists are often the first resource for educating those families who choose to partake in using, growing or processing recreational marijuana.

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10 Trillion Microorganisms versus Your Toothbrush

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There are 1 trillion to 10 trillion microorganisms in your mouth. Simply brushing your teeth can get rid of that nasty bacteria film in your mouth. It can also prevent “some of that schmutz” from getting into your lungs. If you are having trace aspiration (saliva, food, and/or liquids getting into your lungs), try to make what gets into your lungs less nasty. You can prevent pneumonia.

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Kid Confidential: Parent Education and Training, Part 1

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Parent education and training is not only an important part of our job as SLPs it is an essential part of our job. Still, I’ve spoken to many SLPs over social media who still feel like they are lacking this particular skill for a number of reasons.

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Collaboration Corner: 10 Easy Tips for Parents to Support Language

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As we make our way through the lazy days of summer, schedules change, and things relax. My usual theme is collaboration; parents can be one of our biggest assets in promoting language development. Parents of young children usually want to know what they can do to support their child’s language development in the absence of a structured day. Here are 10 suggestions.

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CFY (Coming For You)!

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There is no denying the difficulty of grad school. You’re taking classes in everything, even the stuff that might not be your cup of tea. Ideally, your clinical fellowship year is in an area you particularly enjoy and the everyday implementation of book learned skills will certainly give you many ah-ha moments. What can be difficult is the frequent observation, knowing, or maybe not knowing, that someone is on the other side of that two way mirror. There is a feeling of being constantly “on.” Even paperwork remains a performance. I would drop into bed at night, completely spent.

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Favorite Resources: Fiction and Non-Fiction Texts

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School based SLPs often look to align their intervention goals with academic content standards to increase student success in the classroom. Many of these goals align with English Language Arts standards. Goals for vocabulary, comprehension, and articulation can be targeted easily using fiction and non-fiction texts. Using reading passages is a perfect way to support reading skills and curriculum. It’s also an easy way to incorporate current events or seasonal information as well. I wanted to share four different resources I used for my caseload this year.

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Three Reasons Why Kids Get Hooked on “Kids’ Meals”… and How to Change That

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As a pediatric SLP who focuses on feeding, one of the frequent comments I hear from parents is “As long we’ve got chicken nuggets, then my kid will eat.” Besides the obvious “just say no” solution, what parents truly are asking is, “How do I expand my kid’s diet to include more than what’s on a kids’ menu?” Whether we are considering our pediatric clients in feeding therapy or simply the garden-variety picky eater, that is an excellent question with not a very simple answer.

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How to Make Social Skills Stick

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  At Communication Works, a private practice in Oakland, California, we’re passionate about partnering with parents and caregivers in the treatment process. When it comes to social learning, many children struggle to carry over learned skills from the therapy setting or school to their home environment. Parents are in a perfect position to help practice […]

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In Appreciation: Jeri Logemann

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Jerilyn (Jeri) Logemann, ASHA 1994 and 2000 president and a world-renowned researcher in speech-language pathology, died at age 72 on June 19, 2014, in her home surrounded by friends.

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