Maximize Treatment Minutes by Assigning Homework

Mom and daughter doing homework

A recently published article in Frontiers of Neuroscience supports what we as clinicians know: The more time clients spend on meaningful treatment tasks, the better their outcomes.

Yet there are only so many hours in the work day, so many sessions that insurance covers and only so many minutes of treatment we can give. So how do we get around these limitations? Give your clients homework.

The article mentioned above states that patients who do exercises at home in addition to their weekly sessions improve significantly more than patients who only attend sessions. But how do we find time to create, assign and track homework in the midst of packed schedules, IEP meetings and productivity expectations?

A go-to for SLPs are worksheets and activities like those found in the Workbook of Activities for Language or Cognition and Handbook of Exercises for Language Processing series. Many SLPs also develop their own activities or assignments that they write or print for clients. These paper-based exercises are free and individualized, plus they cover any range of skills from visuospatial reasoning to word-finding.

In addition, the increasing availability of technology offers several online-based options. The app featured in the study referenced above (Constant Therapy, free for clinicians) allows SLPs to assign a variety of language or cognitive homework tasks for clients to do throughout the week on their iPads, Androids or Kindles. Plus, clinicians and patients see all of the progress tracked by the app.

There are also several other apps that help patients work on specific skills. For instance, growing numbers of interactive, pediatric-oriented games allow parents to play with their children to practice treatment skills. (I like the Bag Game from all4mychild, for example.) There are also apps aimed specifically at adults, such as those from Lingraphica, Tactus, and Virtual Speech’s new, adult-oriented series of apps (like Verbal Reasoning). There are even apps that are built into many tablets and smartphones—calendars and alarm systems—that we can use with our clients to practice executive function skills independently and functionally.

The practice of assigning homework allows the clinician to more effectively manage our time and also has a great advantage of engaging patients in their own treatment programs. Today’s technology also allows clinicians to monitor clients’ compliance while empowering them to take responsibility for their improvement.

In today’s fast-paced, schedule-packed world, we must maximize our time and that of our patients! Try out a new homework option today—then share it with a clinician friend to help them save some time, too.

 

Jordyn Sims, MS, CCC-SLP, is a speech-language pathologist working in the Boston area. She is an affiliate of ASHA Special Interest Groups 1, Language Learning and Education; 2, Neurophysiology and Neurogenic Speech and Language Disorders; and 15, Gerontology.  Sims has experience with adults and pediatrics and is a clinical consultant for Constant Therapy. jordyn.sims@gmail.com 

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