Collaboration Corner: 5 Take-Aways to Support AAC, Apps and Language

TEchnology and augmentative and alternative communication

This past month, my colleague Sean Sweeney (AKA @speechtechie) and I had the opportunity to join forces and write about AAC, apps and literacy development. Our article will be in the next issue of SIG 12: Perspectives in Augmentative and Alternative Communication.

This gave us a great opportunity to discuss how AAC users can benefit from apps to enhance treatment outcomes. Here are five highlights:

Feature matching is important: When choosing AAC or apps for learning, the tool must meet the needs of the user. For AAC, this includes the size, layout and physical accessibility of features to maximize independent use. For apps, this includes Sean’s FIVES criteria, which examines the context, appropriateness, accessibility and therapeutic considerations for learning. Just like any other tool in your kit, if it isn’t a good match then opportunities for communication or learning are potentially lost.

Make CORE align with the CORE: Using generative language formats, including core and fringe word vocabulary, benefits the student two-fold: building in opportunities for language growth throughout the day, while also meeting those pesky Common Core Standards. For example, a first grade ELA standard CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L.1.1.c, “Use singular and plural nouns with matching verbs in basic sentences.” Using core vocabulary allows the student to meet this standard through basic sentence construction activities. A first grader may enjoy learning this through the “Collins Big Cat” series, a free app that reads stories out loud and then has the option of the student recording his voice (or in this case, synthesized voice). The app also has a more interactive component, which allows the student to build scenes and narrate his own version of the story.

Apps and AAC are powerful together: Students love the interactive nature of apps. “Toca Hair Salon” is a highly interactive hair salon studio allowing students to describe how they are going to cut, color or otherwise coif the animal or person of choice. Another simple app, “Pogg,” is a cute alien that hops, sings and performs other actions, all at your student’s direction during a session. Beyond paper flashcards, the apps give students immediate reinforcement, so then work feels less like work.

Separate communication tools from other tools: If you are going to use apps and AAC at the same time, one practical solution is to use separate tools. Toggling between apps and AAC is cumbersome, and slow session momentum. In addition, having separate systems prevents the user from confusing a communication device with other technology, which is an important distinction. If your tools look the same, change the colors of the cases. If you have students that like to surf and press that home key, enable guided access so that only the AAC app is available.

Model, model, model through apps and AAC: Finally, apps provide the opportunity to model AAC live, and in unpredictable ways. You have more opportunities to explore and learn together. Don’t have curling iron as a fringe vocabulary item when using your “Toca Hair Salon” app (it’s not there, believe me)? Show your student how you can give clues to what you mean and talk it through using what is available on your AAC: “Let’s see, it’s a tool, it’s hot and it makes your hair curly…what is it?

There’s your abridged version and takeaways…log in to your SIG 12 portal for more info, and to get CEUs….ASHA renewal is right around the corner!

 

 

Reference

Sweeney, S. & Davis, K. (2014). In press. Reading, writing and AAC: Mobile technology strategies for literacy and language development. SIG 12: Perspectives in Augmentative and Alternative Communication. American Speech Language and Hearing Association.

 

 

Kerry J. Davis, EdD, CCC/SLP is a speech-language pathologist in the Boston area. She holds a special interest providing services to children and adolescents with complex communication profiles, including AAC. Davis is a volunteer SLP and consultant to Step by Step Guyana, a school for children with Autism in South America.

 

“Use Your Speech Tools!” Why Your Child Who Stutters May Not Be Using His Strategies

Stuttering Tools

When a child who stutters demonstrates the ability to change his speech during a treatment session, it seems obvious that he’d want to use the same strategies to improve speech outside the session as well.  Children, especially teenagers, rarely want to stand out in a way that stigmatizes them, provokes questions or increases the chances of teasing.   […]

Continue reading...

Tales From Apraxia Boot Camp

bootcamp

In August of this year, I was selected to be a part of The Childhood Apraxia of Speech Association of North America’s 2014 Intensive Training Institute, otherwise known as “Apraxia Boot Camp.” Twenty-four speech-language pathologists, including myself, trained with three mentors–Ruth Stoeckel, Kathy Jakielski, and Dave Hammer–at Duquesne University over four days. In its third year, […]

Continue reading...

#ASHA14 Audiologist in the House

blog

blogI have been attending the national ASHA convention since 2008 in Chicago, but this year is a special first for me–MY FIRST ASHA CONVENTION AS A CERTIFIED DOCTOR OF AUDIOLOGY!!!

Continue reading...

In Appreciation: Sylvia Onesti Richardson

Richardson Sylvia

Sylvia Onesti Richardson, president of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in 1973-74  and a passionate advocate for children with language and learning disorders, died in her home on Friday, October 24. A Tampa resident since 1980, she was 94 years old. Throughout her career, Richardson strongly advocated for children with learning disabilities and speech-language disorders: In 1949 she established at […]

Continue reading...

Cooking up the Perfect ASHA 2014

shutterstock_159814334

What’s the perfect recipe for ASHA 2014? Blend together science, learning and practice. Add a pinch of party and a heaping of gratitude. Watch it grow for generations. Like many SLP swallowologists, I’m a foodie. Expand that: I’m a bilingual (Spanish-speaking)-Canadian-American-Salsa-dancing-foodie-mama-dysphagia nut, ready for a stimulating convention getaway in Florida. Good thing ASHA has cooked-up a feast for the body and mind.

Continue reading...

Teens and Feeding Therapy:  An SLP’s Top Five Tips!

Making trying new foods fun for teens.

As a pediatric feeding therapist, it’s not unusual for me to get a call from a mother who says “My kid’s 14 years old and still eats only six foods. He’s so picky!  I thought he would grow out of it.”  True, with patience and consistent strategies, some kids do indeed grow out of the picky-eater […]

Continue reading...

Trick or Treating Voice Disorders: 3 Reasons Why It’s Not So Scary

singingcloseup

Treating clients suffering from voice disorders requires just as much creativity as treating any language or articulation disorder. It requires out-of-the-box thinking when a particular technique doesn’t work.

Continue reading...

A Misleading Account of Research on Stuttering Treatment for Young Children

stutter

A recent ASHA Leader article by Peter Reitzes on treatment for preschoolers who stutter makes claims for the efficacy of some treatments that are both misleading and not evidence based – at least as far as published research is concerned.

Continue reading...

ASHA 2014, Here I Come! It’s GO Time!

shutterstock_163286423

ASHA 2014, here I come! I’ve booked my flight. I’ve texted friends and worked out transportation. I’ve got a place to stay! I’ve joined up with some of my blogging buddies and reserved a booth for the exhibitor hall. Most importantly, I’ve started picking out a schedule for the courses I will take in November. Here are seven sessions that I’ve chosen so far.

Continue reading...